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Western Coastal Plain Major Land Resource Area

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Web services documentation

Version: 1.0

Much of the data housed in the Ecological Dynamics Interpretive Tool (EDIT) can now be accessed via web services. These services enable users to consume EDIT data directly into external applications and custom scripts written in their preferred language, among other uses.

Documentation is organized into three sections according to the file format returned by each service: JSON, tab-delimited text, and PDF. All web service requests are made using the HTTP GET method. Users can therefore call EDIT web services via URL or other standard means (e.g., AJAX). Detailed examples of using EDIT web services can be found in the tutorial sections of this page.

Developers are encouraged to specify a version when including web service calls in their application code. They are also encouraged to check for, and appropriately handle, 404 errors returned by web service requests. The current version will become deprecated following release of a new version, and all requests to deprecated versions will return a 404 error. Specify a version by adding a version query parameter to the web service call, as illustrated below. The most recent version will be used if no parameter is included.

                ?version=1.0
              

JSON

The following web services return data in JSON format. Click on a service to expand its details. All responses include cross-origin resource sharing (CORS) headers.

Class description

This service returns a JSON file of ecological class description data. Web services for individual description sections are also available. Not all sections are available for all data catalogs.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/descriptions/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
measurementSystem query optional Measurement system ("usc" or "metric"). Default is "usc".
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
generalInformation General information data (see the General Information Description web service for more details)
physiographicFeatures Physiographic features data (see the Physiographic Features Description web service for more details)
climaticFeatures Climatic features data (see the Climatic Features Description web service for more details)
waterFeatures Water features data (see the Water Features Description web service for more details)
soilFeatures Soil features data (see the Soil Features Description web service for more details)
ecologicalDynamics Ecological dynamics data (see the Ecological Dynamics Description web service for more details)
interpretations Intepretations data (see the Intepretations Description web service for more details)
supportingInformation Supporting information data (see the Supporting Information Description web service for more details)
referenceSheet Reference sheet data (see the Reference Sheet Description web service for more details)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN.json
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "generalInformation": {
        "narratives": {
            "ecoclassName": "Thermic Cherty Dolomite Upland Oak-Hickory Forest",
            "ecoclassSecondaryName": "",
            "ecoclassTertiaryName": "",
            "ecoclassConcept": "The Cherty Dolomite Upland Oak-Hickory Forest ecological site (in red) constitutes a high percentage of this MLRA.  This site is primarily forested with mixed hardwoods, currently dominated by oak and hickory.  It is characterized by rolling topography with gently sloping to very steep upland hills.  Ridges are typically wider and lower in elevation than other ridges in the MLRA.  Some of the oldest and most highly leached soils of the MLRA occur on this ecological site. ",
            "mlraNotes": "Major Land Resource Area (MLRA) 128, shown as the area shaded in gray on the accompanying figure, falls into the East and Central Farming and Forest Region.  This MLRA is in Tennessee (36 percent), Alabama (27 percent), Virginia (25 percent), and Georgia (12 percent). It makes up about 21,095 square miles (54,660 square kilometers). \r\n\r\nMost of this MLRA is in the Tennessee section of the Valley and Ridge province of the Appalachian Highlands. The thin stringers in the western part of the area are mostly in the Cumberland Plateau section of the Appalachian Plateaus province of the Appalachian Highlands.  A separate area of the MLRA in northern Alabama is in the Highland Rim section of the Interior Low Plateaus province of the Interior Plains. The western side of the area is dominantly hilly to very steep and is rougher and much steeper than the eastern side, much of which is rolling and hilly.  Elevation ranges from 660 feet (200 meters) near the southern end of the area to more than 2,400 feet (730 meters) in the part of the area in the western tip of Virginia. Some isolated linear mountain ridges rise to nearly 4,920 feet (1,500 meters) above sea level. \r\n\r\nThe MLRA is highly diversified. It has many parallel ridges, narrow intervening valleys, and large areas of low, irregular hills. The bedrock in this area consists of alternating beds of limestone, dolomite, shale, and sandstone of early Paleozoic age. Ridgetops are capped with more resistant carbonate and sandstone layers, and valleys have been eroded into the less resistant shale beds. These folded and faulted layers are at the southernmost extent of the Appalachian Mountains. The narrow river valleys are filled with unconsolidated deposits of clay, silt, sand, and gravel.",
            "lruNotes": "",
            "classification": "This site falls into the \"Southern Limestone/Dolomite Valleys and Low Rolling Hills\" ecoregional classification developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (Authors: Glenn Griffith, James Omernik, Sandra Azevedo).  \r\n\r\nThe USGS-based Southeast GAP Analysis Project classifies this area under two major forest types: South-Central Interior Mesophytic Forest (CES202.887) and Southern Ridge and Valley/Cumberland Dry Calcareous Forest (CES202.457).  "
        },
        "images": [],
        "correlatedStates": [
            "AL",
            "GA",
            "TN"
        ],
        "associatedSites": [],
        "similarSites": [],
        "dominantSpecies": {
            "dominantTree1": "Quercus alba",
            "dominantShrub1": "Cercis canadensis",
            "dominantHerb1": "Vitis rotundifolia",
            "dominantTree2": "Carya glabra",
            "dominantShrub2": "Oxydendrum arboreum",
            "dominantHerb2": "Polystichum acrostichoides"
        }
    },
    "physiographicFeatures": {
        "narratives": {
            "physiographicFeatures": "This ecological site occurs on summits, shoulders, and backslopes on dissected uplands weathered from cherty dolomitic limestone.  Slopes are 2 to 60 percent.  Elevation ranges from 500 to 2,130 feet.  The topography ranges from ridges to rolling hills.\r\n\r\nThis site can generate runoff to adjacent, downslope ecological sites.  This site does not flood.  \r\n"
        },
        "images": [
            {
                "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/es/13781.jpg",
                "orientation": "landscape",
                "caption": "Example Block Diagram for Cherty Dolomite Upland"
            }
        ],
        "landforms": [
            {
                "landscape": "",
                "landform": "Ridge",
                "microfeature": "",
                "landscapeDesc": "",
                "landformDesc": "A long, narrow elevation of the land surface, usually sharp crested with steep sides and forming an extended upland between valleys.  The term is used in areas of both hill and mountain relief.  HP",
                "microfeatureDesc": "",
                "modifiers": ""
            },
            {
                "landscape": "",
                "landform": "Hill",
                "microfeature": "",
                "landscapeDesc": "",
                "landformDesc": "A generic term for an elevated area of the land surface, rising at least 30 m (100 ft.) to as much as 300 meters (approx. 1000 ft.) above surrounding lowlands, usually with a nominal summit area relative to bounding slopes, a well-defined, rounded outline and slopes that generally exceed 15 percent.  A hill can occur as a single, isolated mass or in a group.  A hill can be further specified based on the magnitude of local relief: low hill (30 - 90 m) or high hill (90 - 300 m).  Informal distinctions between a hill and a mountain are often arbitrary and dependent on local convention. Compare - hillock, plateau, mountain, foothills, hills.  SW &  HP",
                "microfeatureDesc": "",
                "modifiers": ""
            }
        ],
        "aspect": [
            "SE",
            "SW",
            "NW"
        ],
        "nominalProperties": [],
        "ordinalProperties": [
            {
                "property": "Flooding frequency",
                "representativeLow": "None",
                "representativeHigh": "None",
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": "",
                "representativeLowDesc": "No reasonable possibility of flooding; near 0 percent chance of flooding in any year or less than 1 time in 500 years.",
                "representativeHighDesc": "No reasonable possibility of flooding; near 0 percent chance of flooding in any year or less than 1 time in 500 years.",
                "rangeLowDesc": "",
                "rangeHighDesc": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Ponding frequency",
                "representativeLow": "None",
                "representativeHigh": "None",
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": "",
                "representativeLowDesc": "No reasonable possibility of ponding, near 0 percent chance on ponding in any year.",
                "representativeHighDesc": "No reasonable possibility of ponding, near 0 percent chance on ponding in any year.",
                "rangeLowDesc": "",
                "rangeHighDesc": ""
            }
        ],
        "intervalProperties": [
            {
                "property": "Elevation",
                "unit": "ft",
                "representativeLow": 500,
                "representativeHigh": 2130,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Slope",
                "unit": "%",
                "representativeLow": 2,
                "representativeHigh": 60,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Water table depth",
                "unit": "in",
                "representativeLow": 60,
                "representativeHigh": 60,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            }
        ],
        "propertyRVCount": 5,
        "propertyRangeCount": 0
    },
    "climaticFeatures": {
        "narratives": {
            "climaticFeatures": "This area falls under the humid, mesothermal climate classification (Thornwaite, 1948).  Precipitation is fairly evenly distributed throughout the year, with little or no water deficiency during any season.  The average annual precipitation in most of this area is 45 to 55 inches.  It increases to the south.  Maximum precipitation occurs in midwinter and midsummer, and the minimum occurs in autumn.  Most rainfall occurs as high-intensity, convective thunderstorms.  Snowfall may occur in winter.  Average annual temperatures range from 46 to 70 degrees F, increasing to the south.  The freeze-free period averages 205 days and is longest in the southern part of the area and shortest at higher elevations to the north.  The growing season corresponds to climate.  Local climate can be variable and microclimates factor into the distribution of plants.  In general, topographic features such as slope aspect, landform, steepness, and position of the ridges and valleys are important site variables in the distribution of vegetation across the landscape (Martin, 1989).",
            "climateSources": ""
        },
        "map": {
            "representativeLow": "",
            "representativeHigh": "",
            "rangeLow": "",
            "rangeHigh": "",
            "average": 53
        },
        "frostFreeDays": {
            "representativeLow": "",
            "representativeHigh": "",
            "rangeLow": "",
            "rangeHigh": "",
            "average": 172
        },
        "freezeFreeDays": {
            "representativeLow": "",
            "representativeHigh": "",
            "rangeLow": "",
            "rangeHigh": "",
            "average": 195
        },
        "normalsRVCount": 0,
        "normalsRangeCount": 0,
        "monthlyPrec": {
            "representativeLow": {
                "1": 3.7,
                "2": 3.1,
                "3": 4,
                "4": 2.9,
                "5": 3.4,
                "6": 2.8,
                "7": 3,
                "8": 2.4,
                "9": 2.4,
                "10": 1.8,
                "11": 3.3,
                "12": 3.2
            },
            "representativeHigh": {
                "1": 6,
                "2": 5.3,
                "3": 6.8,
                "4": 5,
                "5": 5.5,
                "6": 5.1,
                "7": 5.1,
                "8": 4.1,
                "9": 4.8,
                "10": 3.8,
                "11": 5.2,
                "12": 5.7
            },
            "rangeLow": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "rangeHigh": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "average": {
                "1": 0,
                "2": 0,
                "3": 0,
                "4": 0,
                "5": 0,
                "6": 0,
                "7": 0,
                "8": 0,
                "9": 0,
                "10": 0,
                "11": 0,
                "12": 0
            }
        },
        "monthlyTmin": {
            "representativeLow": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "representativeHigh": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "rangeLow": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "rangeHigh": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "average": {
                "1": 27,
                "2": 30,
                "3": 36,
                "4": 44,
                "5": 54,
                "6": 63,
                "7": 67,
                "8": 65,
                "9": 58,
                "10": 46,
                "11": 37,
                "12": 29
            }
        },
        "monthlyTmax": {
            "representativeLow": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "representativeHigh": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "rangeLow": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "rangeHigh": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "average": {
                "1": 48,
                "2": 53,
                "3": 62,
                "4": 71,
                "5": 78,
                "6": 85,
                "7": 88,
                "8": 88,
                "9": 82,
                "10": 72,
                "11": 61,
                "12": 50
            }
        },
        "climatePattern": [
            {
                "year": 1981,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1982,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1983,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1984,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1985,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1986,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1987,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1988,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1989,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1991,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1992,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1993,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1994,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1995,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1996,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1997,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1998,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1999,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2000,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2001,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2002,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2003,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2004,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2005,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2006,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2007,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2008,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2009,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2010,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            }
        ],
        "stations": [],
        "precipitationUnit": "in",
        "temperatureUnit": "°F"
    },
    "waterFeatures": {
        "narratives": {
            "waterFeatures": "This site is not influenced by water from a wetland or stream.  ",
            "wetlandDescription": ""
        },
        "images": []
    },
    "soilFeatures": {
        "narratives": {
            "soilFeatures": "This ecological site is represented by soils in the Ultisols soil order. Major soil series for this ecological site are Pailo, Bodine, Fullerton, and Minvale. Map units having these soils as both major and minor components, either in consociations or complexes, make up the majority of the ecological site.  These soils have a thermic temperature regime and an udic moisture regime.  They are extremely deep, well drained, highly weathered, and acidic.  Soils associated with this ecological site formed in colluvium or soil creep, over the underlying residuum from cherty dolomitic limestone and from residuum from cherty dolomitic limestone.  \r\n\r\nIn general, Ultisols are formed from parent materials that contain small amounts of basic cations.  The Ultisols in this ecological site description are derived from cherty dolomitic limestone.  In weathering, the dolomite produces silica. The silica accumulates in the soil as chert.  Chert produced during weathering is generally porous and cavernous, but in some areas, it is massive. Water availability generally goes down as the percentage of chert goes up (Martin 1989).  This can affect the local distribution of plant species within this site.  Being silica based, the reaction of soils weathered from cherty dolomitic limestone range from strongly acid to extremely strongly acid in the particle size control section. Soils weathering from the cherty dolomitic limestone have mineralogy from siliceous to kaolinitic.  The particle size family for these soils includes fine-loamy, loamy-skeletal, and fine. Drainage classes for the selected soil series are well drained and somewhat excessively drained.   \r\n\r\nThe parent materials and landforms in this physiographic province are geologically old.  These soils have become highly weathered and leached over time due to the age of parent materials, thermic temperature regime and udic moisture regime, leaving soils with a naturally low nutrient content, low base status, and high subsoil acidity. These become limitations from an agricultural and timber standpoint but can be easily overcome by adequate application of lime, fertilizer, and use of best management practices (Buol et al., 1997)."
        },
        "images": [
            {
                "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/es/14968.jpg",
                "orientation": "portrait",
                "caption": "Fullerton series soil profile"
            }
        ],
        "texture": [
            {
                "texture": "Silt loam",
                "modifier1": "Gravelly",
                "modifier2": "",
                "modifier3": "",
                "termInLieu": ""
            },
            {
                "texture": "Loam",
                "modifier1": "Very gravelly",
                "modifier2": "",
                "modifier3": "",
                "termInLieu": ""
            },
            {
                "texture": "Silty clay loam",
                "modifier1": "Extremely gravelly",
                "modifier2": "",
                "modifier3": "",
                "termInLieu": ""
            }
        ],
        "parentMaterial": [
            {
                "kind": "Residuum",
                "origin": "Chert",
                "kindDesc": "Unconsolidated, weathered, or partly weathered mineral material that accumulates by disintegration of bedrock in place.",
                "originDesc": "A hard, extremely dense or compact, dull to semivitreous, cryptocrystalline sedimentary rock, consisting dominantly of interlocking crystals of quartz less than about 30 mm in diameter; it may contain amorphous silica (opal). It sometimes contains impurities such as calcite, iron oxide, or the remains of silicious and other organisims. It has a tough, splintery to conchoidal fracture and may be white or variously colored gray, green, blue, pink, red, yellow, brown, and black. Chet occurs principally as nodular or concretionary segregations in limestones and dolomites."
            },
            {
                "kind": "Colluvium",
                "origin": "Dolomite",
                "kindDesc": "Unconsolidated, unsorted earth material being transported or deposited on side slopes and/or at the base of slopes by mass movement (e.g. direct gravitational action) and by local, unconcentrated runoff.",
                "originDesc": "A carbonate sedimentary rock consisting chiefly (more than 50 percent by weight or by areal percentages under the microscope) of the mineral dolomite."
            },
            {
                "kind": "Creep deposits",
                "origin": "Cherty limestone",
                "kindDesc": "Sediment resulting from slow mass movement of earth material down slopes, caused by gravity but facilitated by saturation with water and alternate freezing and thawing.",
                "originDesc": " "
            }
        ],
        "nominalProperties": [
            {
                "property": "Family particle size",
                "value": "clayey",
                "description": "Reference: Keys to Soil Taxonomy Twelfth Edition, Soil Survey Staff, USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service"
            }
        ],
        "ordinalProperties": [
            {
                "property": "Drainage class",
                "representativeLow": "Well drained",
                "representativeHigh": "Somewhat excessively drained",
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": "",
                "representativeLowDesc": " ",
                "representativeHighDesc": " ",
                "rangeLowDesc": "",
                "rangeHighDesc": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Permeability class",
                "representativeLow": "Moderate",
                "representativeHigh": "Rapid",
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": "",
                "representativeLowDesc": "",
                "representativeHighDesc": "",
                "rangeLowDesc": "",
                "rangeHighDesc": ""
            }
        ],
        "intervalProperties": [
            {
                "property": "Soil depth",
                "unit": "in",
                "representativeLow": 60,
                "representativeHigh": 203,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Surface fragment cover <=3\"",
                "unit": "%",
                "representativeLow": 6,
                "representativeHigh": 40,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Surface fragment cover >3\"",
                "unit": "%",
                "representativeLow": 0,
                "representativeHigh": 18,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            }
        ],
        "profileProperties": [
            {
                "property": "Available water capacity",
                "unit": "in",
                "topDepth": 0,
                "bottomDepth": 40,
                "representativeLow": 1,
                "representativeHigh": 8.1,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Soil reaction (1:1 water)",
                "unit": "",
                "topDepth": 0,
                "bottomDepth": 40,
                "representativeLow": 4,
                "representativeHigh": 6,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Subsurface fragment volume <=3\"",
                "unit": "%",
                "topDepth": "",
                "bottomDepth": "",
                "representativeLow": 13,
                "representativeHigh": 58,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Subsurface fragment volume >3\"",
                "unit": "%",
                "topDepth": "",
                "bottomDepth": "",
                "representativeLow": 0,
                "representativeHigh": 23,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            }
        ],
        "propertyRVCount": 9,
        "propertyRangeCount": 0
    },
    "ecologicalDynamics": {
        "narratives": {
            "ecologicalDynamics": "The information contained in the state and transition model (STM) and the ecological site description was developed using archeological and historical data, professional experience, and scientific studies.  The information presented is representative of a very complex set of plant communities.  Not all scenarios or plants are included.  Key indicator plants, animals, and ecological processes are described to inform land management decisions.  \r\n\r\nThe historic reference plant community phase of the Cherty Dolomite Upland is perceived to be a mixed hardwood forest, dominated by oaks and hickories now.  Prior to the decimation of the American chestnut (Castanea dentata) by the chestnut blight, that species would have been important.  White oak (Quercus alba), pignut hickory (Carya glabra), northern red oak (Quercus rubra) and tuliptree (Liriodendron tulipifera) most commonly occur in the canopy of forest stands although a multitude of other hardwood and some pine tree species can occur to varying degrees across the landscape.  For example, chestnut oak (Quercus prinus) commonly assumes dominance on drier ridgetop positions (Condley 1984).  Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) can be important toward the southern extent of the MLRA.    \r\n\r\nThe forests of today are likely the result of a series of complex disturbances including the loss of American chestnut in the 1930s (Thor and Summers 1971) (Nelson 1955), broad-scale and intense land-use change, fire and fire suppression, highly dynamic wildlife populations and a substantial climatic shift toward increased moisture availability (McEwan et al. 2011).  They are forests in transition as the often dense mid-story of sugar maple (Acer saccharum), red maple (Acer rubrum) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia) indicates (McEwan et al. 2011).  These mesophytic species are capable of achieving dominance and that species composition shift has become a concern, especially in relation to forestry and wildlife impacts.  Other mid-story trees include flowering dogwood (Cornus florida), pawpaw (Asimina triloba), sourwood (Oxydendrum arboreum ), and eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis).  \r\n\r\nThe forest understory includes native vines, ferns, and herbs including Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia), eastern poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia), greenbriar (Smilax spp.), littlebrownjug (Hexastylis arifolia), mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum), feathery false lily of the valley (Maianthemum racemosum), yellow wakerobin (Trillium luteum), and Christmas fern (Polystichum acrostichoides).  Tree regeneration also represents a percentage of the understory, with the maples and American beech occurring most commonly (Hart et al. 2008).  \r\n\r\nMost species associated with this site are generalists and demonstrate wide ecological amplitude to tolerate a variety of environmental conditions but a few are more limited.  In general, soil moisture is the single most important factor for plant growth and plant species occur along a moisture gradient determined by topographic factors such as aspect, slope shape, slope inclination, and slope position (Martin 1971).  Typically, chestnut oak forest communities dominate ridgetops; white oak – black oak (Quercus velutina) communities are found on drier, exposed slopes.  Tuliptree prefers small depressions and receiving positions; shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata) and Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) occur sporadically, typically on more exposed positions.  Northern red oak seems to prefer midslope positions.  Scarlet oak (Quercus coccinea) is found often on warmer, drier positions.  Understory diversity tends to increase on north-facing slopes (contingent on past land use) and on lower slope positions and decrease on ridges and exposed south-facing slopes.  \r\n\r\nSouth of this site, equivalent soils produce oak-pine dominated forests indicating that latitude does affect species distribution (Martin 1989) and production (Condley 1984) within the major land resource area.  \r\n\r\nThere is strong evidence to suggest that humankind has occupied the ridge and valley and interacted with the land for the past 10,000 years or more (Chapman, 1982).  Native American population demographics changed over time, as did the type and intensity of their land use practices.  It is likely that land clearance and cultivation over the last several thousand years increased the amount of forest edge considerably (Chapman, 1982).  The exact mechanisms of this change prior to European settlement are unclear, but there is little doubt that American Indians were cultivating crops, cutting trees to use for fuel wood and building materials, planting orchards for fruit and nut production, and using prescribed fire to clear land for settlement and open the forest for hunting.  The effects of their management practices were probably highly variable across the landscape and intermediate in scale.  The best available studies suggest that due to the land use practices of Native Americans in this general region, oaks and chestnuts became dominant on upper slopes, fire-adapted pines established on ridges, and disturbance-adapted hardwoods colonized old fields (Delcourt, 1998).     \r\n\r\nAfter European settlement and expansion in the early 1800’s, land use changed drastically both in terms of type and intensity.  The early pioneers used the forests for food for themselves and their livestock in addition to cutting wood for fuel, shelter, etc.  A common practice was to use forested ridges for pasture.  They also cleared forests for habitation, pastures, and fields.  As industrialization occurred and people moved into more urban areas, many of the pastures and fields were abandoned and reverted to forest.  These forests are now largely occupied by low-quality, mixed hardwood-pine and small-sawtimber size hardwood stands (Smith, 1995).  \r\n\r\nIn addition to forest clearing for small settlement farms, the forests of this area were extensively logged in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, before the advent of modern forestry and soil conservation practices.  During this time, boomtowns sprang up around lumber mills and railroads were built to accommodate the trade.  Termed “the Big Cut” by local foresters, this period in history resulted in probably the most significant forest disturbance to date.  Almost all forests in this region were impacted to some degree and stands which exhibit old-growth characteristics are extremely rare today.\r\n\r\nDestructive fires often followed poor logging practices, killing young stands, damaging older tree trunks and causing heavy losses in soil fertility.  However, while fire prevention and suppression programs in the 1930’s decreased the loss of forest resources to wildfire, it also impacted forest dynamics significantly (Smith, 1995).  The role of fire in the greater Southern Appalachian Hardwood region as a whole (which encompasses this ecological site) is not well understood and research into the complex relationship between fire and oak forests is emerging (Arthur et al. 2012).\r\n\r\nAnother important disturbance in the eastern forest was the loss of the American chestnut to the exotic chestnut blight fungus in the early 1900’s.  It had moved through Tennessee, killing most chestnut trees by 1930 (Hart, 2008).  It is widely accepted that chestnut was replaced by oak and hickory species, especially in upland areas; although, other species including red maple would also have benefited (Keever, 1953; Stephenson et al., 1991).  \r\n\r\nMost oak species would likely also have responded favorably to the heavy disturbances caused by logging and fire in the early years of settlement.  The combined result is the heavily oak-hickory dominated forests common on upland sites today.   \r\n\r\nPresent-day disturbances include poor logging practices such as high-grading or diameter-limit cutting, which selects higher-quality trees for extraction and leaves defective or unhealthy trees.  This results in forest stands that are degraded in terms of genetics, species composition, forest health, and timber quality.  Most stands in this ecological site have been high-graded multiple times.  \r\n\r\nInvasive exotic pest plant species are negatively impacting the overall health of forested stands.  Plant species of concern in forests include tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima), Asian bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus), autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellate var, parviflora), bicolor lespedeza (Lespedeza bicolor), the exotic privets (Ligustrum spp.), princess tree (Paulownia tomentosa), kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata), multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora), and the exotic honeysuckles (Lonicera spp.).  Forests are particularly susceptible to exotic plant invasion after a disturbance, which further complicates management decisions.  In general, in the South, invasive exotic plants should be considered in nearly every management scenario. \r\n\r\nThe Tennessee Division of Forestry lists four major areas of concern for forest pests:  gypsy moth, southern pine beetle, oak decline, and dogwood anthracnose.  All of these could be significant threats to the health of forests associated with this ecological site.  The recently detected thousand cankers disease and emerald ash borer pose new threats to black walnut (Juglans nigra) and ash species (Fraxinus spp.), respectively.\r\n\r\nA state and transition model for the Thermic Cherty Dolomite Upland ecological site follows this narrative.  Thorough descriptions of each state, transition, plant community, and pathway follow the model.  Experts base this model on available experimental research, field observations, professional consensus, and interpretations.  It is likely to change as knowledge increases.  \r\n\r\nPlant communities will differ across the major land resource area because of the naturally occurring variability in weather, soils, and aspect.  The Reference Plant Community is not necessarily the management goal.  The biological processes on this site are complex.  Therefore, representative values are presented in a land management context.  The species lists are representative and are not botanical descriptions of all species occurring, or potentially occurring, on this site.  They are not intended to cover every situation or the full range of conditions, species, and responses for the site.  \r\n\r\nThe following diagram suggests pathways that the vegetation on these sites will most likely take, given the above general descriptions of climate, soils, and disturbance histories. Specific areas with unique soils and disturbance histories may have alternative pathways not shown on this diagram. This information is intended to show what might happen given average site conditions and a history of repeated disturbances as described above. Local professional guidance should always be sought before pursuing a treatment scenario."
        },
        "images": [
            {
                "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/es/14926.jpg",
                "orientation": "landscape",
                "caption": "Thermic Cherty Dolomite Upland"
            },
            {
                "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/es/14970.jpg",
                "orientation": "landscape",
                "caption": "Thermic Cherty Dolomite Upland STM Legend"
            }
        ]
    },
    "interpretations": {
        "narratives": {
            "animalCommunity": "The oak-hickory forests that represent the reference state provide important mast production for a variety of wildlife species. Acorns in particular are an extremely important food source for birds and mammals during the dormant season (McShea et al., 2006). Ninety-six species of birds and mammals are known to consume acorns, especially in fall and winter (Martin, 1961). Acorns produced from white oak tree species (white oak, chestnut oak, etc.) are typically more palatable than acorns from the red oak group, although red oak acorns are still an important food source, particularly in the winter season when acorns from white oak species have already been consumed.  Examples of animals that consume acorns within this ecological site include insects such as the acorn weevil, birds (e.g. wild turkeys, northern bobwhite quail, woodpeckers, blue jays, crows), small mammals (e.g., chipmunks, fox squirrels, flying squirrels, rabbits, mice, voles, raccoons and opossums), and large mammals (e.g., white-tailed deer, red and gray foxes, black bear), (Dickson, 2004).  Prior to its extinction, the passenger pigeon would have been an important consumer and distributor of acorns as well (Frelich and Reich, 2002).  \r\n \r\nOak is considered a foundation species for wildlife in the eastern forest (McShea et al., 2006).  However, oak species have considerable variability in acorn production (crop size from year to year), which can substantially affect the availability of mast for wildlife.  Providing variety in hard and soft mast producing species can help to ensure that food is available from season to season and from year to year.  Hickory nuts can also be important mast for wildlife.  In fact, hickory makes up 10 to 20 percent of squirrel diets in similar systems (Apsley and Gehrt, 2006).  \r\n \r\nFrom a habitat perspective, oak-hickory forests are extremely important.  For example, numerous birds depend on different stages of these forest systems to survive. The Appalachian region, the location of this ecological site, is the center of the summer breeding range of neotropical migratory birds. Neotropical migrants include forest-interior, forest-edge, and early-successional species and comprise 65 to 85 percent of breeding birds (Smith, 1995).  The Indiana bat is the primary threatened and endangered bat species.  Shaggy bark (e.g., shagbark hickory) and scaly bark (white oak) species provide excellent roosting sites for this species.  The Northern long eared bat is not listed yet, but is expected to be and would also use associated trees as roosting sites.\r\n \r\nYoung (1 to 10 year post-disturbance) upland oak forests function as high-quality food patches for myriad wildlife species. Fruit producing early successional plants such as pokeweed and blackberry, young shrubs, and tree sprouts play an important role in the diets of several bird species, arthropods, and small mammals that serve as prey for numerous snake, bird, and mammal predators (Greenberg, et al. 2011).  Mature stands serve as habitat for wild turkey in fall and winter where they utilize acorns as an important part of their diet.  Additionally, most forest-dwelling amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals required at least a sawtimber stage of maturity in similar forest systems in New England (Healy, 2002).  \r\n \r\nSnags, cavity trees, and downed logs provide habitat for a wide variety of wildlife species; as such, they are important components of oak-hickory forests on this ecological site. Snags are standing dead or dying trees, and downed logs are simply logs that are on or near the forest floor. Cavity trees are live trees with holes big enough to shelter animals. This includes trees with cavities in the limbs, which can actually be more important to some wildlife species than larger hollow trees. Snags are created by lightning, storm breakage, fire, disease, insects, drought, flooding, cultural practices, among other factors that contribute to tree mortality.\r\n \r\n \r\nWildlife species are affected by ecological dynamics in upland oak forests to varying degrees. Management must consider all factors that could impact wildlife populations and be site-based in application. A balance of successional stages in sustainable proportions across the landscape (multiple forest age classes) with consideration for snags and cavity trees will sustain high quality food patches and habitat for wildlife overall.",
            "hydrologicalFunctions": "Soils in forests have well developed structure, which is maintained by many factors of the forest environment.  The surface of the soil is protected from raindrop impact by the forest canopy and the surface organic layers (Carmean, 1957), infiltration is generally good and runoff is low.  \r\n\r\nLong-term research on mixed hardwood forests in this region indicates that there is little long-term effect of clearcutting and other logging practices on hydrologic and water quality sustainability, especially at smaller scales (Swank et al., 2001). Harvesting increases annual water yield typically only during the first 4 to 5 years after cutting.  However, harvesting practices vary and have an impact on the severity of impact to hydrologic function.  For example, clear-cut size, logging techniques, and the density and condition of logging roads can all create more surface soil disturbance which results in more runoff.  Following best management practices (BMPs) is a good way to avoid the negative impacts of logging to soil and water resources both in the short and long term.  \r\n\r\nUnlike the short-term effect of most forestry practices, conversion of forest land to pasture or lawn (urban use) can result in higher bulk densities and lower infiltration rates and water holding capacities in soils, which can be attributed to higher compaction associated with land management practices (Price et al., 2010).  This leads to increased runoff and can negatively influence water quality.  Good pasture management can reduce negative effects to some extent and should always be employed to protect soil and water quality wherever possible.  ",
            "recreationalUses": "Most of the Thermic Cherty Dolomite Uplands is under private ownership so public recreation opportunities are limited.  However, some of the western part of the Conasauga Ranger District (Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest) falls within this ecological site.  The opportunities there include bicycling, camping and cabins, hiking, horse riding, nature viewing, off-highway vehicle riding, picnicking, and scenic driving.  \r\n\r\nSimilar opportunities can be found on smaller parcels of land owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority.  Several of their Small Wild Areas (SWAs) on this ecological site have hiking trails and scenic overlooks. The University of Tennessee Forest Resources AgResearch and Education Center almost entirely falls within this ecological site.  There are numerous hiking trails, an Arboretum and outdoor classroom and educational nature trails available to the public, among other opportunities. ",
            "woodProducts": "This ecological site is dominated by forests in varying stages of succession.  Most forestland is held by small, private landowners.  Only a small extent of this ecological site occurs on public land.  Important wood products include hardwood sawlogs (red oak, white oak, ash, tuliptree, walnut, cherry, sugar maple, and hickory), crosstie logs, hickory handle logs, white oak stave logs, hardwood pulpwood, softwood logs and veneer logs (Tennessee Forest Products Bulletin, 2013).  ",
            "otherProducts": "",
            "otherInformation": ""
        },
        "siteProductivity": [
            {
                "symbol": "QUAL",
                "commonName": "white oak",
                "scientificName": "Quercus alba",
                "indexMin": 65,
                "indexMax": 75,
                "cmaiMin": 0,
                "cmaiMax": 0,
                "cmaiAge": "",
                "siteCurve": 810,
                "basis": "",
                "citation": ""
            },
            {
                "symbol": "LITU",
                "commonName": "tuliptree",
                "scientificName": "Liriodendron tulipifera",
                "indexMin": 70,
                "indexMax": 85,
                "cmaiMin": 0,
                "cmaiMax": 0,
                "cmaiAge": "",
                "siteCurve": 355,
                "basis": "",
                "citation": ""
            }
        ],
        "otherProductivity": []
    },
    "supportingInformation": {
        "narratives": {
            "dataReferences": "30 tier 1-2 plots; 1 pasture plot (NRI); 7 tier 3 reference plots; 10 site index plots.  ",
            "otherReferences": "Alexander, Heather D. and M.A. Arthur. 2010. Implications of a predicted shift from upland oaks to red maple on forest hydrology and nutrient availability. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 40: 716-726.\r\n\r\nApsley, David and S. Gehert.  2006.  Enhancing food (mast) production for woodland wildlife in Ohio.  Extension Fact Sheet F-60-06, Ohio State University Extension, School of Natural Resources, Columbus, OH.\r\n\r\nArthur, Mary A., H.D. Alexander, D.C. Dey, C.J. Schweitzer, and D.L. Loftis.  2012.  Refining the oak-fire hypothesis for management of oak-dominated forests of the eastern United States. Journal of Forestry 110: 257-266.\r\n\r\nBraun, E. Lucy.  1947.  Development of the Deciduous Forests of Eastern North America. Ecological Monographs 17(2):  211 - 219.\r\n\r\nBrose, Patrick H., D.C. Dey, R.J. Phillips, and T.A. Waldrop.  2013.  A meta-analysis of the fire-oak hypothesis:  Does prescribed burning promote oak reproduction in eastern North America?  Forest Science 59(3):  322 – 334. \r\n\r\nBuol, Stan W., F.D. Hole, R.J. McCracken, R.J. Southard.  1997.  Soil Genesis and Classification (4th ed.). Ames, Iowa: Iowa State University Press. Pp. 353 - 359. \r\n\r\nCarmean, Willard H.  1957.  The structure of forest soils.  The Ohio Journal of Science 57(3):  165-168.\r\n\r\nCase, Earl C.  1925.  The valley of east Tennessee: The adjustment of industry to natural environment.  Bulletin 36.  Division of Geology, Nashville, Tennessee.\r\n\r\nChapman, Jefferson, P.A. Delcourt, P.A. Cridlebaugh, A.B. Shea, and H.R. Delcourt.  1982.   Man-land interaction: 10,000 years of American Indian impact on native ecosystems in the lower little Tennessee River valley, eastern Tennessee.  Southeastern Archaeology 1:  115–121.\r\n\r\nClark, Stacy L. and C.J. Schweitzer.  2013.  Red maple (Acer rubrum) response to prescribed burning on the William B. Bankhead National Forest, Alabama.  In: Guldin, James M., ed. 2013. Proceedings of the 15th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-175. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 271-276. \r\n\r\nCondley, Brandon C. 1984.  The ridge top chestnut oak forest community of the Ridge and Valley Physiographic Province and adjacent areas. M.S. Thesis.  The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.\r\n\r\nDale, Virginia H., L.K. Mann, R.J. Olson, D.W. Johnson, and K.C. Dearstone.  1990.  The long-term influence of past land use on the Walker Branch forest.  Landscape Ecology 4(4):  211-224.\r\n\r\nDelcourt, Paul. A. and H.R. Delcourt.  1998.  The influence of prehistoric human-set fires on oak-chestnut forests in the southern Appalachians. Castanea 63:  337–345.\r\n\r\nDeSelm, Hal. R. 1984.  Potential national natural landmarks of the Appalachian ranges natural region: Ecological report. University of Tennessee, Knoxville.\r\n\r\nDickson, James G. Wildlife and upland oak forests.  In: Spetich, Martin A., ed. 2004.  Upland oak ecology symposium:  history, current conditions, and sustainability.  Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-73. Asheville, NC:  U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 311 p.\r\n\r\nEvans, Richard M. 1992.  Soil and water conservation plan for:  The University of Tennessee Forestry Experiment Station.  \r\n\r\nGreen, Jonathan D., W.W. Witt, and J.R. Martin.  2006.  Weed management in grass pastures, hayfields, and other farmstead sites.  University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service publication AGR-172. \r\n\r\nGreenberg, Catherine H., R.W. Perry, C.A. Harper, D.J. Levey, J.M. McCord.  2011.  The role of recently disturbed upland hardwood forest as high quality food patches. In: Sustaining Young Forest Communities: Ecology and management of early successional habitats in the Central Hardwood Region, USA. Managing Forest Ecosystems.  pp. 121–141.\r\n\r\nHart, Justin L., S.L. van de Gevel, and H.D. Grissino-Mayer. 2008.  Forest dynamics in a natural area of the southern Ridge and Valley, Tennessee. Natural Areas Journal 28:  275–289.\r\n\r\nHart, Justin L. and J.A. Kupfer.  2011.  Sapling richness and composition in canopy gaps of a southern Appalachian mixed Quercus forest.  Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society 138(2):  207-219.\r\n\r\nHart, Justin L., S.L. Clark, S.J. Torreano, and M.L. Buchanan.  2012.  Composition, structure, and dendroecology of an old-growth Quercus forest on the tablelands of the Cumberland Plateau, USA.  Forest Ecology and Management 266:  11-24.  \r\n\r\nHart, Justin L., M.L. Buchanan, S.L. Clark., and S.J. Torreano.  2012.  Canopy accession strategies and climate-growth relationships in Acer rubrum.  Forest Ecology and Management 282:  124-132. \r\n\r\nJohnson, E.A.  1952.  Effect of farm woodland grazing on watershed values in the southern Appalachian Mountains.  Journal of Forestry 50(2):  109 – 113. \r\n\r\nKeever, C. 1953. Present composition of some stands of the former oak-chestnut forest in the southern Blue Ridge Mountains. Ecology. 34: 44-54.\r\n\r\nLoftis, David L. 2004.  Upland oak regeneration and management.  In:  Proceedings of the Upland oak ecology symposium.  USDA Forest Service, Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-73, Southern Research Station, Asheville, NC. pp 163 - 167.\r\n\r\nLorimer, Craig G.  2001.  Historical and ecological roles of disturbance in Eastern North American forests: 9,000 years of change. Wildlife Society Bulletin 29:  425–439.\r\n\r\nMartin, Alexander C., H.C. Zim, and A.L. Nelson.  1961.  American wildlife and plants:  A guide to wildlife food habits.  Dover, New York, New York, USA.\r\n\r\nMartin, William H.  1971.  Forest communities of the dissected uplands in the Great Valley of east Tennessee and their relationship to soil and topographic properties.  PhD Dissertation.  The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.\r\n\r\nMartin, William H.  1989.  Forest patterns in the Great Valley of Tennessee.  Journal of the Tennessee Academy of Science 64(3):  137 – 143.\r\n\r\nMcEwan, Ryan W., J.M. Dyer, and N. Pederson.  2011.  Multiple interacting ecosystem drivers:  Toward an encompassing hypothesis of oak forest dynamics across eastern North America.  Ecography 34:  244-256. \r\n\r\nMcGrath, J.C., and W. K. Clatterbuck.  2013. Assessing anthropogenic and natural disturbances: Vegetational response to similarly aged clearcut and tornado disturbances in an East Tennessee oak-hickory forest.  In:  Proceedings of 15th Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference, Hot Springs, AR, November 18-20, 2009. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-175. Asheville, NC: USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 81-90.\r\n\r\nMcShea, William J., W.M. Healy, P. Devers, T. Fearer, F.H. Koch, D. Stauffer, and J. Waldon.  2007.  Forestry matters:  Decline of oaks will impact wildlife in hardwood forests.  Journal of Wildlife Management 71(5):  1717-1728.\r\n\r\nNelson, Thomas C.  1955.  Chestnut replacement in the southern highlands.  Ecology 36(2):  352-353.\r\n\r\nNowacki, Gregory J. and M.D. Abrams.  2008. The demise of fire and ‘‘mesophication’’ of forests in the eastern United States. BioScience 58:  123–138.\r\n\r\nOlson, David F. , Jr. 1959. Site index curves for upland oak in the southeast. USDA, Forest Service. Southeastern Forest Experiment Station Research Note 125.\r\n\r\nPrice, Katie, C.R. Jackson, and A.J. Parker.  2010.  Variation of surficial soil hydraulic properties across land uses in the southern Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina, USA.  Journal of Hydrology 383:  256-268.\r\n\r\nRhodes, G. Neil Jr., and W.P. Phillips Jr.  2012.  PB1801 Weed Management in Pastures and Hay Crops, http://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_agexcrop/157. \r\n\r\nSchlaegel, Bryce E., D.L. Kulow, and R.N. Baughman.  1969.  Empirical yield tables for West Virginia yellow poplar.  West Virginia University Agriculture Experiment Station Bulletin 574T.\r\n\r\nSmith, David W.  1968.  Vegetational changes in a five county area of east Tennessee during secondary succession.  M.S. Thesis.  The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.\r\n \r\nSmith, David W. 1995. The southern Appalachian hardwood region. Regional Silviculture of the United States. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. New York, NY, 643, 173-225.\r\n\r\nSteckel, Larry and N. Rhodes.  2007.  Perilla mint.  University of Tennessee Extension Service publication W135.\r\n\r\nStephenson, Steven L., H.S. Adams, and M.L. Lipford. 1991. The present distribution of American chestnut in the upland forest communities of Virginia. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 118:24-32.\r\n\r\nSwank, Wayne T., J.M. Vose, and K.J. Elliott.  2001. Long-term hydrologic and water quality responses following commercial clearcutting of mixed hardwoods on a southern Appalachian catchment.  Forest Ecology and Management 143:  163 - 178.\r\n\r\nTennessee Forest Products Bulletin.  July - September, 2013.  Volume 39(3).  \r\n\r\nThor, Eyvind and D.D. Summers.  1971.  Changes in forest composition on Big Ridge Natural Study Area, Union County, Tennessee. Castanea 36:  114-122.\r\n\r\nThornthwaite, Charles W.  1948.  An approach toward a rational classification of climate.  Geographical Review 38(1):  55-94.\r\n\r\nUnited States Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service.  1992.  Hardwood forest grazing.  Woodland Fact Sheet No. 7. Columbia, Missouri. \r\n\r\nWilliams, Samuel C.  1928.  Early travels in the Tennessee country, 1540-1800: With introductions, annotations and index. The Watauga Press, Johnson City, Tennessee.\r\n",
            "acknowledgments": ""
        },
        "localityList": [],
        "inventoryReferences": [],
        "citations": [],
        "contributors": [
            "Belinda Esham"
        ],
        "approval": {
            "approver": "",
            "publicationDate": ""
        },
        "certifications": []
    },
    "referenceSheet": {
        "authors": "",
        "authorContact": "",
        "date": "",
        "compositionMetric": "Annual Production",
        "litterCover": "",
        "litterDepth": "",
        "narratives": {
            "rills": "",
            "waterFlow": "",
            "erosionalPedestals": "",
            "bareGround": "",
            "gullies": "",
            "windErosion": "",
            "litterMovement": "",
            "soilStability": "",
            "soilStructure": "",
            "plantEffects": "",
            "soilCompaction": "",
            "funGroupDominant": "",
            "funGroupSubdominant": "",
            "funGroupOther": "",
            "funGroupNotes": "",
            "plantMortality": "",
            "litterNotes": "",
            "annualProduction": "",
            "invasiveSpecies": "",
            "reproductiveCapacity": ""
        },
        "otherIndicators": [],
        "approver": "",
        "publicationDate": ""
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
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Class description overview

This service returns a JSON file of ecological class description overview data.

Availability
                  All catalogs
                
Path
                  /services/descriptions/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/overview.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
generalInformation General information description data
generalInformation.catalogSymbol Data catalog symbol
generalInformation.geoDataName Geographic data set name
generalInformation.geoUnitSymbol Geographic unit symbol
generalInformation.geoUnitName Geographic unit name
generalInformation.ecoclassId Ecological class ID
generalInformation.ecoclassLegacyId Ecological class legacy ID
generalInformation.ecoclassName Ecological class name
generalInformation.publishDate Most recent description publish date
generalInformation.developmentStage Development stage
generalInformation.keyCriteria Key criteria
generalInformation.subclasses Subclasses
generalInformation.subclasses.classification Ecological classification name
generalInformation.subclasses.classification.catalogSymbol Catalog symbol
generalInformation.subclasses.classification.classes Subclasses
generalInformation.subclasses.classification.classes.geoUnitSymbol Subclass geographic unit symbol
generalInformation.subclasses.classification.classes.symbol Subclass symbol
generalInformation.subclasses.classification.classes.name Subclass name
generalInformation.subclasses.classification.classes.label Subclass label
generalInformation.contributors Contributors
generalInformation.citations Literature citations
generalInformation.narratives General information narratives
generalInformation.narratives.physiographicFeatures Physiographic features narrative
generalInformation.narratives.climaticFeatures Climatic features narrative
generalInformation.narratives.soilFeatures Soil features narrative
generalInformation.narratives.ecologicalDynamics Ecological dynamics narrative
generalInformation.model State and transition model data
generalInformation.model.images Custom state and transition model diagrams
generalInformation.model.images.path Image path
generalInformation.model.images.orientation Image orientation
generalInformation.model.images.caption Image caption
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/overview.json
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "generalInformation": {
        "catalogSymbol": "esd",
        "geoDataName": "Major Land Resource Area (MLRA)",
        "geoUnitSymbol": "128X",
        "geoUnitName": "Southern Appalachian Ridges and Valleys",
        "ecoclassId": "F128XY001TN",
        "ecoclassLegacyId": "F128XY001TN",
        "ecoclassName": "Thermic Cherty Dolomite Upland Oak-Hickory Forest",
        "publicationDate": "02/11/2020",
        "developmentStage": "Approved",
        "keyCriteria": [],
        "subclasses": [],
        "contributors": [
            "Belinda Esham"
        ],
        "citations": [],
        "narratives": {
            "physiographicFeatures": "This ecological site occurs on summits, shoulders, and backslopes on dissected uplands weathered from cherty dolomitic limestone.  Slopes are 2 to 60 percent.  Elevation ranges from 500 to 2,130 feet.  The topography ranges from ridges to rolling hills.\r\n\r\nThis site can generate runoff to adjacent, downslope ecological sites.  This site does not flood.  \r\n",
            "climaticFeatures": "This area falls under the humid, mesothermal climate classification (Thornwaite, 1948).  Precipitation is fairly evenly distributed throughout the year, with little or no water deficiency during any season.  The average annual precipitation in most of this area is 45 to 55 inches.  It increases to the south.  Maximum precipitation occurs in midwinter and midsummer, and the minimum occurs in autumn.  Most rainfall occurs as high-intensity, convective thunderstorms.  Snowfall may occur in winter.  Average annual temperatures range from 46 to 70 degrees F, increasing to the south.  The freeze-free period averages 205 days and is longest in the southern part of the area and shortest at higher elevations to the north.  The growing season corresponds to climate.  Local climate can be variable and microclimates factor into the distribution of plants.  In general, topographic features such as slope aspect, landform, steepness, and position of the ridges and valleys are important site variables in the distribution of vegetation across the landscape (Martin, 1989).",
            "soilFeatures": "This ecological site is represented by soils in the Ultisols soil order. Major soil series for this ecological site are Pailo, Bodine, Fullerton, and Minvale. Map units having these soils as both major and minor components, either in consociations or complexes, make up the majority of the ecological site.  These soils have a thermic temperature regime and an udic moisture regime.  They are extremely deep, well drained, highly weathered, and acidic.  Soils associated with this ecological site formed in colluvium or soil creep, over the underlying residuum from cherty dolomitic limestone and from residuum from cherty dolomitic limestone.  \r\n\r\nIn general, Ultisols are formed from parent materials that contain small amounts of basic cations.  The Ultisols in this ecological site description are derived from cherty dolomitic limestone.  In weathering, the dolomite produces silica. The silica accumulates in the soil as chert.  Chert produced during weathering is generally porous and cavernous, but in some areas, it is massive. Water availability generally goes down as the percentage of chert goes up (Martin 1989).  This can affect the local distribution of plant species within this site.  Being silica based, the reaction of soils weathered from cherty dolomitic limestone range from strongly acid to extremely strongly acid in the particle size control section. Soils weathering from the cherty dolomitic limestone have mineralogy from siliceous to kaolinitic.  The particle size family for these soils includes fine-loamy, loamy-skeletal, and fine. Drainage classes for the selected soil series are well drained and somewhat excessively drained.   \r\n\r\nThe parent materials and landforms in this physiographic province are geologically old.  These soils have become highly weathered and leached over time due to the age of parent materials, thermic temperature regime and udic moisture regime, leaving soils with a naturally low nutrient content, low base status, and high subsoil acidity. These become limitations from an agricultural and timber standpoint but can be easily overcome by adequate application of lime, fertilizer, and use of best management practices (Buol et al., 1997).",
            "ecologicalDynamics": "The information contained in the state and transition model (STM) and the ecological site description was developed using archeological and historical data, professional experience, and scientific studies.  The information presented is representative of a very complex set of plant communities.  Not all scenarios or plants are included.  Key indicator plants, animals, and ecological processes are described to inform land management decisions.  \r\n\r\nThe historic reference plant community phase of the Cherty Dolomite Upland is perceived to be a mixed hardwood forest, dominated by oaks and hickories now.  Prior to the decimation of the American chestnut (Castanea dentata) by the chestnut blight, that species would have been important.  White oak (Quercus alba), pignut hickory (Carya glabra), northern red oak (Quercus rubra) and tuliptree (Liriodendron tulipifera) most commonly occur in the canopy of forest stands although a multitude of other hardwood and some pine tree species can occur to varying degrees across the landscape.  For example, chestnut oak (Quercus prinus) commonly assumes dominance on drier ridgetop positions (Condley 1984).  Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) can be important toward the southern extent of the MLRA.    \r\n\r\nThe forests of today are likely the result of a series of complex disturbances including the loss of American chestnut in the 1930s (Thor and Summers 1971) (Nelson 1955), broad-scale and intense land-use change, fire and fire suppression, highly dynamic wildlife populations and a substantial climatic shift toward increased moisture availability (McEwan et al. 2011).  They are forests in transition as the often dense mid-story of sugar maple (Acer saccharum), red maple (Acer rubrum) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia) indicates (McEwan et al. 2011).  These mesophytic species are capable of achieving dominance and that species composition shift has become a concern, especially in relation to forestry and wildlife impacts.  Other mid-story trees include flowering dogwood (Cornus florida), pawpaw (Asimina triloba), sourwood (Oxydendrum arboreum ), and eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis).  \r\n\r\nThe forest understory includes native vines, ferns, and herbs including Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia), eastern poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia), greenbriar (Smilax spp.), littlebrownjug (Hexastylis arifolia), mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum), feathery false lily of the valley (Maianthemum racemosum), yellow wakerobin (Trillium luteum), and Christmas fern (Polystichum acrostichoides).  Tree regeneration also represents a percentage of the understory, with the maples and American beech occurring most commonly (Hart et al. 2008).  \r\n\r\nMost species associated with this site are generalists and demonstrate wide ecological amplitude to tolerate a variety of environmental conditions but a few are more limited.  In general, soil moisture is the single most important factor for plant growth and plant species occur along a moisture gradient determined by topographic factors such as aspect, slope shape, slope inclination, and slope position (Martin 1971).  Typically, chestnut oak forest communities dominate ridgetops; white oak – black oak (Quercus velutina) communities are found on drier, exposed slopes.  Tuliptree prefers small depressions and receiving positions; shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata) and Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) occur sporadically, typically on more exposed positions.  Northern red oak seems to prefer midslope positions.  Scarlet oak (Quercus coccinea) is found often on warmer, drier positions.  Understory diversity tends to increase on north-facing slopes (contingent on past land use) and on lower slope positions and decrease on ridges and exposed south-facing slopes.  \r\n\r\nSouth of this site, equivalent soils produce oak-pine dominated forests indicating that latitude does affect species distribution (Martin 1989) and production (Condley 1984) within the major land resource area.  \r\n\r\nThere is strong evidence to suggest that humankind has occupied the ridge and valley and interacted with the land for the past 10,000 years or more (Chapman, 1982).  Native American population demographics changed over time, as did the type and intensity of their land use practices.  It is likely that land clearance and cultivation over the last several thousand years increased the amount of forest edge considerably (Chapman, 1982).  The exact mechanisms of this change prior to European settlement are unclear, but there is little doubt that American Indians were cultivating crops, cutting trees to use for fuel wood and building materials, planting orchards for fruit and nut production, and using prescribed fire to clear land for settlement and open the forest for hunting.  The effects of their management practices were probably highly variable across the landscape and intermediate in scale.  The best available studies suggest that due to the land use practices of Native Americans in this general region, oaks and chestnuts became dominant on upper slopes, fire-adapted pines established on ridges, and disturbance-adapted hardwoods colonized old fields (Delcourt, 1998).     \r\n\r\nAfter European settlement and expansion in the early 1800’s, land use changed drastically both in terms of type and intensity.  The early pioneers used the forests for food for themselves and their livestock in addition to cutting wood for fuel, shelter, etc.  A common practice was to use forested ridges for pasture.  They also cleared forests for habitation, pastures, and fields.  As industrialization occurred and people moved into more urban areas, many of the pastures and fields were abandoned and reverted to forest.  These forests are now largely occupied by low-quality, mixed hardwood-pine and small-sawtimber size hardwood stands (Smith, 1995).  \r\n\r\nIn addition to forest clearing for small settlement farms, the forests of this area were extensively logged in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, before the advent of modern forestry and soil conservation practices.  During this time, boomtowns sprang up around lumber mills and railroads were built to accommodate the trade.  Termed “the Big Cut” by local foresters, this period in history resulted in probably the most significant forest disturbance to date.  Almost all forests in this region were impacted to some degree and stands which exhibit old-growth characteristics are extremely rare today.\r\n\r\nDestructive fires often followed poor logging practices, killing young stands, damaging older tree trunks and causing heavy losses in soil fertility.  However, while fire prevention and suppression programs in the 1930’s decreased the loss of forest resources to wildfire, it also impacted forest dynamics significantly (Smith, 1995).  The role of fire in the greater Southern Appalachian Hardwood region as a whole (which encompasses this ecological site) is not well understood and research into the complex relationship between fire and oak forests is emerging (Arthur et al. 2012).\r\n\r\nAnother important disturbance in the eastern forest was the loss of the American chestnut to the exotic chestnut blight fungus in the early 1900’s.  It had moved through Tennessee, killing most chestnut trees by 1930 (Hart, 2008).  It is widely accepted that chestnut was replaced by oak and hickory species, especially in upland areas; although, other species including red maple would also have benefited (Keever, 1953; Stephenson et al., 1991).  \r\n\r\nMost oak species would likely also have responded favorably to the heavy disturbances caused by logging and fire in the early years of settlement.  The combined result is the heavily oak-hickory dominated forests common on upland sites today.   \r\n\r\nPresent-day disturbances include poor logging practices such as high-grading or diameter-limit cutting, which selects higher-quality trees for extraction and leaves defective or unhealthy trees.  This results in forest stands that are degraded in terms of genetics, species composition, forest health, and timber quality.  Most stands in this ecological site have been high-graded multiple times.  \r\n\r\nInvasive exotic pest plant species are negatively impacting the overall health of forested stands.  Plant species of concern in forests include tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima), Asian bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus), autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellate var, parviflora), bicolor lespedeza (Lespedeza bicolor), the exotic privets (Ligustrum spp.), princess tree (Paulownia tomentosa), kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata), multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora), and the exotic honeysuckles (Lonicera spp.).  Forests are particularly susceptible to exotic plant invasion after a disturbance, which further complicates management decisions.  In general, in the South, invasive exotic plants should be considered in nearly every management scenario. \r\n\r\nThe Tennessee Division of Forestry lists four major areas of concern for forest pests:  gypsy moth, southern pine beetle, oak decline, and dogwood anthracnose.  All of these could be significant threats to the health of forests associated with this ecological site.  The recently detected thousand cankers disease and emerald ash borer pose new threats to black walnut (Juglans nigra) and ash species (Fraxinus spp.), respectively.\r\n\r\nA state and transition model for the Thermic Cherty Dolomite Upland ecological site follows this narrative.  Thorough descriptions of each state, transition, plant community, and pathway follow the model.  Experts base this model on available experimental research, field observations, professional consensus, and interpretations.  It is likely to change as knowledge increases.  \r\n\r\nPlant communities will differ across the major land resource area because of the naturally occurring variability in weather, soils, and aspect.  The Reference Plant Community is not necessarily the management goal.  The biological processes on this site are complex.  Therefore, representative values are presented in a land management context.  The species lists are representative and are not botanical descriptions of all species occurring, or potentially occurring, on this site.  They are not intended to cover every situation or the full range of conditions, species, and responses for the site.  \r\n\r\nThe following diagram suggests pathways that the vegetation on these sites will most likely take, given the above general descriptions of climate, soils, and disturbance histories. Specific areas with unique soils and disturbance histories may have alternative pathways not shown on this diagram. This information is intended to show what might happen given average site conditions and a history of repeated disturbances as described above. Local professional guidance should always be sought before pursuing a treatment scenario."
        },
        "model": {
            "images": [
                {
                    "caption": "Thermic Cherty Dolomite Upland",
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/es/14926.jpg"
                },
                {
                    "caption": "Thermic Cherty Dolomite Upland STM Legend",
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/es/14970.jpg"
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Class list

This service returns a JSON file of ecological classes for the specified catalog and geographic unit. The list can be filtered by adding one or more optional query parameter to the service call.

Availability
                  All catalogs
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/class-list.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
precipitation query optional Colon-delimited tuple of mimimum and maximum mean annual precipitation in millimeters
frostFreeDays query optional Colon-delimited tuple of mimimum and maximum frost free days
elevation query optional Colon-delimited tuple of mimimum and maximum elevation in meters
slope query optional Colon-delimited tuple of mimimum and maximum percent slope
landform query optional Pipe-delimited list of landform types (see USDA Soil Survey documentation for valid options)
parentMaterialOrigin query optional Pipe-delimited list of parent material origin types (see USDA Soil Survey documentation for valid options)
parentMaterialKind query optional Pipe-delimited list of parent material kind types (see USDA Soil Survey documentation for valid options)
surfaceTexture query optional Pipe-delimited list of surface texture types (see USDA Soil Survey documentation for valid options)
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
ecoclasses List of ecological classes
ecoclasses.geoUnit Geographic unit symbol
ecoclasses.id Ecological class ID
ecoclasses.legacyId Ecological class legacy ID
ecoclasses.name Ecological class name
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/class-list.json
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/class-list.json?slope=15:30&landform=mountain slope|ridge
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "ecoclasses": [
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XA001NM",
            "legacyId": "F039XA001NM",
            "name": "Pseudotsuga menziesii-Populus tremuloides/Quercus gambelii-Robinia neomexicana/Poa fendleriana"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XA002NM",
            "legacyId": "F039XA002NM",
            "name": "Pinus ponderosa-Pseudotsuga menziesii/Quercus gambelii-Cercocarpus montanus/Poa fendleriana"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XA003NM",
            "legacyId": "F039XA003NM",
            "name": "Pinus edulis-Juniperus scopulorum/Quercus gambelii/Bouteloua gracilis"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XA004NM",
            "legacyId": "F039XA004NM",
            "name": "Pinus ponderosa-Juniperus deppeana/Quercus gambelii/Festuca arizonica"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XA007NM",
            "legacyId": "F039XA007NM",
            "name": "Montane slopes 12-18\""
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XA102AZ",
            "legacyId": "F039XA102AZ",
            "name": "Clay Loam Upland 17-22\" p.z. (PIPO)"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XA110AZ",
            "legacyId": "F039XA110AZ",
            "name": "Limestone Hills 17-22\" p.z. (PIPO, JUDE2)"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XA111AZ",
            "legacyId": "F039XA111AZ",
            "name": "Loamy Upland 17-22\" p.z. (PIPO)"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XA124AZ",
            "legacyId": "F039XA124AZ",
            "name": "Sandy Loam 17-22\" p.z. Steep (PIPO, POTR5)"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XA132AZ",
            "legacyId": "F039XA132AZ",
            "name": "Cinder Upland 17-22\" p.z. (QUGA, PIPO)"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XA133AZ",
            "legacyId": "F039XA133AZ",
            "name": "Basalt Upland 17-22\" p.z. (PIPO)"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XA134AZ",
            "legacyId": "F039XA134AZ",
            "name": "Limestone Upland 17-22\" p.z. (PIPO)"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XA135AZ",
            "legacyId": "F039XA135AZ",
            "name": "Basalt Hills 17-22\" p.z. (PIPO, QUGA)"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XA136AZ",
            "legacyId": "F039XA136AZ",
            "name": "Cinder Hills 17-22\" p.z. (PIPO, QUGA)"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XB101NM",
            "legacyId": "F039XB101NM",
            "name": "Pinus edulis-Juniperus scopulorum/Quercus gambelii"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XB102NM",
            "legacyId": "F039XB102NM",
            "name": "Juniperus monosperma-Pinus edulis/Bouteloua gracilis"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XB103NM",
            "legacyId": "F039XB103NM",
            "name": "Mesa Hills/Slopes 12-19"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XB104NM",
            "legacyId": "F039XB104NM",
            "name": "Pinus ponderosa-Juniperus scopulorum/Quercus gambelii-Symphoricarpos albus/Festuca arizonica-Poa fendleriana"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XB105NM",
            "legacyId": "F039XB105NM",
            "name": "Pseudotsuga menziesii-Pinus ponderosa/Symphoricarpos albus"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "F039XB107NM",
            "legacyId": "F039XB107NM",
            "name": "Shallow Hills 13-16 inches"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA011NM",
            "legacyId": "R039XA011NM",
            "name": "Meadow"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA012NM",
            "legacyId": "R039XA012NM",
            "name": "Pine Grassland"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA013NM",
            "legacyId": "R039XA013NM",
            "name": "Mountain Malpais"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA014NM",
            "legacyId": "R039XA014NM",
            "name": "Stony Loam"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA015NM",
            "legacyId": "R039XA015NM",
            "name": "Mountain Upland 14 to 18 inches"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA016NM",
            "legacyId": "R039XA016NM",
            "name": "Shallow Hills"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA019NM",
            "legacyId": "R039XA019NM",
            "name": "Shallow Savanna 14-18"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA103AZ",
            "legacyId": "R039XA103AZ",
            "name": "Clayey Upland 17-22\" p.z."
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA104AZ",
            "legacyId": "R039XA104AZ",
            "name": "Loamy Upland 17-22\" p.z."
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA105AZ",
            "legacyId": "R039XA105AZ",
            "name": "Shallow Loamy 17-22\" p.z."
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA106AZ",
            "legacyId": "R039XA106AZ",
            "name": "Stony Upland 17-22\" p.z."
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA107AZ",
            "legacyId": "R039XA107AZ",
            "name": "Cinder Hills 17-22\" p.z."
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA108AZ",
            "legacyId": "R039XA108AZ",
            "name": "Meadow 17-22\" p.z."
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA109AZ",
            "legacyId": "R039XA109AZ",
            "name": "Wet Meadow 22-30\" p.z."
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA121AZ",
            "legacyId": "R039XA121AZ",
            "name": "Loamy Upland 22-30\" p.z."
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA122AZ",
            "legacyId": "R039XA122AZ",
            "name": "Shallow Loamy 22-30\" p.z."
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA129AZ",
            "legacyId": "R039XA129AZ",
            "name": "Clay Bottom 17-22\""
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA130AZ",
            "legacyId": "R039XA130AZ",
            "name": "Loamy Bottom 17-22\" p.z."
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XA138AZ",
            "legacyId": "R039XA138AZ",
            "name": "Clay Loam Upland 17-22 p.z."
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XB050NM",
            "legacyId": "R039XB050NM",
            "name": "Mountain Grassland"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XB051NM",
            "legacyId": "R039XB051NM",
            "name": "Mountain Meadow"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XB052NM",
            "legacyId": "R039XB052NM",
            "name": "Mountain Valley"
        },
        {
            "geoUnit": "039X",
            "id": "R039XB056NM",
            "legacyId": "R039XB056NM",
            "name": "Loamy"
        }
    ]
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Climatic features description

This service returns a JSON file of climatic features data for the specified ecological class. Data for all description sections can be obtained using the Class Description web service.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/descriptions/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/climatic-features.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
measurementSystem query optional Measurement system ("usc" or "metric"). Default is "usc".
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
climaticFeatures Climatic features description data
climaticFeatures.narratives Climatic features narratives
climaticFeatures.narratives.climaticFeatures Climatic features narrative
climaticFeatures.narratives.climateSources Climate sources narrative
climaticFeatures.map Mean annual precipitation normals
climaticFeatures.map.representativeLow Mean annual precipitation representative low
climaticFeatures.map.representativeHigh Mean annual precipitation representative high
climaticFeatures.map.rangeLow Mean annual precipitation range low
climaticFeatures.map.rangeHigh Mean annual precipitation range high
climaticFeatures.frostFreeDays Frost free day normals
climaticFeatures.frostFreeDays.representativeLow Frost free days representative low
climaticFeatures.frostFreeDays.representativeHigh Frost free days representative high
climaticFeatures.frostFreeDays.rangeLow Frost free days range low
climaticFeatures.frostFreeDays.rangeHigh Frost free days range high
climaticFeatures.freezeFreeDays Freeze free day normals
climaticFeatures.freezeFreeDays.representativeLow Freeze free days representative low
climaticFeatures.freezeFreeDays.representativeHigh Freeze free days representative high
climaticFeatures.freezeFreeDays.rangeLow Freeze free days range low
climaticFeatures.freezeFreeDays.rangeHigh Freeze free days range high
climaticFeatures.normalsRVCount Number of non-empty climate normals representative value entries
climaticFeatures.normalsRangeCount Number of non-empty climate normals range entries
climaticFeatures.monthlyPrec Monthly total precipitation normals
climaticFeatures.monthlyPrec.representativeLow.{monthNumber} Monthly total precipitation representative low
climaticFeatures.monthlyPrec.representativeHigh.{monthNumber} Monthly total precipitation representative high
climaticFeatures.monthlyPrec.rangeLow.{monthNumber} Monthly total precipitation range low
climaticFeatures.monthlyPrec.rangeHigh.{monthNumber} Monthly total precipitation range high
climaticFeatures.monthlyTmin Monthly average minimum temperature
climaticFeatures.monthlyTmin.representativeLow.{monthNumber} Monthly average minimum temperature representative low
climaticFeatures.monthlyTmin.representativeHigh.{monthNumber} Monthly average minimum temperature representative high
climaticFeatures.monthlyTmin.rangeLow.{monthNumber} Monthly average minimum temperature range low
climaticFeatures.monthlyTmin.rangeHigh.{monthNumber} Monthly average minimum temperature range high
climaticFeatures.monthlyTmax Monthly average maximum temperature
climaticFeatures.monthlyTmax.representativeLow.{monthNumber} Monthly average maximum temperature representative low
climaticFeatures.monthlyTmax.representativeHigh.{monthNumber} Monthly average maximum temperature representative high
climaticFeatures.monthlyTmax.rangeLow.{monthNumber} Monthly average maximum temperature range low
climaticFeatures.monthlyTmax.rangeHigh.{monthNumber} Monthly average maximum temperature range high
climaticFeatures.climatePattern Long term climate pattern data
climaticFeatures.climatePattern.map Climate pattern mean annual precipitation
climaticFeatures.climatePattern.tavg Climate pattern average annual temperature
climaticFeatures.climatePattern.year Climate pattern year
climaticFeatures.stations Stations used to help produce the ecological class climatic description
climaticFeatures.stations.location Climate station location
climaticFeatures.stations.stationID Climate station ID
climaticFeatures.stations.stationName Climate station name
precipitationUnit Precipitation measurement unit
temperatureUnit Temperature measurement unit
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/climatic-features.json
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/climatic-features.json?measurementSystem=metric
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "climaticFeatures": {
        "narratives": {
            "climaticFeatures": "This area falls under the humid, mesothermal climate classification (Thornwaite, 1948).  Precipitation is fairly evenly distributed throughout the year, with little or no water deficiency during any season.  The average annual precipitation in most of this area is 45 to 55 inches.  It increases to the south.  Maximum precipitation occurs in midwinter and midsummer, and the minimum occurs in autumn.  Most rainfall occurs as high-intensity, convective thunderstorms.  Snowfall may occur in winter.  Average annual temperatures range from 46 to 70 degrees F, increasing to the south.  The freeze-free period averages 205 days and is longest in the southern part of the area and shortest at higher elevations to the north.  The growing season corresponds to climate.  Local climate can be variable and microclimates factor into the distribution of plants.  In general, topographic features such as slope aspect, landform, steepness, and position of the ridges and valleys are important site variables in the distribution of vegetation across the landscape (Martin, 1989).",
            "climateSources": ""
        },
        "map": {
            "representativeLow": "",
            "representativeHigh": "",
            "rangeLow": "",
            "rangeHigh": "",
            "average": 53
        },
        "frostFreeDays": {
            "representativeLow": "",
            "representativeHigh": "",
            "rangeLow": "",
            "rangeHigh": "",
            "average": 172
        },
        "freezeFreeDays": {
            "representativeLow": "",
            "representativeHigh": "",
            "rangeLow": "",
            "rangeHigh": "",
            "average": 195
        },
        "normalsRVCount": 0,
        "normalsRangeCount": 0,
        "monthlyPrec": {
            "representativeLow": {
                "1": 3.7,
                "2": 3.1,
                "3": 4,
                "4": 2.9,
                "5": 3.4,
                "6": 2.8,
                "7": 3,
                "8": 2.4,
                "9": 2.4,
                "10": 1.8,
                "11": 3.3,
                "12": 3.2
            },
            "representativeHigh": {
                "1": 6,
                "2": 5.3,
                "3": 6.8,
                "4": 5,
                "5": 5.5,
                "6": 5.1,
                "7": 5.1,
                "8": 4.1,
                "9": 4.8,
                "10": 3.8,
                "11": 5.2,
                "12": 5.7
            },
            "rangeLow": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "rangeHigh": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "average": {
                "1": 0,
                "2": 0,
                "3": 0,
                "4": 0,
                "5": 0,
                "6": 0,
                "7": 0,
                "8": 0,
                "9": 0,
                "10": 0,
                "11": 0,
                "12": 0
            }
        },
        "monthlyTmin": {
            "representativeLow": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "representativeHigh": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "rangeLow": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "rangeHigh": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "average": {
                "1": 27,
                "2": 30,
                "3": 36,
                "4": 44,
                "5": 54,
                "6": 63,
                "7": 67,
                "8": 65,
                "9": 58,
                "10": 46,
                "11": 37,
                "12": 29
            }
        },
        "monthlyTmax": {
            "representativeLow": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "representativeHigh": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "rangeLow": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "rangeHigh": {
                "1": "",
                "2": "",
                "3": "",
                "4": "",
                "5": "",
                "6": "",
                "7": "",
                "8": "",
                "9": "",
                "10": "",
                "11": "",
                "12": ""
            },
            "average": {
                "1": 48,
                "2": 53,
                "3": 62,
                "4": 71,
                "5": 78,
                "6": 85,
                "7": 88,
                "8": 88,
                "9": 82,
                "10": 72,
                "11": 61,
                "12": 50
            }
        },
        "climatePattern": [
            {
                "year": 1981,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1982,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1983,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1984,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1985,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1986,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1987,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1988,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1989,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1991,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1992,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1993,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1994,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1995,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1996,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1997,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1998,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 1999,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2000,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2001,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2002,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2003,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2004,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2005,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2006,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2007,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2008,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2009,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            },
            {
                "year": 2010,
                "map": 0,
                "tavg": ""
            }
        ],
        "stations": [],
        "precipitationUnit": "in",
        "temperatureUnit": "°F"
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Ecological dynamics description

This service returns a JSON file of ecological dynamics data for the specified ecological class. Data for all description sections can be obtained using the Class Description web service. Web services for individual plant community data elements are also available.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/descriptions/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/ecological-dynamics.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
measurementSystem query optional Measurement system ("usc" or "metric"). Default is "usc".
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
ecologicalDynamics Ecological dynamics description data
ecologicalDynamics.narratives Ecological dynamics description narratives
ecologicalDynamics.narratives.ecologicalDynamics Ecological dynamics narrative
ecologicalDynamics.images Custom state and transition model diagrams
ecologicalDynamics.images.path Image path
ecologicalDynamics.images.orientation Image orientation
ecologicalDynamics.images.caption Image caption
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/042X/R042XB010NM/ecological-dynamics.json
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/042X/R042XB010NM/ecological-dynamics.json?measurementSystem=metric
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "ecologicalDynamics": {
        "narratives": {
            "ecologicalDynamics": "Overview:\r\n\r\nThis ecological site may exist with inclusions of gravelly sand, gravelly loam, or sandy ecological sites. On bajadas,\r\nit often grades into gravelly loam and loamy ecological sites. The presence of a shallow petrocalcic layer in this site\r\nlimits productivity and is an important aspect of its ecology. As currently defined, the gravelly site exhibits a high\r\ndegree of topographic diversity. The historic plant community type is generally assumed to exhibit co-dominance\r\nbetween grasses, including black grama (Bouteloua eriopoda) and bush muhly (Muhlenbergia porteri), and shrubs\r\nand half-shrubs, chiefly creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) and mariola (Parthenium incanum). Due to variation in\r\naspect, slope, landscape position, and subsurface soil properties, there is likely to have been considerable variation\r\nin historic plant communities within and among gravelly soil series. In cases where natural erosional slopes occur\r\nalong bajadas (e.g. the erosional fan remnant of the fan piedmont landform; Wondzell et al. 1996), creosotebush\r\nmay have dominated plant communities since pre-colonization times (Stein and Ludwig 1979). In the upper fan\r\ncollar near the base of desert mountains, on the other hand, runon water to loamy-skeletal soils may currently\r\nsupport black-grama dominated communities with few shrubs.\r\nTransitions from mixed shrub grasslands to a mixed shrub-dominated state may be catalyzed by\r\novergrazing (Whitford et al. 2001) which reduces grass competition to shrubs. Drought and or fire suppression may\r\nalso be important factors although this has not been demonstrated. In these cases, creosotebush and tarbush\r\n(Flourensia cernua) may be climax species that, without disturbance, come to dominate on certain soils (Muller\r\n1940, McAuliffe 1994). Transitions to the shrubland state are associated with severe and persistent grass cover\r\nreduction, erosion, and soil truncation (Gile et al. 1998). Buffington and Herbel (1965) documented waves of\r\ninvasion and replacement among tarbush, honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), and creosotebush whose sequence\r\ndiffered on different gravelly soil series. Furthermore, there have been recent increases in whitethorn acacia (Acacia\r\nconstricta) with declines in creosotebush on some gravelly soils (Bestelmeyer, in preparation). The causes of\r\ncreosotebush encroachment throughout the southwest are potentially numerous. Together, the various studies of this\r\nshrub’s biology highlight the complexities involved in modeling and managing grassland conversion.\r\n\r\nDespite these studies, little quantitative information exists concerning the causes of transitions among states in SD-2.\r\nNo systematic studies exist regarding the effects of range management on grassland-shrubland transitions in the\r\ngravelly ecological site group. McAuliffe’s (1994) studies of creosotebush distribution in the Sonoran desert provide\r\nan interesting basis for comparative work in the Chihuahuan desert. Such broad-scale comparisons will provide\r\nimportant clues to the factors regulating creosotebush encroachment in SD-2."
        },
        "images": [
            {
                "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/es/5957.jpg",
                "orientation": "landscape",
                "caption": ""
            }
        ]
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

General information description

This service returns a JSON file of general information data for the specified ecological class. Data for all description sections can be obtained using the Class Description web service.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/descriptions/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/general-information.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
generalInformation General information description data
generalInformation.narratives General information narratives
generalInformation.narratives.ecoclassName Ecological class base name
generalInformation.narratives.ecoclassSecondaryName Ecological class secondary name
generalInformation.narratives.ecoclassTertiaryName Ecological class tertiary name
generalInformation.narratives.ecoclassConcept Ecological class concept narrative
generalInformation.narratives.mlraNotes MLRA notes narrative
generalInformation.narratives.lruNotes LRU notes narrative
generalInformation.narratives.classification Classification relationships narrative
generalInformation.images Images describing relationships among associated and similar ecological classes
generalInformation.images.path Image path
generalInformation.images.orientation Image orientation
generalInformation.images.caption Image caption
generalInformation.associatedSites Associated ecological classes
generalInformation.associatedSites.geoUnit Geographic unit ID of the associated ecological class
generalInformation.associatedSites.geoUnitSymbol Geographic unit symbol of the associated ecological class
generalInformation.associatedSites.id Associated ecological class ID
generalInformation.associatedSites.name Associated ecological class name
generalInformation.associatedSites.narrative Associated ecological class narrative
generalInformation.associatedSites.symbol Associated ecological class symbol
generalInformation.similarSites Similar ecological classes
generalInformation.similarSites.geoUnit Geographic unit ID of the similar ecological class
generalInformation.similarSites.geoUnitSymbol Geographic unit symbol of the similar ecological class
generalInformation.similarSites.id Similar ecological class ID
generalInformation.similarSites.name Similar ecological class name
generalInformation.similarSites.narrative Similar ecological class narrative
generalInformation.similarSites.symbol Similar ecological class symbol
generalInformation.correlatedStates US states correlated to the ecological class
generalInformation.dominantShrub1 Dominant shrub 1
generalInformation.dominantTree1 Dominant tree 1
generalInformation.dominantHerb1 Dominant herb 1
generalInformation.dominantTree2 Dominant tree 2
generalInformation.dominantShrub2 Dominant shrub 2
generalInformation.dominantHerb2 Dominant herb 2
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/general-information.json
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "generalInformation": {
        "narratives": {
            "ecoclassName": "Thermic Cherty Dolomite Upland Oak-Hickory Forest",
            "ecoclassSecondaryName": "",
            "ecoclassTertiaryName": "",
            "ecoclassConcept": "The Cherty Dolomite Upland Oak-Hickory Forest ecological site (in red) constitutes a high percentage of this MLRA.  This site is primarily forested with mixed hardwoods, currently dominated by oak and hickory.  It is characterized by rolling topography with gently sloping to very steep upland hills.  Ridges are typically wider and lower in elevation than other ridges in the MLRA.  Some of the oldest and most highly leached soils of the MLRA occur on this ecological site. ",
            "mlraNotes": "Major Land Resource Area (MLRA) 128, shown as the area shaded in gray on the accompanying figure, falls into the East and Central Farming and Forest Region.  This MLRA is in Tennessee (36 percent), Alabama (27 percent), Virginia (25 percent), and Georgia (12 percent). It makes up about 21,095 square miles (54,660 square kilometers). \r\n\r\nMost of this MLRA is in the Tennessee section of the Valley and Ridge province of the Appalachian Highlands. The thin stringers in the western part of the area are mostly in the Cumberland Plateau section of the Appalachian Plateaus province of the Appalachian Highlands.  A separate area of the MLRA in northern Alabama is in the Highland Rim section of the Interior Low Plateaus province of the Interior Plains. The western side of the area is dominantly hilly to very steep and is rougher and much steeper than the eastern side, much of which is rolling and hilly.  Elevation ranges from 660 feet (200 meters) near the southern end of the area to more than 2,400 feet (730 meters) in the part of the area in the western tip of Virginia. Some isolated linear mountain ridges rise to nearly 4,920 feet (1,500 meters) above sea level. \r\n\r\nThe MLRA is highly diversified. It has many parallel ridges, narrow intervening valleys, and large areas of low, irregular hills. The bedrock in this area consists of alternating beds of limestone, dolomite, shale, and sandstone of early Paleozoic age. Ridgetops are capped with more resistant carbonate and sandstone layers, and valleys have been eroded into the less resistant shale beds. These folded and faulted layers are at the southernmost extent of the Appalachian Mountains. The narrow river valleys are filled with unconsolidated deposits of clay, silt, sand, and gravel.",
            "lruNotes": "",
            "classification": "This site falls into the \"Southern Limestone/Dolomite Valleys and Low Rolling Hills\" ecoregional classification developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (Authors: Glenn Griffith, James Omernik, Sandra Azevedo).  \r\n\r\nThe USGS-based Southeast GAP Analysis Project classifies this area under two major forest types: South-Central Interior Mesophytic Forest (CES202.887) and Southern Ridge and Valley/Cumberland Dry Calcareous Forest (CES202.457).  "
        },
        "images": [],
        "correlatedStates": [
            "AL",
            "GA",
            "TN"
        ],
        "associatedSites": [],
        "similarSites": [],
        "dominantSpecies": {
            "dominantTree1": "Quercus alba",
            "dominantShrub1": "Cercis canadensis",
            "dominantHerb1": "Vitis rotundifolia",
            "dominantTree2": "Carya glabra",
            "dominantShrub2": "Oxydendrum arboreum",
            "dominantHerb2": "Polystichum acrostichoides"
        }
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Geographic unit list

This service returns a JSON file of geographic units for the specified catalog. The list can be filtered by adding one or more optional query parameter to the service call.

Availability
                  All catalogs
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/geo-unit-list.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
administrativeUnit query optional Administrative unit name. The list will include only those geographic units intersecting the administrative unit.
availability query optional Pipe-delimited list of availability types. Specify "class" to limit the list to only those geographic units having at least one published ecological class description. Specify "key" to limit the list to only those geographic units having at least one published ecological class key.
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
geoUnits List of geographic units
geoUnits.symbol Geographic unit symbol
geoUnits.name Geographic unit name
geoUnits.ecoclassCount Published ecological class count
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/geo-unit-list.json
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/geo-unit-list.json?administrativeUnit=Idaho
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "geoUnits": [
        {
            "symbol": "001X",
            "name": "Northern Pacific Coast Range, Foothills, and Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "002X",
            "name": "Willamette and Puget Sound Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 11
        },
        {
            "symbol": "003X",
            "name": "Olympic and Cascade Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 29
        },
        {
            "symbol": "004A",
            "name": "Sitka Spruce Belt",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "004B",
            "name": "Coastal Redwood Belt",
            "ecoclassCount": 25
        },
        {
            "symbol": "004X",
            "name": "California Coastal Redwood Belt",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "005X",
            "name": "Siskiyou-Trinity Area",
            "ecoclassCount": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "006X",
            "name": "Cascade Mountains, Eastern Slope",
            "ecoclassCount": 16
        },
        {
            "symbol": "007X",
            "name": "Columbia Basin",
            "ecoclassCount": 9
        },
        {
            "symbol": "008X",
            "name": "Columbia Plateau",
            "ecoclassCount": 10
        },
        {
            "symbol": "009X",
            "name": "Palouse and Nez Perce Prairies",
            "ecoclassCount": 45
        },
        {
            "symbol": "010A",
            "name": "Big and Little Wood River Footslopes and Plains (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "010X",
            "name": "Central Rocky and Blue Mountain Foothills",
            "ecoclassCount": 100
        },
        {
            "symbol": "011A",
            "name": "Central Snake River Plains (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "011B",
            "name": "Upper Snake River Plains (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "011X",
            "name": "Snake River Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 7
        },
        {
            "symbol": "012X",
            "name": "Lost River Valleys and Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "013X",
            "name": "Eastern Idaho Plateaus",
            "ecoclassCount": 43
        },
        {
            "symbol": "014X",
            "name": "Central California Coastal Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "015X",
            "name": "Central California Coast Range",
            "ecoclassCount": 28
        },
        {
            "symbol": "016X",
            "name": "California Delta",
            "ecoclassCount": 5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "017X",
            "name": "Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "018X",
            "name": "Sierra Nevada Foothills",
            "ecoclassCount": 9
        },
        {
            "symbol": "019X",
            "name": "Southern California Coastal Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "020X",
            "name": "Southern California Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 14
        },
        {
            "symbol": "021X",
            "name": "Klamath and Shasta Valleys and Basins",
            "ecoclassCount": 51
        },
        {
            "symbol": "022A",
            "name": "Sierra Nevada Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 52
        },
        {
            "symbol": "022B",
            "name": "Southern Cascade Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 44
        },
        {
            "symbol": "022X",
            "name": "Sierra Nevada Range",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "023X",
            "name": "Malheur High Plateau",
            "ecoclassCount": 55
        },
        {
            "symbol": "024X",
            "name": "Humboldt Area",
            "ecoclassCount": 46
        },
        {
            "symbol": "025X",
            "name": "Owyhee High Plateau",
            "ecoclassCount": 22
        },
        {
            "symbol": "026X",
            "name": "Carson Basin and Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "027X",
            "name": "Fallon-Lovelock Area",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "028A",
            "name": "Great Salt Lake Area",
            "ecoclassCount": 121
        },
        {
            "symbol": "028B",
            "name": "Central Nevada Basin and Range",
            "ecoclassCount": 46
        },
        {
            "symbol": "029X",
            "name": "Southern Nevada Basin and Range",
            "ecoclassCount": 53
        },
        {
            "symbol": "030X",
            "name": "Mojave Desert",
            "ecoclassCount": 123
        },
        {
            "symbol": "031X",
            "name": "Lower Colorado Desert",
            "ecoclassCount": 19
        },
        {
            "symbol": "032X",
            "name": "Northern Intermountain Desertic Basins",
            "ecoclassCount": 97
        },
        {
            "symbol": "033X",
            "name": "Semiarid Rocky Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "034A",
            "name": "Cool Central Desertic Basins and Plateaus",
            "ecoclassCount": 84
        },
        {
            "symbol": "034B",
            "name": "Warm Central Desertic Basins and Plateaus",
            "ecoclassCount": 54
        },
        {
            "symbol": "034X",
            "name": "Central Desertic Basins, Mountains, and Plateaus",
            "ecoclassCount": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "035X",
            "name": "Colorado Plateau",
            "ecoclassCount": 313
        },
        {
            "symbol": "036A",
            "name": "Western Mesas, Plateaus and Basins (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "036B",
            "name": "Western Plateaus and Plains (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "036X",
            "name": "Southwestern Plateaus, Mesas, and Foothills",
            "ecoclassCount": 51
        },
        {
            "symbol": "037X",
            "name": "San Juan River Valley Mesas and Plateaus",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "038X",
            "name": "Mogollon Transition",
            "ecoclassCount": 63
        },
        {
            "symbol": "039X",
            "name": "Arizona and New Mexico Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 43
        },
        {
            "symbol": "040X",
            "name": "Sonoran Basin and Range",
            "ecoclassCount": 69
        },
        {
            "symbol": "041X",
            "name": "Southeastern Arizona Basin and Range",
            "ecoclassCount": 81
        },
        {
            "symbol": "042A",
            "name": "Southern Desert Rio Grande Central Basin (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "042B",
            "name": "Southern Desert Basin and Range (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "042C",
            "name": "Southern Desert Pecos Basin (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "042X",
            "name": "Southern Desertic Basins, Plains, and Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 100
        },
        {
            "symbol": "043A",
            "name": "Northern Rocky Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 20
        },
        {
            "symbol": "043B",
            "name": "Central Rocky Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 129
        },
        {
            "symbol": "043C",
            "name": "Blue and Seven Devils Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "043X",
            "name": "Northern Rocky Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "044A",
            "name": "Northern Rocky Mountain Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "044B",
            "name": "Central Rocky Mountain Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 30
        },
        {
            "symbol": "044X",
            "name": "Northern Rocky Mountain Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "046X",
            "name": "Northern Rocky Mountain Foothills",
            "ecoclassCount": 45
        },
        {
            "symbol": "047X",
            "name": "Wasatch and Uinta Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 93
        },
        {
            "symbol": "048A",
            "name": "Southern Rocky Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 47
        },
        {
            "symbol": "048B",
            "name": "Southern Rocky Mountain Parks",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "049A",
            "name": "Southern Rocky Mountain Foothills (dry) (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "049B",
            "name": "Southern Rocky Mountain Foothills (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "049X",
            "name": "Southern Rocky Mountain Foothills",
            "ecoclassCount": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "051X",
            "name": "High Intermountain Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 11
        },
        {
            "symbol": "052X",
            "name": "Brown Glaciated Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 63
        },
        {
            "symbol": "053A",
            "name": "Northern Dark Brown Glaciated Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 12
        },
        {
            "symbol": "053B",
            "name": "Central Dark Brown Glaciated Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 21
        },
        {
            "symbol": "053C",
            "name": "Southern Dark Brown Glaciated Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 20
        },
        {
            "symbol": "054X",
            "name": "Rolling Soft Shale Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 23
        },
        {
            "symbol": "055A",
            "name": "Northern Black Glaciated Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "055B",
            "name": "Central Black Glaciated Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 22
        },
        {
            "symbol": "055C",
            "name": "Southern Black Glaciated Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 21
        },
        {
            "symbol": "056X",
            "name": "Red River Valley of the North",
            "ecoclassCount": 6
        },
        {
            "symbol": "057X",
            "name": "Northern Minnesota Gray Drift",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "058A",
            "name": "Northern Rolling High Plains, Northern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 43
        },
        {
            "symbol": "058B",
            "name": "Northern Rolling High Plains, Southern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 38
        },
        {
            "symbol": "058C",
            "name": "Northern Rolling High Plains, Northeastern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 9
        },
        {
            "symbol": "058D",
            "name": "Northern Rolling High Plains, Eastern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 25
        },
        {
            "symbol": "060A",
            "name": "Pierre Shale Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 28
        },
        {
            "symbol": "060B",
            "name": "Pierre Shale Plains, Northern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 11
        },
        {
            "symbol": "061X",
            "name": "Black Hills Foot Slopes",
            "ecoclassCount": 33
        },
        {
            "symbol": "062X",
            "name": "Black Hills",
            "ecoclassCount": 12
        },
        {
            "symbol": "063A",
            "name": "Northern Rolling Pierre Shale Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 25
        },
        {
            "symbol": "063B",
            "name": "Southern Rolling Pierre Shale Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 14
        },
        {
            "symbol": "064X",
            "name": "Mixed Sandy and Silty Tableland and Badlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 28
        },
        {
            "symbol": "065X",
            "name": "Nebraska Sand Hills",
            "ecoclassCount": 17
        },
        {
            "symbol": "066X",
            "name": "Dakota-Nebraska Eroded Tableland",
            "ecoclassCount": 17
        },
        {
            "symbol": "067A",
            "name": "Central High Plains, Northern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 20
        },
        {
            "symbol": "067B",
            "name": "Central High Plains, Southern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 24
        },
        {
            "symbol": "067X",
            "name": "Central High Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "069X",
            "name": "Upper Arkansas Valley Rolling Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 19
        },
        {
            "symbol": "070A",
            "name": "Canadian River Plains and Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 25
        },
        {
            "symbol": "070B",
            "name": "Upper Pecos River Valley",
            "ecoclassCount": 26
        },
        {
            "symbol": "070C",
            "name": "Central New Mexico Highlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 29
        },
        {
            "symbol": "070D",
            "name": "Southern Desert Foothills",
            "ecoclassCount": 9
        },
        {
            "symbol": "070E",
            "name": "Upper Pecos Canadian Breaks and Terraces (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "070X",
            "name": "Pecos-Canadian Plains and Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "071X",
            "name": "Central Nebraska Loess Hills",
            "ecoclassCount": 11
        },
        {
            "symbol": "072X",
            "name": "Central High Tableland",
            "ecoclassCount": 17
        },
        {
            "symbol": "073X",
            "name": "Rolling Plains and Breaks",
            "ecoclassCount": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "074X",
            "name": "Central Kansas Sandstone Hills",
            "ecoclassCount": 10
        },
        {
            "symbol": "075X",
            "name": "Central Loess Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 16
        },
        {
            "symbol": "076X",
            "name": "Bluestem Hills",
            "ecoclassCount": 9
        },
        {
            "symbol": "077A",
            "name": "Southern High Plains, Northern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 10
        },
        {
            "symbol": "077B",
            "name": "Southern High Plains, Northwestern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 22
        },
        {
            "symbol": "077C",
            "name": "Southern High Plains, Southern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 12
        },
        {
            "symbol": "077D",
            "name": "Southern High Plains, Southwestern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 11
        },
        {
            "symbol": "077E",
            "name": "Southern High Plains, Breaks",
            "ecoclassCount": 15
        },
        {
            "symbol": "077X",
            "name": "Southern High Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "078A",
            "name": "Rolling Limestone Prairie",
            "ecoclassCount": 9
        },
        {
            "symbol": "078B",
            "name": "Central Rolling Red Plains, Western Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 23
        },
        {
            "symbol": "078C",
            "name": "Central Rolling Red Plains, Eastern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 26
        },
        {
            "symbol": "078D",
            "name": "Rolling Limestone Prairie (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "078X",
            "name": "Central Rolling Red Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "079X",
            "name": "Great Bend Sand Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "080A",
            "name": "Central Rolling Red Prairies",
            "ecoclassCount": 18
        },
        {
            "symbol": "080B",
            "name": "Texas North-Central Prairies",
            "ecoclassCount": 19
        },
        {
            "symbol": "081A",
            "name": "Edwards Plateau, Western Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 9
        },
        {
            "symbol": "081B",
            "name": "Edwards Plateau, Central Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 21
        },
        {
            "symbol": "081C",
            "name": "Edwards Plateau, Eastern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 12
        },
        {
            "symbol": "081D",
            "name": "Southern Edwards Plateau",
            "ecoclassCount": 3
        },
        {
            "symbol": "081X",
            "name": "Edwards Plateau",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "082A",
            "name": "Texas Central Basin",
            "ecoclassCount": 15
        },
        {
            "symbol": "082B",
            "name": "Wichita Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "082X",
            "name": "Texas Central Basin",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "083A",
            "name": "Northern Rio Grande Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 22
        },
        {
            "symbol": "083B",
            "name": "Western Rio Grande Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 17
        },
        {
            "symbol": "083C",
            "name": "Central Rio Grande Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 14
        },
        {
            "symbol": "083D",
            "name": "Lower Rio Grande Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 12
        },
        {
            "symbol": "083E",
            "name": "Sandsheet Prairie",
            "ecoclassCount": 8
        },
        {
            "symbol": "084A",
            "name": "North Cross Timbers",
            "ecoclassCount": 6
        },
        {
            "symbol": "084B",
            "name": "West Cross Timbers",
            "ecoclassCount": 9
        },
        {
            "symbol": "084C",
            "name": "East Cross Timbers",
            "ecoclassCount": 7
        },
        {
            "symbol": "085A",
            "name": "Grand Prairie (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "085B",
            "name": "Arbuckle Mountains (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "085X",
            "name": "Grand Prairie",
            "ecoclassCount": 31
        },
        {
            "symbol": "086A",
            "name": "Texas Blackland Prairie, Northern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 12
        },
        {
            "symbol": "086B",
            "name": "Texas Blackland Prairie, Southern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 6
        },
        {
            "symbol": "086X",
            "name": "Texas Blackland Prairie",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "087A",
            "name": "Texas Claypan Area, Southern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 12
        },
        {
            "symbol": "087B",
            "name": "Texas Claypan Area, Northern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 8
        },
        {
            "symbol": "087X",
            "name": "Texas Claypan Area",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "088X",
            "name": "Northern Minnesota Glacial Lake Basins",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "089X",
            "name": "Wisconsin Central Sands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "090A",
            "name": "Wisconsin and Minnesota Thin Loess and Till, Northern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "090B",
            "name": "Wisconsin and Minnesota Thin Loess and Till, Southern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "090X",
            "name": "Central Wisconsin and Minnesota Thin Loess and Till",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "091A",
            "name": "Central Minnesota Sandy Outwash",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "091B",
            "name": "Wisconsin and Minnesota Sandy Outwash",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "091X",
            "name": "Wisconsin and Minnesota Sandy Outwash",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "092X",
            "name": "Superior Lake Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "093A",
            "name": "Superior Stony and Rocky Loamy Plains and Hills, Western Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 3
        },
        {
            "symbol": "093B",
            "name": "Superior Stony and Rocky Loamy Plains and Hills, Eastern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "093X",
            "name": "Superior Stony and Rocky Loamy Plains and Hills",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "094A",
            "name": "Northern Michigan and Wisconsin Sandy Drift",
            "ecoclassCount": 26
        },
        {
            "symbol": "094B",
            "name": "Michigan Eastern Upper Peninsula Sandy Drift",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "094C",
            "name": "Michigan Northern Lower Peninsula Sandy Drift",
            "ecoclassCount": 12
        },
        {
            "symbol": "094D",
            "name": "Northern Highland Sandy Drift",
            "ecoclassCount": 19
        },
        {
            "symbol": "095A",
            "name": "Northeastern Wisconsin Drift Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "095B",
            "name": "Southern Wisconsin and Northern Illinois Drift Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "096X",
            "name": "Western Michigan Fruit Belt",
            "ecoclassCount": 28
        },
        {
            "symbol": "097X",
            "name": "Southwestern Michigan Fruit and Truck Belt",
            "ecoclassCount": 30
        },
        {
            "symbol": "098X",
            "name": "Southern Michigan and Northern Indiana Drift Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 28
        },
        {
            "symbol": "099X",
            "name": "Erie-Huron Lake Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 15
        },
        {
            "symbol": "100X",
            "name": "Erie Fruit and Truck Area",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "101X",
            "name": "Ontario-Erie Plain and Finger Lakes Region",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "102A",
            "name": "Rolling Till Prairie",
            "ecoclassCount": 18
        },
        {
            "symbol": "102B",
            "name": "Till Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 17
        },
        {
            "symbol": "102C",
            "name": "Loess Uplands",
            "ecoclassCount": 6
        },
        {
            "symbol": "103X",
            "name": "Central Iowa and Minnesota Till Prairies",
            "ecoclassCount": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "104X",
            "name": "Eastern Iowa and Minnesota Till Prairies",
            "ecoclassCount": 21
        },
        {
            "symbol": "105X",
            "name": "Northern Mississippi Valley Loess Hills",
            "ecoclassCount": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "106X",
            "name": "Nebraska and Kansas Loess-Drift Hills",
            "ecoclassCount": 14
        },
        {
            "symbol": "107A",
            "name": "Iowa and Minnesota Loess Hills",
            "ecoclassCount": 15
        },
        {
            "symbol": "107B",
            "name": "Iowa and Missouri Deep Loess Hills",
            "ecoclassCount": 26
        },
        {
            "symbol": "107X",
            "name": "Iowa and Missouri Deep Loess Hills",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "108A",
            "name": "Illinois and Iowa Deep Loess and Drift, Eastern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 20
        },
        {
            "symbol": "108B",
            "name": "Illinois and Iowa Deep Loess and Drift, East Central Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 21
        },
        {
            "symbol": "108C",
            "name": "Illinois and Iowa Deep Loess and Drift, West Central Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 30
        },
        {
            "symbol": "108D",
            "name": "Illinois and Iowa Deep Loess and Drift, Western Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 24
        },
        {
            "symbol": "108X",
            "name": "Illinois and Iowa Deep Loess and Drift",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "109X",
            "name": "Iowa and Missouri Heavy Till Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 29
        },
        {
            "symbol": "110X",
            "name": "Northern Illinois and Indiana Heavy Till Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "111A",
            "name": "Indiana and Ohio Till Plain, Central Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "111B",
            "name": "Indiana and Ohio Till Plain, Northeastern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "111C",
            "name": "Indiana and Ohio Till Plain, Northwestern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 14
        },
        {
            "symbol": "111D",
            "name": "Indiana and Ohio Till Plain, Western Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "111E",
            "name": "Indiana and Ohio Till Plain, Eastern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "111X",
            "name": "Indiana and Ohio Till Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "112X",
            "name": "Cherokee Prairies",
            "ecoclassCount": 10
        },
        {
            "symbol": "113X",
            "name": "Central Claypan Areas",
            "ecoclassCount": 5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "114A",
            "name": "Southern Illinois and Indiana Thin Loess and Till Plain, Eastern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "114B",
            "name": "Southern Illinois and Indiana Thin Loess and Till Plain, Western Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "114X",
            "name": "Southern Illinois and Indiana Thin Loess and Till Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "115A",
            "name": "Central Mississippi Valley Wooded Slopes, Eastern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "115B",
            "name": "Central Mississippi Valley Wooded Slopes, Western Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 37
        },
        {
            "symbol": "115C",
            "name": "Central Mississippi Valley Wooded Slopes, Northern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "115X",
            "name": "Central Mississippi Valley Wooded Slopes",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "116A",
            "name": "Ozark Highland",
            "ecoclassCount": 48
        },
        {
            "symbol": "116B",
            "name": "Springfield Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 32
        },
        {
            "symbol": "116C",
            "name": "St. Francois Knobs and Basins",
            "ecoclassCount": 8
        },
        {
            "symbol": "117X",
            "name": "Boston Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 3
        },
        {
            "symbol": "118A",
            "name": "Arkansas Valley and Ridges, Eastern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 11
        },
        {
            "symbol": "118B",
            "name": "Arkansas Valley and Ridges, Western Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 6
        },
        {
            "symbol": "118X",
            "name": "Arkansas Valley and Ridges",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "119X",
            "name": "Ouachita Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 34
        },
        {
            "symbol": "120A",
            "name": "Kentucky and Indiana Sandstone and Shale Hills and Valleys, Southern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 17
        },
        {
            "symbol": "120B",
            "name": "Kentucky and Indiana Sandstone and Shale Hills and Valleys, Northwestern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 15
        },
        {
            "symbol": "120C",
            "name": "Kentucky and Indiana Sandstone and Shale Hills and Valleys, Northeastern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 9
        },
        {
            "symbol": "120X",
            "name": "Kentucky and Indiana Sandstone and Shale Hills and Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "121X",
            "name": "Kentucky Bluegrass",
            "ecoclassCount": 19
        },
        {
            "symbol": "122X",
            "name": "Highland Rim and Pennyroyal",
            "ecoclassCount": 31
        },
        {
            "symbol": "123X",
            "name": "Nashville Basin",
            "ecoclassCount": 4
        },
        {
            "symbol": "124X",
            "name": "Western Allegheny Plateau",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "125X",
            "name": "Cumberland Plateau and Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "126X",
            "name": "Central Allegheny Plateau",
            "ecoclassCount": 8
        },
        {
            "symbol": "127X",
            "name": "Eastern Allegheny Plateau and Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 14
        },
        {
            "symbol": "128X",
            "name": "Southern Appalachian Ridges and Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 26
        },
        {
            "symbol": "129X",
            "name": "Sand Mountain",
            "ecoclassCount": 7
        },
        {
            "symbol": "130A",
            "name": "Northern Blue Ridge",
            "ecoclassCount": 9
        },
        {
            "symbol": "130B",
            "name": "Southern Blue Ridge",
            "ecoclassCount": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "130X",
            "name": "Blue Ridge",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "131A",
            "name": "Southern Mississippi River Alluvium",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "131B",
            "name": "Arkansas River Alluvium",
            "ecoclassCount": 6
        },
        {
            "symbol": "131C",
            "name": "Red River Alluvium",
            "ecoclassCount": 5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "131D",
            "name": "Southern Mississippi River Terraces",
            "ecoclassCount": 6
        },
        {
            "symbol": "131X",
            "name": "Southern Mississippi Valley Alluvium",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "133A",
            "name": "Southern Coastal Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 10
        },
        {
            "symbol": "133B",
            "name": "Western Coastal Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 12
        },
        {
            "symbol": "134X",
            "name": "Southern Mississippi Valley Loess",
            "ecoclassCount": 63
        },
        {
            "symbol": "135A",
            "name": "Alabama and Mississippi Blackland Prairie",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "135B",
            "name": "Cretaceous Western Coastal Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "135X",
            "name": "Alabama, Mississippi, and Arkansas Blackland Prairie",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "136X",
            "name": "Southern Piedmont",
            "ecoclassCount": 35
        },
        {
            "symbol": "137X",
            "name": "Carolina and Georgia Sand Hills",
            "ecoclassCount": 6
        },
        {
            "symbol": "138X",
            "name": "North-Central Florida Ridge",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "139X",
            "name": "Lake Erie Glaciated Plateau",
            "ecoclassCount": 14
        },
        {
            "symbol": "140X",
            "name": "Glaciated Allegheny Plateau and Catskill Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "141X",
            "name": "Tughill Plateau",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "142X",
            "name": "St. Lawrence-Champlain Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "143X",
            "name": "Northeastern Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 25
        },
        {
            "symbol": "144A",
            "name": "New England and Eastern New York Upland, Southern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 42
        },
        {
            "symbol": "144B",
            "name": "New England and Eastern New York Upland, Northern Part",
            "ecoclassCount": 3
        },
        {
            "symbol": "145X",
            "name": "Connecticut Valley",
            "ecoclassCount": 14
        },
        {
            "symbol": "146X",
            "name": "Aroostook Area",
            "ecoclassCount": 12
        },
        {
            "symbol": "147X",
            "name": "Northern Appalachian Ridges and Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 15
        },
        {
            "symbol": "148X",
            "name": "Northern Piedmont",
            "ecoclassCount": 14
        },
        {
            "symbol": "149A",
            "name": "Northern Coastal Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "149B",
            "name": "Long Island-Cape Cod Coastal Lowland",
            "ecoclassCount": 12
        },
        {
            "symbol": "150A",
            "name": "Gulf Coast Prairies",
            "ecoclassCount": 18
        },
        {
            "symbol": "150B",
            "name": "Gulf Coast Saline Prairies",
            "ecoclassCount": 16
        },
        {
            "symbol": "151X",
            "name": "Gulf Coast Marsh",
            "ecoclassCount": 11
        },
        {
            "symbol": "152A",
            "name": "Eastern Gulf Coast Flatwoods",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "152B",
            "name": "Western Gulf Coast Flatwoods",
            "ecoclassCount": 14
        },
        {
            "symbol": "153A",
            "name": "Atlantic Coast Flatwoods",
            "ecoclassCount": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "153B",
            "name": "Tidewater Area",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "153C",
            "name": "Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "153D",
            "name": "Northern Tidewater Area",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "154X",
            "name": "South-Central Florida Ridge",
            "ecoclassCount": 17
        },
        {
            "symbol": "155X",
            "name": "Southern Florida Flatwoods",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "156A",
            "name": "Florida Everglades and Associated Areas",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "156B",
            "name": "Southern Florida Lowlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "157X",
            "name": "Arid and Semiarid Low Mountain Slopes",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "158X",
            "name": "Semiarid and Subhumid Low Mountain Slopes",
            "ecoclassCount": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "159A",
            "name": "Humid and Very Humid Volcanic Ash Soils on Low and Intermediate Rolling Mountain Slopes",
            "ecoclassCount": 3
        },
        {
            "symbol": "159B",
            "name": "Subhumid and Humid Low and Intermediate Mountain Slopes",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "159X",
            "name": "Humid and Very Humid Low and Intermediate Mountain Slopes",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "160X",
            "name": "Subhumid and Humid Intermediate and High Mountain Slopes",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "161A",
            "name": "Lava Flows and Rock Outcrops",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "161B",
            "name": "Semiarid and Subhumid Organic Soils on Lava Flows",
            "ecoclassCount": 3
        },
        {
            "symbol": "161X",
            "name": "Lava Flows and Rock Outcrops",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "162X",
            "name": "Humid and Very Humid Organic Soils on Lava Flows",
            "ecoclassCount": 5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "163X",
            "name": "Alluvial Fans and Coastal Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "164X",
            "name": "Humid and Very Humid Steep and Very Steep Mountain Slopes",
            "ecoclassCount": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "165X",
            "name": "Subhumid Intermediate Mountain Slopes",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "166X",
            "name": "Very Stony Land and Rock Land",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "167X",
            "name": "Humid Oxidic Soils on Low and Intermediate Rolling Mountain Slopes",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "168X",
            "name": "Southeastern Alaska",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "169X",
            "name": "South-Central Alaska Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "170X",
            "name": "Cook Inlet-Susitna Lowland",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "171X",
            "name": "Alaska Peninsula and Southwestern Islands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "172X",
            "name": "Copper River Plateau",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "173X",
            "name": "Alaska Range",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "174X",
            "name": "Interior Alaska Lowlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "175X",
            "name": "Kuskokwim Highlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "176X",
            "name": "Interior Alaska Highlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "177X",
            "name": "Norton Sound Highlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "178X",
            "name": "Western Alaska Coastal Plains and Deltas",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "179X",
            "name": "Bering Sea Islands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "180X",
            "name": "Brooks Range",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "181X",
            "name": "Arctic Foothills",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "182X",
            "name": "Arctic Coastal Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "190X",
            "name": "Stratovolcanoes of the Mariana Islands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "191X",
            "name": "High Limestone Plateaus of the Mariana Islands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "192X",
            "name": "Volcanic Highlands of the Mariana Islands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "193X",
            "name": "Volcanic Islands of Western Micronesia",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "194X",
            "name": "Low Limestone Islands of Western Micronesia",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "195X",
            "name": "Volcanic Islands of Central and Eastern Micronesia",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "196X",
            "name": "Coral Atolls of Micronesia",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "197X",
            "name": "Volcanic Islands of American Samoa",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "198X",
            "name": "Ofu, Olosega (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "199X",
            "name": "Northern Guam (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "200X",
            "name": "Southern Guam (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "201X",
            "name": "Saipan (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "202X",
            "name": "Aguijan, Tinian (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "203X",
            "name": "Rota (proposed)",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "220X",
            "name": "Alexander Archipelago-Gulf of Alaska Coast",
            "ecoclassCount": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "221X",
            "name": "Kodiak Archipelago",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "222X",
            "name": "Southern Alaska Coastal Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 10
        },
        {
            "symbol": "223X",
            "name": "Cook Inlet Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 14
        },
        {
            "symbol": "224X",
            "name": "Cook Inlet Lowlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 14
        },
        {
            "symbol": "225X",
            "name": "Southern Alaska Peninsula Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "226X",
            "name": "Aleutian Islands-Western Alaska Peninsula",
            "ecoclassCount": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "227X",
            "name": "Copper River Basin",
            "ecoclassCount": 21
        },
        {
            "symbol": "228X",
            "name": "Interior Alaska Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 41
        },
        {
            "symbol": "229X",
            "name": "Interior Alaska Lowlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 24
        },
        {
            "symbol": "230X",
            "name": "Yukon-Kuskokwim Highlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 7
        },
        {
            "symbol": "231X",
            "name": "Interior Alaska Highlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "232X",
            "name": "Yukon Flats Lowlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "233X",
            "name": "Upper Kobuk and Koyukuk Hills and Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "234X",
            "name": "Interior Brooks Range Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "235X",
            "name": "Northern Alaska Peninsula Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "236X",
            "name": "Bristol Bay-Northern Alaska Peninsula Lowlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 26
        },
        {
            "symbol": "237X",
            "name": "Ahklun Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "238X",
            "name": "Yukon-Kuskokwim Coastal Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "239X",
            "name": "Northern Bering Sea Islands",
            "ecoclassCount": 30
        },
        {
            "symbol": "240X",
            "name": "Nulato Hills-Southern Seward Peninsula Highlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "241X",
            "name": "Seward Peninsula Highlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "242X",
            "name": "Northern Seward Peninsula-Selawik Lowlands",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "243X",
            "name": "Western Brooks Range Mountains, Foothills, and Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "244X",
            "name": "Northern Brooks Range Mountains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "245X",
            "name": "Arctic Foothills",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "246X",
            "name": "Arctic Coastal Plain",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "270X",
            "name": "Humid Mountains and Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "271X",
            "name": "Semiarid Mountains and Valleys",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "272X",
            "name": "Humid Coastal Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        },
        {
            "symbol": "273X",
            "name": "Semiarid Coastal Plains",
            "ecoclassCount": 0
        }
    ]
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Interpretation description

This service returns a JSON file of interpretation data for the specified ecological class. Data for all description sections can be obtained using the Class Description web service.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/descriptions/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/interpretations.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
interpretations Interpretation description data
interpretations.narratives Interpretation narratives
interpretations.narratives.animalCommunity Animal community narrative
interpretations.narratives.hydrologicalFunctions Hydrological functions narrative
interpretations.narratives.recreationalUse Recreational use narrative
interpretations.narratives.woodProducts Wood products narrative
interpretations.narratives.otherProducts Other products narrative
interpretations.narratives.otherInformation Other information narrative
interpretations.siteProductivity Site productivity table data
interpretations.siteProductivity.symbol Plant symbol
interpretations.siteProductivity.commonName Plant common name
interpretations.siteProductivity.scientificName Plant scientific name
interpretations.siteProductivity.indexMin Index minimum
interpretations.siteProductivity.indexMax Index maximum
interpretations.siteProductivity.cmaiMin CMAI minimum
interpretations.siteProductivity.cmaiMax CMAI maximum
interpretations.siteProductivity.cmaiAge CMAI age
interpretations.siteProductivity.siteCurve Site productivity curve code
interpretations.siteProductivity.basis Site productivity basis
interpretations.siteProductivity.citation Site productivity citation
interpretations.otherProductivity Other plant productivity table data
interpretations.otherProductivity.symbol Plant symbol
interpretations.otherProductivity.commonName Plant common name
interpretations.otherProductivity.scientificName Plant scientific name
interpretations.otherProductivity.narrative Other plant productivity narrative
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/interpretations.json
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "interpretations": {
        "narratives": {
            "animalCommunity": "The oak-hickory forests that represent the reference state provide important mast production for a variety of wildlife species. Acorns in particular are an extremely important food source for birds and mammals during the dormant season (McShea et al., 2006). Ninety-six species of birds and mammals are known to consume acorns, especially in fall and winter (Martin, 1961). Acorns produced from white oak tree species (white oak, chestnut oak, etc.) are typically more palatable than acorns from the red oak group, although red oak acorns are still an important food source, particularly in the winter season when acorns from white oak species have already been consumed.  Examples of animals that consume acorns within this ecological site include insects such as the acorn weevil, birds (e.g. wild turkeys, northern bobwhite quail, woodpeckers, blue jays, crows), small mammals (e.g., chipmunks, fox squirrels, flying squirrels, rabbits, mice, voles, raccoons and opossums), and large mammals (e.g., white-tailed deer, red and gray foxes, black bear), (Dickson, 2004).  Prior to its extinction, the passenger pigeon would have been an important consumer and distributor of acorns as well (Frelich and Reich, 2002).  \r\n \r\nOak is considered a foundation species for wildlife in the eastern forest (McShea et al., 2006).  However, oak species have considerable variability in acorn production (crop size from year to year), which can substantially affect the availability of mast for wildlife.  Providing variety in hard and soft mast producing species can help to ensure that food is available from season to season and from year to year.  Hickory nuts can also be important mast for wildlife.  In fact, hickory makes up 10 to 20 percent of squirrel diets in similar systems (Apsley and Gehrt, 2006).  \r\n \r\nFrom a habitat perspective, oak-hickory forests are extremely important.  For example, numerous birds depend on different stages of these forest systems to survive. The Appalachian region, the location of this ecological site, is the center of the summer breeding range of neotropical migratory birds. Neotropical migrants include forest-interior, forest-edge, and early-successional species and comprise 65 to 85 percent of breeding birds (Smith, 1995).  The Indiana bat is the primary threatened and endangered bat species.  Shaggy bark (e.g., shagbark hickory) and scaly bark (white oak) species provide excellent roosting sites for this species.  The Northern long eared bat is not listed yet, but is expected to be and would also use associated trees as roosting sites.\r\n \r\nYoung (1 to 10 year post-disturbance) upland oak forests function as high-quality food patches for myriad wildlife species. Fruit producing early successional plants such as pokeweed and blackberry, young shrubs, and tree sprouts play an important role in the diets of several bird species, arthropods, and small mammals that serve as prey for numerous snake, bird, and mammal predators (Greenberg, et al. 2011).  Mature stands serve as habitat for wild turkey in fall and winter where they utilize acorns as an important part of their diet.  Additionally, most forest-dwelling amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals required at least a sawtimber stage of maturity in similar forest systems in New England (Healy, 2002).  \r\n \r\nSnags, cavity trees, and downed logs provide habitat for a wide variety of wildlife species; as such, they are important components of oak-hickory forests on this ecological site. Snags are standing dead or dying trees, and downed logs are simply logs that are on or near the forest floor. Cavity trees are live trees with holes big enough to shelter animals. This includes trees with cavities in the limbs, which can actually be more important to some wildlife species than larger hollow trees. Snags are created by lightning, storm breakage, fire, disease, insects, drought, flooding, cultural practices, among other factors that contribute to tree mortality.\r\n \r\n \r\nWildlife species are affected by ecological dynamics in upland oak forests to varying degrees. Management must consider all factors that could impact wildlife populations and be site-based in application. A balance of successional stages in sustainable proportions across the landscape (multiple forest age classes) with consideration for snags and cavity trees will sustain high quality food patches and habitat for wildlife overall.",
            "hydrologicalFunctions": "Soils in forests have well developed structure, which is maintained by many factors of the forest environment.  The surface of the soil is protected from raindrop impact by the forest canopy and the surface organic layers (Carmean, 1957), infiltration is generally good and runoff is low.  \r\n\r\nLong-term research on mixed hardwood forests in this region indicates that there is little long-term effect of clearcutting and other logging practices on hydrologic and water quality sustainability, especially at smaller scales (Swank et al., 2001). Harvesting increases annual water yield typically only during the first 4 to 5 years after cutting.  However, harvesting practices vary and have an impact on the severity of impact to hydrologic function.  For example, clear-cut size, logging techniques, and the density and condition of logging roads can all create more surface soil disturbance which results in more runoff.  Following best management practices (BMPs) is a good way to avoid the negative impacts of logging to soil and water resources both in the short and long term.  \r\n\r\nUnlike the short-term effect of most forestry practices, conversion of forest land to pasture or lawn (urban use) can result in higher bulk densities and lower infiltration rates and water holding capacities in soils, which can be attributed to higher compaction associated with land management practices (Price et al., 2010).  This leads to increased runoff and can negatively influence water quality.  Good pasture management can reduce negative effects to some extent and should always be employed to protect soil and water quality wherever possible.  ",
            "recreationalUses": "Most of the Thermic Cherty Dolomite Uplands is under private ownership so public recreation opportunities are limited.  However, some of the western part of the Conasauga Ranger District (Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest) falls within this ecological site.  The opportunities there include bicycling, camping and cabins, hiking, horse riding, nature viewing, off-highway vehicle riding, picnicking, and scenic driving.  \r\n\r\nSimilar opportunities can be found on smaller parcels of land owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority.  Several of their Small Wild Areas (SWAs) on this ecological site have hiking trails and scenic overlooks. The University of Tennessee Forest Resources AgResearch and Education Center almost entirely falls within this ecological site.  There are numerous hiking trails, an Arboretum and outdoor classroom and educational nature trails available to the public, among other opportunities. ",
            "woodProducts": "This ecological site is dominated by forests in varying stages of succession.  Most forestland is held by small, private landowners.  Only a small extent of this ecological site occurs on public land.  Important wood products include hardwood sawlogs (red oak, white oak, ash, tuliptree, walnut, cherry, sugar maple, and hickory), crosstie logs, hickory handle logs, white oak stave logs, hardwood pulpwood, softwood logs and veneer logs (Tennessee Forest Products Bulletin, 2013).  ",
            "otherProducts": "",
            "otherInformation": ""
        },
        "siteProductivity": [
            {
                "symbol": "QUAL",
                "commonName": "white oak",
                "scientificName": "Quercus alba",
                "indexMin": 65,
                "indexMax": 75,
                "cmaiMin": 0,
                "cmaiMax": 0,
                "cmaiAge": "",
                "siteCurve": 810,
                "basis": "",
                "citation": ""
            },
            {
                "symbol": "LITU",
                "commonName": "tuliptree",
                "scientificName": "Liriodendron tulipifera",
                "indexMin": 70,
                "indexMax": 85,
                "cmaiMin": 0,
                "cmaiMax": 0,
                "cmaiAge": "",
                "siteCurve": 355,
                "basis": "",
                "citation": ""
            }
        ],
        "otherProductivity": []
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Physiographic features description

This service returns a JSON file of physiographic features data for the specified ecological class. Data for all description sections can be obtained using the Class Description web service.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/descriptions/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/physiographic-features.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
measurementSystem query optional Measurement system ("usc" or "metric"). Default is "usc".
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
physiographicFeatures Physiographic features description data
physiographicFeatures.narratives Physiographic features narratives
physiographicFeatures.narratives.physiographicFeatures Physiographic features narrative
physiographicFeatures.images Physiographic features images
physiographicFeatures.images.path Image path
physiographicFeatures.images.orientation Image orientation
physiographicFeatures.images.caption Image caption
physiographicFeatures.landforms Landforms
physiographicFeatures.landforms.landscape Landscape name
physiographicFeatures.landforms.landform Landform name
physiographicFeatures.landforms.microfeature Microfeature name
physiographicFeatures.landforms.landscapeDescription Landscape description
physiographicFeatures.landforms.landformDescription Landform description
physiographicFeatures.landforms.microfeatureDescription Microfeature description
physiographicFeatures.aspect Aspect classes
physiographicFeatures.nominalProperties Nominal physiographic property
physiographicFeatures.nominalProperties.property Nominal physiographic property name
physiographicFeatures.nominalProperties.value Nominal physiographic property value
physiographicFeatures.nominalProperties.description Description of the nominal physiographic property value
physiographicFeatures.ordinalProperties Ordinal physiographic properties
physiographicFeatures.ordinalProperties.property Ordinal physiographic property name
physiographicFeatures.ordinalProperties.representativeLow Ordinal physiographic property representative low value
physiographicFeatures.ordinalProperties.representativeHigh Ordinal physiographic property representative high value
physiographicFeatures.ordinalProperties.rangeLow Ordinal physiographic property range low value
physiographicFeatures.ordinalProperties.rangeHigh Ordinal physiographic property range high value
physiographicFeatures.ordinalProperties.representativeLowDesc Ordinal physiographic property representative low value description
physiographicFeatures.ordinalProperties.representativeHighDesc Ordinal physiographic property representative high value description
physiographicFeatures.ordinalProperties.rangeLowDesc Ordinal physiographic property range low value description
physiographicFeatures.ordinalProperties.rangeHighDesc Ordinal physiographic property range high value description
physiographicFeatures.intervalProperties Interval physiographic properties
physiographicFeatures.intervalProperties.property Interval physiographic property name
physiographicFeatures.intervalProperties.unit Interval physiographic property measurement unit
physiographicFeatures.intervalProperties.representativeHigh Interval physiographic property representative high value
physiographicFeatures.intervalProperties.representativeLow Interval physiographic property low value
physiographicFeatures.intervalProperties.rangeHigh Interval physiographic property range high value
physiographicFeatures.intervalProperties.rangeLow Interval physiographic property range low value
physiographicFeatures.propertyRangeCount Number of non-empty range entries for ordinal and interval physiographic properties combined
physiographicFeatures.propertyRVCount Number of non-empty representative value entries for ordinal and interval physiographic properties combined
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/physiographic-features.json
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/physiographic-features.json?measurementSystem=metric
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "physiographicFeatures": {
        "narratives": {
            "physiographicFeatures": "This ecological site occurs on summits, shoulders, and backslopes on dissected uplands weathered from cherty dolomitic limestone.  Slopes are 2 to 60 percent.  Elevation ranges from 500 to 2,130 feet.  The topography ranges from ridges to rolling hills.\r\n\r\nThis site can generate runoff to adjacent, downslope ecological sites.  This site does not flood.  \r\n"
        },
        "images": [
            {
                "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/es/13781.jpg",
                "orientation": "landscape",
                "caption": "Example Block Diagram for Cherty Dolomite Upland"
            }
        ],
        "landforms": [
            {
                "landscape": "",
                "landform": "Ridge",
                "microfeature": "",
                "landscapeDesc": "",
                "landformDesc": "A long, narrow elevation of the land surface, usually sharp crested with steep sides and forming an extended upland between valleys.  The term is used in areas of both hill and mountain relief.  HP",
                "microfeatureDesc": "",
                "modifiers": ""
            },
            {
                "landscape": "",
                "landform": "Hill",
                "microfeature": "",
                "landscapeDesc": "",
                "landformDesc": "A generic term for an elevated area of the land surface, rising at least 30 m (100 ft.) to as much as 300 meters (approx. 1000 ft.) above surrounding lowlands, usually with a nominal summit area relative to bounding slopes, a well-defined, rounded outline and slopes that generally exceed 15 percent.  A hill can occur as a single, isolated mass or in a group.  A hill can be further specified based on the magnitude of local relief: low hill (30 - 90 m) or high hill (90 - 300 m).  Informal distinctions between a hill and a mountain are often arbitrary and dependent on local convention. Compare - hillock, plateau, mountain, foothills, hills.  SW &  HP",
                "microfeatureDesc": "",
                "modifiers": ""
            }
        ],
        "aspect": [
            "SE",
            "SW",
            "NW"
        ],
        "nominalProperties": [],
        "ordinalProperties": [
            {
                "property": "Flooding frequency",
                "representativeLow": "None",
                "representativeHigh": "None",
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": "",
                "representativeLowDesc": "No reasonable possibility of flooding; near 0 percent chance of flooding in any year or less than 1 time in 500 years.",
                "representativeHighDesc": "No reasonable possibility of flooding; near 0 percent chance of flooding in any year or less than 1 time in 500 years.",
                "rangeLowDesc": "",
                "rangeHighDesc": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Ponding frequency",
                "representativeLow": "None",
                "representativeHigh": "None",
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": "",
                "representativeLowDesc": "No reasonable possibility of ponding, near 0 percent chance on ponding in any year.",
                "representativeHighDesc": "No reasonable possibility of ponding, near 0 percent chance on ponding in any year.",
                "rangeLowDesc": "",
                "rangeHighDesc": ""
            }
        ],
        "intervalProperties": [
            {
                "property": "Elevation",
                "unit": "ft",
                "representativeLow": 500,
                "representativeHigh": 2130,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Slope",
                "unit": "%",
                "representativeLow": 2,
                "representativeHigh": 60,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Water table depth",
                "unit": "in",
                "representativeLow": 60,
                "representativeHigh": 60,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            }
        ],
        "propertyRVCount": 5,
        "propertyRangeCount": 0
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Plant community annual production

This service returns a JSON file of annual production data for the specified state and transition model plant community.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/plant-community-tables/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/{landUse}/{state}/{community}/annual-production.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
landUse path required Land use sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include land uses)
state path required Ecosystem state sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include ecosystem states)
community path required Plant community sequence
measurementSystem query optional Measurement system ("usc" or "metric"). Default is "usc".
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
annualProduction Plant community annual production data
annualProduction.plantTypeCode Plant type code
annualProduction.plantType Plant type label
annualProduction.low Low value (usc units: lb/acre, metric units: kg/hectare)
annualProduction.rv Representative value (usc units: lb/acre, metric units: kg/hectare)
annualProduction.high High value (usc units: lb/acre, metric units: kg/hectare)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/annual-production.json
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/annual-production.json?measurementSystem=metric
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "annualProduction": []
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Plant community canopy structure

This service returns a JSON file of canopy structure data for the specified state and transition model plant community.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/plant-community-tables/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/{landUse}/{state}/{community}/canopy-structure.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
landUse path required Land use sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include land uses)
state path required Ecosystem state sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include ecosystem states)
community path required Plant community sequence
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
canopyStructure Plant community canopy structure data
canopyStructure.{material} Material type (1=Tree; 2=Shrub/vine; 3=Grass/grasslike; 4=Forb)
canopyStructure.{material}.{heightClass} Height class in feet (1=<0.5; 2=>0.5<=1; 3=>1<=2; 4=>2<=4.5; 5=>4.5<= 13; 6=>13<=40; 7=>40<=80; 8=>80<=120; 9=>120)
canopyStructure.{material}.{heightClass}.low Cover low value (%)
canopyStructure.{material}.{heightClass}.high Cover high value (%)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/canopy-structure.json
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "canopyStructure": {
        "1": {
            "1": {
                "low": 0,
                "high": 1
            },
            "2": {
                "low": 0,
                "high": 2
            },
            "3": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "4": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "5": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "6": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "7": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "8": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "9": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            }
        },
        "2": {
            "1": {
                "low": 0,
                "high": 5
            },
            "2": {
                "low": 1,
                "high": 5
            },
            "3": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "4": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "5": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "6": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "7": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "8": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "9": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            }
        },
        "3": {
            "1": {
                "low": 11,
                "high": 20
            },
            "2": {
                "low": 1,
                "high": 20
            },
            "3": {
                "low": 0,
                "high": 5
            },
            "4": {
                "low": 1,
                "high": 5
            },
            "5": {
                "low": 1,
                "high": 5
            },
            "6": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "7": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "8": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "9": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            }
        },
        "4": {
            "1": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "2": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "3": {
                "low": "",
                "high": ""
            },
            "4": {
                "low": 1,
                "high": 5
            },
            "5": {
                "low": 1,
                "high": 5
            },
            "6": {
                "low": 2,
                "high": 25
            },
            "7": {
                "low": 2,
                "high": 45
            },
            "8": {
                "low": 30,
                "high": 75
            },
            "9": {
                "low": 20,
                "high": 30
            }
        }
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Plant community forest overstory composition

This service returns a JSON file of forest overstory species data for the specified state and transition model plant community.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/plant-community-tables/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/{landUse}/{state}/{community}/forest-overstory.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
landUse path required Land use sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include land uses)
state path required Ecosystem state sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include ecosystem states)
community path required Plant community sequence
measurementSystem query optional Measurement system ("usc" or "metric"). Default is "usc".
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
forestOverstory Plant community forest overstory species data
forestOverstory.symbol Plant species symbol
forestOverstory.commonName Plant species common name
forestOverstory.scientificName Plant species scientific name
forestOverstory.plantType Plant type label
forestOverstory.nativity Plant nativity
forestOverstory.coverLow Cover low value (%)
forestOverstory.coverHigh Cover high value (%)
forestOverstory.canopyBottom Canopy bottom height (usc units: ft, metric units: m)
forestOverstory.canopyTop Canopy top height (usc units: ft, metric units: m)
forestOverstory.diameterLow Tree diameter low value (usc units: in, metric units: cm)
forestOverstory.diameterHigh Tree diameter high value (usc units: in, metric units: cm)
forestOverstory.basalAreaLow Tree basal area low value (usc units: square ft/acre, metric units: square m/hect)
forestOverstory.basalAreaHigh Tree basal area high value (usc units: square ft/acre, metric units: square m/hect)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/forest-overstory.json
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/forest-overstory.json?measurementSystem=metric
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "forestOverstory": [
        {
            "symbol": "CAGL8",
            "commonName": "pignut hickory",
            "scientificName": "Carya glabra",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 5,
            "coverHigh": 50,
            "canopyBottom": 30,
            "canopyTop": 65,
            "diameterLow": 4.2,
            "diameterHigh": 20,
            "basalAreaLow": 10,
            "basalAreaHigh": 20
        },
        {
            "symbol": "QUAL",
            "commonName": "white oak",
            "scientificName": "Quercus alba",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 50,
            "canopyBottom": 50,
            "canopyTop": 100,
            "diameterLow": 7,
            "diameterHigh": 32.1,
            "basalAreaLow": 10,
            "basalAreaHigh": 60
        },
        {
            "symbol": "LITU",
            "commonName": "tuliptree",
            "scientificName": "Liriodendron tulipifera",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 40,
            "canopyBottom": 50,
            "canopyTop": 85,
            "diameterLow": 9.6,
            "diameterHigh": 22.5,
            "basalAreaLow": 10,
            "basalAreaHigh": 30
        },
        {
            "symbol": "QURU",
            "commonName": "northern red oak",
            "scientificName": "Quercus rubra",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 5,
            "coverHigh": 25,
            "canopyBottom": 50,
            "canopyTop": 100,
            "diameterLow": 21,
            "diameterHigh": 27,
            "basalAreaLow": 20,
            "basalAreaHigh": 40
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ACSA3",
            "commonName": "sugar maple",
            "scientificName": "Acer saccharum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 10,
            "coverHigh": 25,
            "canopyBottom": 20,
            "canopyTop": 60,
            "diameterLow": 3.4,
            "diameterHigh": 25,
            "basalAreaLow": 10,
            "basalAreaHigh": 30
        },
        {
            "symbol": "QUVE",
            "commonName": "black oak",
            "scientificName": "Quercus velutina",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 20,
            "canopyBottom": 50,
            "canopyTop": 105,
            "diameterLow": 9.8,
            "diameterHigh": 25,
            "basalAreaLow": 10,
            "basalAreaHigh": 30
        },
        {
            "symbol": "FAGR",
            "commonName": "American beech",
            "scientificName": "Fagus grandifolia",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 6,
            "coverHigh": 20,
            "canopyBottom": 40,
            "canopyTop": 80,
            "diameterLow": 6.5,
            "diameterHigh": 23.4,
            "basalAreaLow": 10,
            "basalAreaHigh": 30
        },
        {
            "symbol": "OXAR",
            "commonName": "sourwood",
            "scientificName": "Oxydendrum arboreum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 5,
            "coverHigh": 20,
            "canopyBottom": 20,
            "canopyTop": 40,
            "diameterLow": 4.3,
            "diameterHigh": 9.5,
            "basalAreaLow": "",
            "basalAreaHigh": ""
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ACRU",
            "commonName": "red maple",
            "scientificName": "Acer rubrum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 10,
            "canopyBottom": 20,
            "canopyTop": 50,
            "diameterLow": 2,
            "diameterHigh": 25,
            "basalAreaLow": "",
            "basalAreaHigh": 20
        },
        {
            "symbol": "NYSY",
            "commonName": "blackgum",
            "scientificName": "Nyssa sylvatica",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 5,
            "canopyBottom": 20,
            "canopyTop": 45,
            "diameterLow": 2.6,
            "diameterHigh": 13.2,
            "basalAreaLow": "",
            "basalAreaHigh": 10
        },
        {
            "symbol": "SAAL5",
            "commonName": "sassafras",
            "scientificName": "Sassafras albidum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 2,
            "canopyBottom": 5,
            "canopyTop": 20,
            "diameterLow": 3.8,
            "diameterHigh": 4.2,
            "basalAreaLow": "",
            "basalAreaHigh": ""
        },
        {
            "symbol": "JUVI",
            "commonName": "eastern redcedar",
            "scientificName": "Juniperus virginiana",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 5,
            "canopyTop": 20,
            "diameterLow": 0,
            "diameterHigh": 2.9,
            "basalAreaLow": "",
            "basalAreaHigh": ""
        }
    ]
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Plant community forest understory composition

This service returns a JSON file of forest understory species data for the specified state and transition model plant community.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/plant-community-tables/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/{landUse}/{state}/{community}/forest-understory.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
landUse path required Land use sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include land uses)
state path required Ecosystem state sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include ecosystem states)
community path required Plant community sequence
measurementSystem query optional Measurement system ("usc" or "metric"). Default is "usc".
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
forestUnderstory Plant community forest overstory species data
forestUnderstory.symbol Plant species symbol
forestUnderstory.commonName Plant species common name
forestUnderstory.scientificName Plant species scientific name
forestUnderstory.plantType Plant type label
forestUnderstory.nativity Plant nativity
forestUnderstory.coverLow Cover low value (%)
forestUnderstory.coverHigh Cover high value (%)
forestUnderstory.canopyBottom Canopy bottom height (usc units: ft, metric units: m)
forestUnderstory.canopyTop Canopy top height (usc units: ft, metric units: m)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/forest-understory.json
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/forest-understory.json?measurementSystem=metric
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "forestUnderstory": [
        {
            "symbol": "PANIC",
            "commonName": "panicgrass",
            "scientificName": "Panicum",
            "plantType": "Grass/grass-like (Graminoids)",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "HEAR6",
            "commonName": "littlebrownjug",
            "scientificName": "Hexastylis arifolia",
            "plantType": "Forb/Herb",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 5,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "POPE",
            "commonName": "mayapple",
            "scientificName": "Podophyllum peltatum",
            "plantType": "Forb/Herb",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 5,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "MARAR",
            "commonName": "feathery false lily of the valley",
            "scientificName": "Maianthemum racemosum ssp. racemosum",
            "plantType": "Forb/Herb",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 2,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "OSMOR",
            "commonName": "sweetroot",
            "scientificName": "Osmorhiza",
            "plantType": "Forb/Herb",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "OXMO",
            "commonName": "mountain woodsorrel",
            "scientificName": "Oxalis montana",
            "plantType": "Forb/Herb",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.3
        },
        {
            "symbol": "PRSE",
            "commonName": "cankerweed",
            "scientificName": "Prenanthes serpentaria",
            "plantType": "Forb/Herb",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 1,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "TRILL",
            "commonName": "trillium",
            "scientificName": "Trillium",
            "plantType": "Forb/Herb",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "UVULA",
            "commonName": "bellwort",
            "scientificName": "Uvularia",
            "plantType": "Forb/Herb",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ARTR",
            "commonName": "Jack in the pulpit",
            "scientificName": "Arisaema triphyllum",
            "plantType": "Forb/Herb",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "DESMO",
            "commonName": "ticktrefoil",
            "scientificName": "Desmodium",
            "plantType": "Forb/Herb",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "EPRE2",
            "commonName": "trailing arbutus",
            "scientificName": "Epigaea repens",
            "plantType": "Forb/Herb",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "GACI2",
            "commonName": "licorice bedstraw",
            "scientificName": "Galium circaezans",
            "plantType": "Forb/Herb",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "VIOLA",
            "commonName": "violet",
            "scientificName": "Viola",
            "plantType": "Forb/Herb",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ACRAR",
            "commonName": "black bugbane",
            "scientificName": "Actaea racemosa var. racemosa",
            "plantType": "Forb/Herb",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "POAC4",
            "commonName": "Christmas fern",
            "scientificName": "Polystichum acrostichoides",
            "plantType": "Fern/fern ally",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 3,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "BRPA4",
            "commonName": "paper mulberry",
            "scientificName": "Broussonetia papyrifera",
            "plantType": "Shrub/Subshrub",
            "nativity": "Introduced",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 1,
            "canopyTop": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "VAAR",
            "commonName": "farkleberry",
            "scientificName": "Vaccinium arboreum",
            "plantType": "Shrub/Subshrub",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 2,
            "canopyTop": 4.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "VAAR",
            "commonName": "farkleberry",
            "scientificName": "Vaccinium arboreum",
            "plantType": "Shrub/Subshrub",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 4.5,
            "canopyTop": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "VAAR",
            "commonName": "farkleberry",
            "scientificName": "Vaccinium arboreum",
            "plantType": "Shrub/Subshrub",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0.5,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "VAAR",
            "commonName": "farkleberry",
            "scientificName": "Vaccinium arboreum",
            "plantType": "Shrub/Subshrub",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 1,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "AEPA",
            "commonName": "red buckeye",
            "scientificName": "Aesculus pavia",
            "plantType": "Shrub/Subshrub",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 1,
            "canopyTop": 4
        },
        {
            "symbol": "LISI",
            "commonName": "Chinese privet",
            "scientificName": "Ligustrum sinense",
            "plantType": "Shrub/Subshrub",
            "nativity": "Introduced",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ACRU",
            "commonName": "red maple",
            "scientificName": "Acer rubrum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 10,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "CECA4",
            "commonName": "eastern redbud",
            "scientificName": "Cercis canadensis",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 5,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "CECA4",
            "commonName": "eastern redbud",
            "scientificName": "Cercis canadensis",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 5,
            "canopyBottom": 4.5,
            "canopyTop": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ACSA3",
            "commonName": "sugar maple",
            "scientificName": "Acer saccharum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 5,
            "canopyBottom": 1,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ACSA3",
            "commonName": "sugar maple",
            "scientificName": "Acer saccharum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 5,
            "canopyBottom": 2,
            "canopyTop": 4.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ACSA3",
            "commonName": "sugar maple",
            "scientificName": "Acer saccharum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 5,
            "canopyBottom": 4.5,
            "canopyTop": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ACRU",
            "commonName": "red maple",
            "scientificName": "Acer rubrum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 4,
            "canopyBottom": 4.5,
            "canopyTop": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "FAGR",
            "commonName": "American beech",
            "scientificName": "Fagus grandifolia",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 2,
            "coverHigh": 4,
            "canopyBottom": 2,
            "canopyTop": 4
        },
        {
            "symbol": "QUVE",
            "commonName": "black oak",
            "scientificName": "Quercus velutina",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 2,
            "coverHigh": 4,
            "canopyBottom": 1,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "CAGL8",
            "commonName": "pignut hickory",
            "scientificName": "Carya glabra",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 3,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "CAGL8",
            "commonName": "pignut hickory",
            "scientificName": "Carya glabra",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 3,
            "canopyBottom": 4.5,
            "canopyTop": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ACSA3",
            "commonName": "sugar maple",
            "scientificName": "Acer saccharum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 3,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ACSA3",
            "commonName": "sugar maple",
            "scientificName": "Acer saccharum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 2,
            "canopyBottom": 0.5,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "OXAR",
            "commonName": "sourwood",
            "scientificName": "Oxydendrum arboreum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 2,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "FRAM2",
            "commonName": "white ash",
            "scientificName": "Fraxinus americana",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 2,
            "canopyBottom": 0.5,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "CAGL8",
            "commonName": "pignut hickory",
            "scientificName": "Carya glabra",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 2,
            "canopyBottom": 1,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "NYSY",
            "commonName": "blackgum",
            "scientificName": "Nyssa sylvatica",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 2,
            "canopyBottom": 4.5,
            "canopyTop": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "FAGR",
            "commonName": "American beech",
            "scientificName": "Fagus grandifolia",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 2,
            "canopyBottom": 0.5,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "FAGR",
            "commonName": "American beech",
            "scientificName": "Fagus grandifolia",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 2,
            "canopyBottom": 4.5,
            "canopyTop": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "QUVE",
            "commonName": "black oak",
            "scientificName": "Quercus velutina",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "QUVE",
            "commonName": "black oak",
            "scientificName": "Quercus velutina",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0.5,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ULMUS",
            "commonName": "elm",
            "scientificName": "Ulmus",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 5,
            "canopyTop": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ASTR",
            "commonName": "pawpaw",
            "scientificName": "Asimina triloba",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 5,
            "canopyTop": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "QUAL",
            "commonName": "white oak",
            "scientificName": "Quercus alba",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "PRSE2",
            "commonName": "black cherry",
            "scientificName": "Prunus serotina",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "FAGR",
            "commonName": "American beech",
            "scientificName": "Fagus grandifolia",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 1,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "CAGL8",
            "commonName": "pignut hickory",
            "scientificName": "Carya glabra",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 2,
            "canopyTop": 4.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "NYSY",
            "commonName": "blackgum",
            "scientificName": "Nyssa sylvatica",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ACRU",
            "commonName": "red maple",
            "scientificName": "Acer rubrum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0.5,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ACRU",
            "commonName": "red maple",
            "scientificName": "Acer rubrum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 1,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ACRU",
            "commonName": "red maple",
            "scientificName": "Acer rubrum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 2,
            "canopyTop": 4.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "OXAR",
            "commonName": "sourwood",
            "scientificName": "Oxydendrum arboreum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0.5,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "OXAR",
            "commonName": "sourwood",
            "scientificName": "Oxydendrum arboreum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 2,
            "canopyTop": 4.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "OXAR",
            "commonName": "sourwood",
            "scientificName": "Oxydendrum arboreum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 4.5,
            "canopyTop": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "SAAL5",
            "commonName": "sassafras",
            "scientificName": "Sassafras albidum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "SAAL5",
            "commonName": "sassafras",
            "scientificName": "Sassafras albidum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0.5,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "SAAL5",
            "commonName": "sassafras",
            "scientificName": "Sassafras albidum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 1,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "SAAL5",
            "commonName": "sassafras",
            "scientificName": "Sassafras albidum",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 2,
            "canopyTop": 4.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "LIST2",
            "commonName": "sweetgum",
            "scientificName": "Liquidambar styraciflua",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "LIST2",
            "commonName": "sweetgum",
            "scientificName": "Liquidambar styraciflua",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 1,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "LIST2",
            "commonName": "sweetgum",
            "scientificName": "Liquidambar styraciflua",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 2,
            "canopyTop": 4.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "FRAM2",
            "commonName": "white ash",
            "scientificName": "Fraxinus americana",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "FRAM2",
            "commonName": "white ash",
            "scientificName": "Fraxinus americana",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 1,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "FRAM2",
            "commonName": "white ash",
            "scientificName": "Fraxinus americana",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 2,
            "canopyTop": 4.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "LITU",
            "commonName": "tuliptree",
            "scientificName": "Liriodendron tulipifera",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "LITU",
            "commonName": "tuliptree",
            "scientificName": "Liriodendron tulipifera",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0.5,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "LITU",
            "commonName": "tuliptree",
            "scientificName": "Liriodendron tulipifera",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 1,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "AEFL",
            "commonName": "yellow buckeye",
            "scientificName": "Aesculus flava",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 2,
            "canopyTop": 4.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "COFL2",
            "commonName": "flowering dogwood",
            "scientificName": "Cornus florida",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "COFL2",
            "commonName": "flowering dogwood",
            "scientificName": "Cornus florida",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0.5,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "COFL2",
            "commonName": "flowering dogwood",
            "scientificName": "Cornus florida",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 1,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "COFL2",
            "commonName": "flowering dogwood",
            "scientificName": "Cornus florida",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 2,
            "canopyTop": 4.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "QURU",
            "commonName": "northern red oak",
            "scientificName": "Quercus rubra",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "FRCA13",
            "commonName": "Carolina buckthorn",
            "scientificName": "Frangula caroliniana",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 4.5,
            "canopyTop": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "ULRU",
            "commonName": "slippery elm",
            "scientificName": "Ulmus rubra",
            "plantType": "Tree",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0.5,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "VIRO3",
            "commonName": "muscadine",
            "scientificName": "Vitis rotundifolia",
            "plantType": "Vine/Liana",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 5,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 2
        },
        {
            "symbol": "PAQU2",
            "commonName": "Virginia creeper",
            "scientificName": "Parthenocissus quinquefolia",
            "plantType": "Vine/Liana",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 3,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "SMILA2",
            "commonName": "greenbrier",
            "scientificName": "Smilax",
            "plantType": "Vine/Liana",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 2,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "LOJA",
            "commonName": "Japanese honeysuckle",
            "scientificName": "Lonicera japonica",
            "plantType": "Vine/Liana",
            "nativity": "Introduced",
            "coverLow": 0.5,
            "coverHigh": 2,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "BICA",
            "commonName": "crossvine",
            "scientificName": "Bignonia capreolata",
            "plantType": "Vine/Liana",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 2,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 5
        },
        {
            "symbol": "CEOR7",
            "commonName": "Oriental bittersweet",
            "scientificName": "Celastrus orbiculatus",
            "plantType": "Vine/Liana",
            "nativity": "Introduced",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "EUFO5",
            "commonName": "winter creeper",
            "scientificName": "Euonymus fortunei",
            "plantType": "Vine/Liana",
            "nativity": "Introduced",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 1
        },
        {
            "symbol": "TORA2",
            "commonName": "eastern poison ivy",
            "scientificName": "Toxicodendron radicans",
            "plantType": "Vine/Liana",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 0,
            "coverHigh": 1,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 13
        },
        {
            "symbol": "COAM",
            "commonName": "American cancer-root",
            "scientificName": "Conopholis americana",
            "plantType": "Nonvascular",
            "nativity": "Native",
            "coverLow": 1,
            "coverHigh": 5,
            "canopyBottom": 0,
            "canopyTop": 0.5
        }
    ]
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Plant community ground cover

This service returns a JSON file of ground cover data for the specified state and transition model plant community.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/plant-community-tables/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/{landUse}/{state}/{community}/ground-cover.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
landUse path required Land use sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include land uses)
state path required Ecosystem state sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include ecosystem states)
community path required Plant community sequence
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
groundCover Plant community ground cover data
groundCover.{material} Material code (1=Tree; 2=Shrub/vine/liana; 3=Grass/grasslike; 4=Forb; 5=Non-vascular plants; 6=Biological crusts; 7=Litter; 8=Surface fragments > 0.25" and <= 3"; 9=Surface fragments > 3"; 10=Bedrock; 11=Water; 12=Bare ground)
groundCover.{material}.low Cover low value (%)
groundCover.{material}.high Cover high value (%)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/ground-cover.json
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "groundCover": {
        "1": {
            "low": "",
            "high": ""
        },
        "2": {
            "low": "",
            "high": ""
        },
        "3": {
            "low": "",
            "high": ""
        },
        "4": {
            "low": "",
            "high": ""
        },
        "5": {
            "low": "",
            "high": ""
        },
        "6": {
            "low": "",
            "high": ""
        },
        "7": {
            "low": "",
            "high": ""
        },
        "8": {
            "low": "",
            "high": ""
        },
        "9": {
            "low": "",
            "high": ""
        },
        "10": {
            "low": "",
            "high": ""
        },
        "11": {
            "low": "",
            "high": ""
        },
        "12": {
            "low": "",
            "high": ""
        }
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Plant community rangeland plant composition

This service returns a JSON file of rangeland plant composition data for the specified state and transition model plant community.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/plant-community-tables/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/{landUse}/{state}/{community}/rangeland-plant-composition.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
landUse path required Land use sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include land uses)
state path required Ecosystem state sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include ecosystem states)
community path required Plant community sequence
measurementSystem query optional Measurement system ("usc" or "metric"). Default is "usc".
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
rangeComposition Plant community rangeland plant composition data
rangeComposition.{plantType} Plant type label
rangeComposition.{plantType}.group Plant group number
rangeComposition.{plantType}.groupName Plant group name
rangeComposition.{plantType}.customGroup Custom plant group label
rangeComposition.{plantType}.symbol Plant species symbol
rangeComposition.{plantType}.commonName Plant species common name
rangeComposition.{plantType}.scientificName Plant species scientific name
rangeComposition.{plantType}.productionLow Plant production low value (usc units: lb/acre, metric units: kg/hectare)
rangeComposition.{plantType}.productionHigh Plant production high value (usc units: lb/acre, metric units: kg/hectare)
rangeComposition.{plantType}.coverLow Plant cover low value (%)
rangeComposition.{plantType}.coverHigh Plant cover high value (%)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/rangeland-plant-composition.json
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/rangeland-plant-composition.json?measurementSystem=metric
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "rangeComposition": []
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Plant community snag count

This service returns a JSON file of snag count data for the specified state and transition model plant community.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/plant-community-tables/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/{landUse}/{state}/{community}/snag-count.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
landUse path required Land use sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include land uses)
state path required Ecosystem state sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include ecosystem states)
community path required Plant community sequence
measurementSystem query optional Measurement system ("usc" or "metric"). Default is "usc".
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
snagCount Plant community snag count data
snagCount.hardSnagMin Minimum number of hard snags (usc units: count/acre, metric units: count/hect)
snagCount.hardSnagMax Maximum number of hard snags (usc units: count/acre, metric units: count/hect)
snagCount.softSnagMin Minimum number of soft snags (usc units: count/acre, metric units: count/hect)
snagCount.softSnagMax Maximum number of soft snags (usc units: count/acre, metric units: count/hect)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/snag-count.json
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/snag-count.json?measurementSystem=metric
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "snagCount": {
        "hardSnagMin": 0,
        "hardSnagMax": 10,
        "softSnagMin": 0,
        "softSnagMax": 20
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Plant community soil surface cover

This service returns a JSON file of soil surface cover data for the specified state and transition model plant community.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/plant-community-tables/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/{landUse}/{state}/{community}/soil-surface-cover.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
landUse path required Land use sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include land uses)
state path required Ecosystem state sequence (specify 1 if the state and transition model does not include ecosystem states)
community path required Plant community sequence
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
soilSurfaceCover Plant community snag count data
soilSurfaceCover.{material} Material code (1=Tree; 2=Shrub/vine/liana; 3=Grass/grasslike; 4=Forb; 5=Non-vascular plants; 6=Biological crusts; 7=Litter; 8=Surface fragments > 0.25" and <= 3"; 9=Surface fragments > 3"; 10=Bedrock; 11=Water; 12=Bare ground)
soilSurfaceCover.{material}.low Cover low value (%)
soilSurfaceCover.{material}.high Cover high value (%)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/soil-surface-cover.json
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "soilSurfaceCover": {
        "1": {
            "low": 0,
            "high": 1
        },
        "2": {
            "low": 0,
            "high": 1
        },
        "3": {
            "low": 1,
            "high": 2
        },
        "4": {
            "low": 3,
            "high": 5
        },
        "5": {
            "low": 0,
            "high": 1
        },
        "6": {
            "low": 0,
            "high": 0
        },
        "7": {
            "low": 60,
            "high": 89
        },
        "8": {
            "low": 0,
            "high": 5
        },
        "9": {
            "low": 2,
            "high": 15
        },
        "10": {
            "low": 0,
            "high": 0
        },
        "11": {
            "low": 0,
            "high": 0
        },
        "12": {
            "low": 0,
            "high": 0
        }
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Plant community woody ground cover

This service returns a JSON file of woody ground cover data for the specified state and transition model plant community.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/plant-community-tables/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/{landUse}/{state}/{community}/woody-ground-cover.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
community path required Ecological state ID
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
woodyGroundCover Plant community snag count data
woodyGroundCover.{material} Material code (13=Down wood, fine-small; 14=Down wood, fine-medium; 15=Down wood, fine-large; 16=Down wood, coarse-small; 17=Down wood, coarse-large; 19=Hard snags; 20=Soft snags)
woodyGroundCover.{material}.low Cover low value (%)
woodyGroundCover.{material}.high Cover high value (%)
woodyGroundCover.{material}.class Decomposition class (N: no or little integration with the soil surface, I: partial to nearly full integration with the soil surface)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/woody-ground-cover.json
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "woodyGroundCover": {
        "13": {
            "low": 0,
            "high": 5,
            "decompositionClass": ""
        },
        "14": {
            "low": 0,
            "high": 5,
            "decompositionClass": ""
        },
        "15": {
            "low": 0,
            "high": 7,
            "decompositionClass": ""
        },
        "16": {
            "low": 0,
            "high": 7,
            "decompositionClass": ""
        },
        "17": {
            "low": 0,
            "high": 6,
            "decompositionClass": ""
        },
        "19": {
            "low": "",
            "high": "",
            "decompositionClass": ""
        },
        "20": {
            "low": "",
            "high": "",
            "decompositionClass": ""
        }
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Reference sheet description

This service returns a JSON file of reference sheet data for the specified ecological class. Data for all description sections can be obtained using the Class Description web service.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/descriptions/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/reference-sheet.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
measurementSystem query optional Measurement system ("usc" or "metric"). Default is "usc".
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
referenceSheet Reference sheet data
referenceSheet.authors Reference sheet authors
referenceSheet.authorContact Reference sheet lead author contact
referenceSheet.date Reference sheet publication date
referenceSheet.compositionMetric Metric that indicators 10 and 12 are based on
referenceSheet.litterCover Litter cover value(s) for indicator 14
referenceSheet.litterDepth Litter depth value(s) for indicator 14
referenceSheet.narratives Reference sheet indicator narratives
referenceSheet.narratives.rills Rills narrative (indicator 1)
referenceSheet.narratives.waterFlow Water flow narrative (indicator 2)
referenceSheet.narratives.erosionalPedestals Erosional pedestals narrative (indicator 3)
referenceSheet.narratives.bareGround Bare ground narrative (indicator 4)
referenceSheet.narratives.gullies Gullies narrative (indicator 5)
referenceSheet.narratives.windErosion Wind erosion narrative (indicator 6)
referenceSheet.narratives.litterMovement Litter movement narrative (indicator 7)
referenceSheet.narratives.soilStability Soil stability narrative (indicator 8)
referenceSheet.narratives.soilStructure Soil structure narrative (indicator 9)
referenceSheet.narratives.plantEffects Plant effects narrative (indicator 10)
referenceSheet.narratives.soilCompaction Soil compaction narrative (indicator 11)
referenceSheet.narratives.funGroupDominant Dominant functional groups (indicator 12)
referenceSheet.narratives.funGroupSubdominant Subdominant functional groups (indicator 12)
referenceSheet.narratives.funGroupOther Other functional groups (indicator 12)
referenceSheet.narratives.funGroupNotes Functional group notes (indicator 12)
referenceSheet.narratives.plantMortality Plant mortality narrative (indicator 13)
referenceSheet.narratives.litterNotes Litter notes narrative (indicator 14)
referenceSheet.narratives.annualProduction Annual production narrative (indicator 15)
referenceSheet.narratives.invasiveSpecies Invasive species narrative (indicator 16)
referenceSheet.narratives.reproductiveCapacity Reproductive capacity narrative (indicator 17)
otherIndicators Other custom indicators
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/reference-sheet.json
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/reference-sheet.json?measurementSystem=metric
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "referenceSheet": {
        "authors": "",
        "authorContact": "",
        "date": "",
        "compositionMetric": "Annual Production",
        "litterCover": "",
        "litterDepth": "",
        "narratives": {
            "rills": "",
            "waterFlow": "",
            "erosionalPedestals": "",
            "bareGround": "",
            "gullies": "",
            "windErosion": "",
            "litterMovement": "",
            "soilStability": "",
            "soilStructure": "",
            "plantEffects": "",
            "soilCompaction": "",
            "funGroupDominant": "",
            "funGroupSubdominant": "",
            "funGroupOther": "",
            "funGroupNotes": "",
            "plantMortality": "",
            "litterNotes": "",
            "annualProduction": "",
            "invasiveSpecies": "",
            "reproductiveCapacity": ""
        },
        "otherIndicators": [],
        "approver": "",
        "publicationDate": ""
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Soil features description

This service returns a JSON file of soil features data for the specified ecological class. Data for all description sections can be obtained using the Class Description web service.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/descriptions/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/soil-features.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
measurementSystem query optional Measurement system ("usc" or "metric"). Default is "usc".
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
soilFeatures Soil features description data
soilFeatures.narratives Soil features narratives
soilFeatures.narratives.soilFeatures Soil features narrative
soilFeatures.images Soil features images
soilFeatures.images.path Image path
soilFeatures.images.orientation Image orientation
soilFeatures.images.caption Image caption
soilFeatures.texture Soil texture data
soilFeatures.texture.texture Soil texture class
soilFeatures.texture.modifier1 Soil texture modifier 1
soilFeatures.texture.modifier2 Soil texture modifier 2
soilFeatures.texture.modifier3 Soil texture modifier 3
soilFeatures.texture.termInLieu Term used in lieu of a soil texture class
soilFeatures.parentMaterial Parent material data
soilFeatures.parentMaterial.kind Parent material kind
soilFeatures.parentMaterial.origin Parent material origin
soilFeatures.parentMaterial.kindDesc Parent material kind description
soilFeatures.parentMaterial.originDesc Parent material origin description
soilFeatures.nominalProperties Nominal soil property
soilFeatures.nominalProperties.property Nominal soil property name
soilFeatures.nominalProperties.value Nominal soil property value
soilFeatures.nominalProperties.description Description of the nominal soil property value
soilFeatures.ordinalProperties Ordinal soil properties
soilFeatures.ordinalProperties.property Ordinal soil property name
soilFeatures.ordinalProperties.representativeLow Ordinal soil property low value
soilFeatures.ordinalProperties.representativeHigh Ordinal soil property representative high value
soilFeatures.ordinalProperties.rangeLow Ordinal soil property range low value
soilFeatures.ordinalProperties.rangeHigh Ordinal soil property range high value
soilFeatures.ordinalProperties.representativeLowDescription Ordinal soil property representative low value description
soilFeatures.ordinalProperties.representativeHighDescription Ordinal soil property representative high value description
soilFeatures.ordinalProperties.rangeLowDescription Ordinal soil property range low value description
soilFeatures.ordinalProperties.rangeHighDescription Ordinal soil property range high value description
soilFeatures.intervalProperties Interval soil properties
soilFeatures.intervalProperties.property Interval soil property name
soilFeatures.intervalProperties.unit Interval soil property measurement unit
soilFeatures.intervalProperties.representativeLow Interval soil property representative low value
soilFeatures.intervalProperties.representativeHigh Interval soil property representative high value
soilFeatures.intervalProperties.rangeLow Interval soil property range low value
soilFeatures.intervalProperties.rangeHigh Interval soil property range high value
soilFeatures.profileProperties Profile soil properties
soilFeatures.profileProperties.property Profile soil property name
soilFeatures.profileProperties.unit Profile soil property measurement unit
soilFeatures.profileProperties.topDepth Top depth of the soil profile segment being described
soilFeatures.profileProperties.bottomDepth Bottom depth of the soil profile segment being described
soilFeatures.profileProperties.representativeLow Profile soil property representative low value
soilFeatures.profileProperties.representativeHigh Profile soil property representative high value
soilFeatures.profileProperties.rangeLow Profile soil property range low value
soilFeatures.profileProperties.rangeHigh Profile soil property range high value
soilFeatures.propertyRangeCount Number of non-empty range entries for ordinal, interval, and profile soil properties combined
soilFeatures.propertyRVCount Number of non-empty representative value entries for ordinal, interval, and profile soil properties combined
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/soil-features.json
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/soil-features.json?measurementSystem
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "soilFeatures": {
        "narratives": {
            "soilFeatures": "This ecological site is represented by soils in the Ultisols soil order. Major soil series for this ecological site are Pailo, Bodine, Fullerton, and Minvale. Map units having these soils as both major and minor components, either in consociations or complexes, make up the majority of the ecological site.  These soils have a thermic temperature regime and an udic moisture regime.  They are extremely deep, well drained, highly weathered, and acidic.  Soils associated with this ecological site formed in colluvium or soil creep, over the underlying residuum from cherty dolomitic limestone and from residuum from cherty dolomitic limestone.  \r\n\r\nIn general, Ultisols are formed from parent materials that contain small amounts of basic cations.  The Ultisols in this ecological site description are derived from cherty dolomitic limestone.  In weathering, the dolomite produces silica. The silica accumulates in the soil as chert.  Chert produced during weathering is generally porous and cavernous, but in some areas, it is massive. Water availability generally goes down as the percentage of chert goes up (Martin 1989).  This can affect the local distribution of plant species within this site.  Being silica based, the reaction of soils weathered from cherty dolomitic limestone range from strongly acid to extremely strongly acid in the particle size control section. Soils weathering from the cherty dolomitic limestone have mineralogy from siliceous to kaolinitic.  The particle size family for these soils includes fine-loamy, loamy-skeletal, and fine. Drainage classes for the selected soil series are well drained and somewhat excessively drained.   \r\n\r\nThe parent materials and landforms in this physiographic province are geologically old.  These soils have become highly weathered and leached over time due to the age of parent materials, thermic temperature regime and udic moisture regime, leaving soils with a naturally low nutrient content, low base status, and high subsoil acidity. These become limitations from an agricultural and timber standpoint but can be easily overcome by adequate application of lime, fertilizer, and use of best management practices (Buol et al., 1997)."
        },
        "images": [
            {
                "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/es/14968.jpg",
                "orientation": "portrait",
                "caption": "Fullerton series soil profile"
            }
        ],
        "texture": [
            {
                "texture": "Silt loam",
                "modifier1": "Gravelly",
                "modifier2": "",
                "modifier3": "",
                "termInLieu": ""
            },
            {
                "texture": "Loam",
                "modifier1": "Very gravelly",
                "modifier2": "",
                "modifier3": "",
                "termInLieu": ""
            },
            {
                "texture": "Silty clay loam",
                "modifier1": "Extremely gravelly",
                "modifier2": "",
                "modifier3": "",
                "termInLieu": ""
            }
        ],
        "parentMaterial": [
            {
                "kind": "Residuum",
                "origin": "Chert",
                "kindDesc": "Unconsolidated, weathered, or partly weathered mineral material that accumulates by disintegration of bedrock in place.",
                "originDesc": "A hard, extremely dense or compact, dull to semivitreous, cryptocrystalline sedimentary rock, consisting dominantly of interlocking crystals of quartz less than about 30 mm in diameter; it may contain amorphous silica (opal). It sometimes contains impurities such as calcite, iron oxide, or the remains of silicious and other organisims. It has a tough, splintery to conchoidal fracture and may be white or variously colored gray, green, blue, pink, red, yellow, brown, and black. Chet occurs principally as nodular or concretionary segregations in limestones and dolomites."
            },
            {
                "kind": "Colluvium",
                "origin": "Dolomite",
                "kindDesc": "Unconsolidated, unsorted earth material being transported or deposited on side slopes and/or at the base of slopes by mass movement (e.g. direct gravitational action) and by local, unconcentrated runoff.",
                "originDesc": "A carbonate sedimentary rock consisting chiefly (more than 50 percent by weight or by areal percentages under the microscope) of the mineral dolomite."
            },
            {
                "kind": "Creep deposits",
                "origin": "Cherty limestone",
                "kindDesc": "Sediment resulting from slow mass movement of earth material down slopes, caused by gravity but facilitated by saturation with water and alternate freezing and thawing.",
                "originDesc": " "
            }
        ],
        "nominalProperties": [
            {
                "property": "Family particle size",
                "value": "clayey",
                "description": "Reference: Keys to Soil Taxonomy Twelfth Edition, Soil Survey Staff, USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service"
            }
        ],
        "ordinalProperties": [
            {
                "property": "Drainage class",
                "representativeLow": "Well drained",
                "representativeHigh": "Somewhat excessively drained",
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": "",
                "representativeLowDesc": " ",
                "representativeHighDesc": " ",
                "rangeLowDesc": "",
                "rangeHighDesc": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Permeability class",
                "representativeLow": "Moderate",
                "representativeHigh": "Rapid",
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": "",
                "representativeLowDesc": "",
                "representativeHighDesc": "",
                "rangeLowDesc": "",
                "rangeHighDesc": ""
            }
        ],
        "intervalProperties": [
            {
                "property": "Soil depth",
                "unit": "in",
                "representativeLow": 60,
                "representativeHigh": 203,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Surface fragment cover <=3\"",
                "unit": "%",
                "representativeLow": 6,
                "representativeHigh": 40,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Surface fragment cover >3\"",
                "unit": "%",
                "representativeLow": 0,
                "representativeHigh": 18,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            }
        ],
        "profileProperties": [
            {
                "property": "Available water capacity",
                "unit": "in",
                "topDepth": 0,
                "bottomDepth": 40,
                "representativeLow": 1,
                "representativeHigh": 8.1,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Soil reaction (1:1 water)",
                "unit": "",
                "topDepth": 0,
                "bottomDepth": 40,
                "representativeLow": 4,
                "representativeHigh": 6,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Subsurface fragment volume <=3\"",
                "unit": "%",
                "topDepth": "",
                "bottomDepth": "",
                "representativeLow": 13,
                "representativeHigh": 58,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            },
            {
                "property": "Subsurface fragment volume >3\"",
                "unit": "%",
                "topDepth": "",
                "bottomDepth": "",
                "representativeLow": 0,
                "representativeHigh": 23,
                "rangeLow": "",
                "rangeHigh": ""
            }
        ],
        "propertyRVCount": 9,
        "propertyRangeCount": 0
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

State and transition model states

This service returns a JSON file of state and transition model land use, ecosystem state, and plant community data for the specified ecological class.

Availability
                  All catalogs
                
Path
                  /services/models/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/states.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
states State and transition model states
states.type State type ("land use", "ecosystem state", or "plant community")
states.landUse Land use sequence
states.state Ecosystem state sequence
states.community Plant community sequence
states.narratives State narratives
states.narratives.name State name
states.narratives.description State description narrative
states.narratives.characteristicsIndicators State characteristics and indicators narrative
states.narratives.management State management narrative
states.images State images
states.images.path Image path
states.images.orientation Image orientation
states.images.caption Image caption
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/models/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/states.json
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "states": [
        {
            "type": "ecosystem state",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 1,
            "community": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "Reference State - Upland Oak/Hickory Forest ",
                "description": "The reference state for this ecological site is characterized by a closed-canopy hardwood forest dominated by oaks and hickories.  In order for this reference state to be maintained, the oak/hickory species must be present in multiple age classes.  In most cases red maple, sugar maple and American beech are colonizing the midstory and understory.  A species composition shift toward these more mesophytic species is widely recognized throughout the eastern United States (McEwan et al., 2011).  \r\n\r\nThe reference state described here represents a condition dependent on complex, multiple disturbances, some of which are human caused. In order to get oak to succeed and recruit into the next stand, advanced oak regeneration must be present before a major canopy disturbance.  Oaks must be able to reach a size that is competitive (through smaller-scale disturbances such as fire or herbicide of midstory, or tree planting with vigorous seedlings or saplings), then there needs to be a canopy disturbance.  There may need to be additional disturbances to get rid of competition.",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": []
        },
        {
            "type": "ecosystem state",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 2,
            "community": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "High-graded Forest State",
                "description": "Forests in the high graded state have been logged using diameter-limit cut methods multiple times in most cases.  This results in a stand with undesirable species composition, low vigor, and poor health. The genetic quality of the forest has been depleted due to the best trees being taken out over time. \r\n\r\nWhile oak and hickory species are often still present in this state, individual trees are often \"wolfy\" and defective.  These are the trees that would have been undesirable from a timber perspective and so left after multiple entries of logging.  Notably, hickory has often been left because sawmills historically did not have the capability to process them.    ",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": []
        },
        {
            "type": "ecosystem state",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 3,
            "community": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "Post Large-scale Disturbance Forest State",
                "description": "Stand initiating disturbances such as a clearcut result in a young, regenerating, even-aged forest stand.  ",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": []
        },
        {
            "type": "ecosystem state",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 4,
            "community": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "Grazed Forest State",
                "description": "This state represents a condition resulting from uncontrolled access to a forest by livestock and is not meant to address plant community changes as a result of prescribed grazing, which can be quite different.\r\n\r\n",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": []
        },
        {
            "type": "ecosystem state",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 5,
            "community": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "Post Agricultural Abandonment Forest State",
                "description": "This state results from natural succession to forest after abandonment of agricultural fields.  The resulting forest will vary depending on the amount of time the land was in cultivation, the type of agricultural practice that was used (e.g., row crops, pasture, type of crop, etc.), and the degree of impact to the soil.\r\n\r\nIn Georgia, parts of this state have been converted to loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations, but that acreage is of relatively small extent and so it is not included as a community phase.     ",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": []
        },
        {
            "type": "ecosystem state",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 6,
            "community": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "Cleared Grassland State",
                "description": "This state represents a once-forested area now cleared for pasture.  Most pastures are very old and have been established for a long time.  Management practices focus primarily on maintaining healthy pasture conditions rather than new pasture establishment, although that is certainly an option.  Balancing stocking rates, grazing rotation, and nutrient inputs are the primary management concerns. \r\n\r\nIn general, pasture management recommendations focus on maximizing desirable forage species to outcompete undesirable or weedy species.  Production practices that result in overgrazing and low fertility levels favor emergence, propagation, and growth of weeds (Green et al., 2006).  Effective pasture management includes the following practices:\r\n\r\n- maintaining proper soil pH and fertility levels\r\n\r\n- using controlled grazing practices\r\n\r\n- mowing at proper timing and stage of maturity\r\n\r\n- allowing new seedlings to become well established before use, and\r\n\r\n- renovating pastures when needed (Green et al. 2006).\r\n\r\nTennessee has developed a list of desirable species, intermediate species and undesirable species for use in a Pasture Condition Scoresheet, which can be used to develop management recommendations on a site by site basis.  District Conservationists as well as the State Grazing Specialist can be consulted to assist in developing management recommendations.  \r\n\r\nPerilla (Perilla frutescens) mint is an exotic, invasive weed that has become a major problem in many pastures.  It causes more cattle deaths (in Tennessee) than any other toxic plant (Steckel and Rhodes, 2007).  Keeping a ready supply of quality feed available for farm animals in the late summer and early fall will help to minimize the risk to livestock.  Cattle will not normally feed on perilla unless there is a shortage of other feed.",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": []
        },
        {
            "type": "plant community",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 1,
            "community": 1,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "White oak - pignut hickory",
                "description": "This phase is dominated by oaks and hickories in the overstory currently, but mid-story composition is shifting toward more shade and moisture-loving species.  The understory is relatively rich in herbaceous diversity (including vines) but tree regeneration overwhelmingly favors the shade-tolerant species.\r\n\r\nFor this phase to regenerate back to oak and hickory, numerous complex and site-specific factors may be necessary.  These include acorn production, seedling establishment, advanced regeneration from seedlings, and timely release (Brose et al., 2013).  Several types of management can be employed to this end including prescribed fire, mechanical and chemical competition control, site preparation, and planting.  However, depending on the stand and its history, management for oak/hickory is typically intensive and often requires multiple treatments over time (~10 - 25 years), (Loftis, 2004).  \r\n\r\nWithout intensive management, in most cases, stands will naturally succeed to a more mesophytic forest type dominated by shade tolerant species (the maples and American beech).  Dendroecology studies in nearby, very similar old-growth forest stands indicate that oak species have dominated stands for the past 300 years.  They speculate that the recent proliferation of maples in the understory will inhibit regeneration of oak and pine under the current disturbance regime (Hart et al., 2012).  Oak and hickory can regenerate in canopy gaps formed by uprooted trees, but only on very dry sites, indicating that gap-phase dynamics will favor maple overall (Hart and Kupfer, 2011).\r\n\r\nThe American chestnut was an important part of this ecological site prior to decimation by the chestnut blight, but it is unclear how abundant it would have been.  Colloquial estimates based on local names like \"Chestnut Ridge\" indicate that it may have been prolific.  Sprouts from old chestnut stumps were noted often during field sampling.  Sprouts rarely survive to flowering age, but can often reach as much as 8 inches diameter at breast height (DBH) before they succumb to the blight.  Rarely, an American chestnut sprout will reach larger size classes and survive to flower.",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": [
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/7306.jpg",
                    "caption": "Oak-Hickory state"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "portrait",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6434.jpg",
                    "caption": "Canopy cover"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6436.jpg",
                    "caption": "Overstory in spring"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6438.jpg",
                    "caption": "Overstory in winter"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6440.jpg",
                    "caption": "Spring understory"
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "type": "plant community",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 1,
            "community": 2,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "Maple species - American beech ",
                "description": "This community phase has not yet been attained in most cases because forests currently dominated by oaks and hickories are in transition.  Without management or large-scale disturbance, stands will naturally succeed to more mesophytic species composition in the overstory and the oaks and hickories will lose their dominance over time.  Small-scale gap dynamics caused by tree throws would likely be a natural part of this state and would favor the maple component in forest stands (Hart et al. 2012).\r\n\r\nA recent study of red maple on the nearby Cumberland Plateau found that canopy accession strategy and climate-growth relationships are critical factors in the shift from state 1.1 to state 1.2 (Hart et al., 2012).  Red maples are gap-opportunists and can take advantage of smaller-scale disturbances such as tree-throws.  Oaks in contrast, seem to have needed high frequency, intense disturbances to establish their current dominance in the forest.   \r\n\r\nRed maples do best in times of cool, wet springs preceded by wet autumns and warm winters (Hart et al. 2012).  Depending on climate conditions in the coming years, the weather may or may not favor their continued establishment.  Red maple might also cause local environmental changes that facilitate perpetuation of favorable conditions for regeneration such as modification of understory light levels and soil characteristics (Nowacki and Abrams 2008).  The denser canopies might reduce understory temperature and increase relative humidity, which would also favor the more shade-tolerant, moisture loving state (Alexander and Arthur 2010).\r\n\r\nPrescribed fire has been suggested as a management tool to reverse the trend.  While it may be a useful tool in some cases and most likely in combination with other management approaches, using fire alone is unlikely to produce the desired results in most stands (Clark and Schweitzer 2013).",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": [
                {
                    "orientation": "portrait",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6450.jpg",
                    "caption": "Maple midstory"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6451.jpg",
                    "caption": "Maple regeneration"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "portrait",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6453.jpg",
                    "caption": "Gap dynamics"
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "type": "plant community",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 2,
            "community": 1,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "American beech - Sugar maple/Sourwood - Sassafras",
                "description": "Canopies in the high graded state are generally thick enough to prevent adequate oak regeneration; more shade tolerant species such as red maple, sugar maple and American beech will predominate.  Oak and hickory species that remain are typically of low genetic quality in terms of timber.  Stands that have been high graded multiple times often show a conspicuous lack of white oak and northern red oak.",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": [
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6969.jpg",
                    "caption": "High graded forest"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6970.jpg",
                    "caption": "Mid-story"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6496.jpg",
                    "caption": "High graded forest in the fall"
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "type": "plant community",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 3,
            "community": 1,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "Tuliptree-red maple/sumac-sassafas/American burnweed-blackberry",
                "description": "Early after a stand-initiating disturbance, dense stands of Erechtites hieraciifolius (American burnweed) can become established and are a natural part of succession on this site.  Blackberry and sumac also occur early in succession and will naturally give way to hardwoods over time.\r\n\r\nSpecies composition of canopy trees in young stands varies, but generally includes abundant tuliptree (McGrath and Clatterbuck, 2013).  If the maples are not controlled with herbicide in the early stages of stand development, they may also be prevalent in the canopy.  \r\n\r\nOther woody species include sassafras, redbud, flowering dogwood, white ash, sourwood, black gum, and Carolina buckthorn, among others. Oak species will generally regenerate by sprouting.  White oak can live for long periods as an overtopped tree.  It responds to quick release and so can eventually recover its dominant position in the stand canopy.  Other advanced-succession species, which will become important in older stands include most of the other upland oaks, blackgum, red maple, and American beech.  \r\n\r\nMaple and beech are natural components of upland mixed hardwoods.  However, if they are not controlled in the early stages of stand development, oaks will have difficulty competing in stands that were severely high-graded.  If natural regeneration does not produce enough oaks, artificial regeneration (i.e., planting) may be needed.",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": [
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6497.jpg",
                    "caption": "Tornado damage"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6498.jpg",
                    "caption": "Tornado swath"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6971.jpg",
                    "caption": "Small clearcut (recent)"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6972.jpg",
                    "caption": "Tuliptree stump sprout "
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6975.jpg",
                    "caption": "Litter and downed wood"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6976.jpg",
                    "caption": "American burnweed, 18 months post tornado "
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "type": "plant community",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 4,
            "community": 1,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "White oak-sweetgum/Eastern red cedar/blackberry-broomsedge",
                "description": "Grazing in forested stands results in a reduction of native ground cover plants (Johnson, 1952).  Cattle will selectively graze on the plants they find most palatable.  Often they leave little in the understory.  Plants they avoid include greenbriar, blackberry, broomsedge (Andropogon virginicus), the privets (Ligustrum spp.), Eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana), and Christmas fern.  Additionally, livestock find seedlings and saplings of the more valuable timber species (such as the oaks) more palatable and lower quality trees will proliferate as a result (SCS, 1992). Eastern red cedar can become invasive in grazed forest stands because cattle do not eat it.  Over time, this can result in an overstory dominated by the trees that were present prior to grazing, usually including oaks, hickories, sweetgum, black cherry, tuliptree, and American beech (among others) with an Eastern red cedar (and sometimes privet) dominated midstory and very little understory.  Over time if cattle are not removed overstory trees will not regenerate, which will negatively impact the future stand.    \r\n\r\nDepending on the concentration of animals and frequency of grazing, trampling can expose soil which may result in erosion.  Storm runoff may increase (Johnson, 1952).  Compaction of the soil surface can damage the fine surface feeder tree roots.  Invasive exotic plants like Japanese honeysuckle and multiflora rose are known to follow grazing disturbance into woodlands once grazers are removed.  Exotic plants including the privets, honeysuckle, and multiflora rose are a problem and will persist and expand if not controlled.",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": [
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/7014.jpg",
                    "caption": "Grazed forest state"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/7015.jpg",
                    "caption": "Eastern red cedar and privet in the mid-story"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/7016.jpg",
                    "caption": "Broomsedge, greenbriar and blackberry understory"
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "type": "plant community",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 5,
            "community": 1,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "Pine spp. - tuliptree/poison ivy ",
                "description": "Pine species will often be first to colonize old fields and will dominate the first overstory of trees (Dale, 1990).  In most of Tennessee, Virginia and shortleaf pines (Pinus echinata) are the dominant species.  Further south in the major land resource area, loblolly pine becomes an important component of this state.  Tuliptree is a commonly noted cohort in this state.  Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) has been noted to increase toward the southern extent of this ecological site.   \r\n\r\nTypically, over the course of time pines will naturally fall out as hardwoods move in, creating oak/pine dominated stands.  Southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis) outbreaks can cause a stand-initiating disturbance in some cases, where aging pine stands are overstocked.  This phase naturally succeeds to mixed hardwoods regardless.     \r\n\r\nIn some cases, old fields have been invaded by exotic plants such as Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica), multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora), and autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata).  Depending on the extent of the invasion, exotic plants can impede a stand from naturally succeeding back to the reference community state.\r\n\r\nAn abundance of poison ivy, a native vine, is often an indication of past disturbance and is commonly found in this phase.",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": [
                {
                    "orientation": "portrait",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6505.jpg",
                    "caption": "Young pine stand"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6977.jpg",
                    "caption": "Older mixed pine-hardwood stand 1 in Georgia"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6978.jpg",
                    "caption": "Older mixed pine-hardwood stand 2 in Georgia"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "landscape",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6501.jpg",
                    "caption": "Older mixed pine-hardwoods in Tennessee"
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "type": "plant community",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 6,
            "community": 1,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "Orchardgrass - tall fescue",
                "description": "The dominance of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata), red clover (Trifolium pratense), and tall fescue (Schedonorus arundinaceus) in this community phase indicate that nutrient levels are adequate, and grazing rotations are long enough to allow pasture plants to recover.  Overstocking and infrequent pasture rotation will allow weedier species to invade, such as nimblewill and rush.",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": [
                {
                    "orientation": "portrait",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6502.jpg",
                    "caption": "Pasture"
                },
                {
                    "orientation": "portrait",
                    "path": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/uploads/med/es/pc/6504.jpg",
                    "caption": "Pasture landscape"
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "type": "plant community",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 6,
            "community": 2,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "Tall fescue - nimblewill",
                "description": "This community phase is transitional to a more degraded phase.  While some desirable pasture plants are still present [tall fescue, white clover (Trifolium repens)], undesirable species such as nimblewill (Muhlenbergia schreberi), rush (Carex spp.), cinquefoil (Potentilla spp.), thistle (Cirsium  spp.) and little barley (Hordeum pusillum) will begin to proliferate.  Heavy grazing pressure may favor weedy species over grass (Rhodes and Phillips, 2012).  Just removing or reducing livestock will not always be enough to restore desirable conditions after a point.  Some type of nutrient improvement may also be needed.",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": []
        },
        {
            "type": "plant community",
            "landUse": 1,
            "state": 6,
            "community": 3,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "Multiflora rose - blackberry spp.",
                "description": "Pastures with a history of overgrazing can be susceptible to invasion by weedy plants, brambles, and small trees if grazing pressure is reduced and nothing further is done to improve the site.  Indicator plants for this phase include blackberry, broomsedge, and multi-flora rose.  Clipping undesirable plants and adding nutrient input can help pastures in this phase recover.  Goats, mowing and herbicide can be useful for clearing unwanted plants.",
                "characteristicsIndicators": "",
                "management": ""
            },
            "images": []
        }
    ]
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

State and transition model transitions

This service returns a JSON file of state and transition model transition data for the specified ecological class.

Availability
                  All catalogs
                
Path
                  /services/models/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/transitions.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
transitions State and transition model transitions
transitions.type Transition type ("conversion", "transition", "restoration pathway", or "community pathway")
transitions.fromLandUse Land use sequence of the origination state
transitions.fromState Ecosystem state sequence of the origination state
transitions.fromCommunity Plant community sequence of the origination state
transitions.toLandUse Land use sequence of the destination state
transitions.toState Ecosystem state sequence of the destination state
transitions.toCommunity Plant community sequence of the destination state
transitions.narratives Transition narratives
transitions.narratives.name Transition name
transitions.narratives.mechanism Transition mechanism narrative
transitions.narratives.constraints Transition recovery constraints narrative
transitions.narratives.conditionality Transition context dependence narrative
transitions.narratives.legend Transition legend narrative
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/models/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/transitions.json
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "transitions": [
        {
            "type": "transition",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 1,
            "fromCommunity": "NA",
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 2,
            "toCommunity": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "T1A",
                "mechanism": "Selective harvesting and high grading multiple times results in degradation of forest stand quality in terms of altered species composition, forest structure, and genetic fitness.  Diameter limit cuts, incorrectly implemented, remove the biggest and best trees and leave those of lowest quality in terms of both timber and ecology.  ",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "transition",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 1,
            "fromCommunity": "NA",
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 3,
            "toCommunity": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "T1B",
                "mechanism": "Large-scale, stand replacing disturbance (natural or human-caused) such as a catastrophic fire, tornado, ice storm or management practices such as clearcutting will result in the majority of the overstory being removed.  This effectively hits the reset button on natural succession and the stand begins to regenerate.  \r\n\r\nAdvanced oak regeneration must be present for oak to be well represented in the next stand. In some cases, competition control will also be necessary.",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "transition",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 1,
            "fromCommunity": "NA",
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 4,
            "toCommunity": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "T1C",
                "mechanism": "Uncontrolled access by livestock and subsequent browsing and selective removal of desirable trees can result in loss of hardwood tree species and invasion by invasive, exotic plants.  In some cases, soil compaction and erosion can become a problem. ",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "transition",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 1,
            "fromCommunity": "NA",
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 6,
            "toCommunity": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "T1D",
                "mechanism": "Forest clearing, herbicide application, and establishment of pasture plants, hay or crops will convert forested stands to a grassland state.  Most pastures in this site are old and were converted many years ago.  ",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "restoration pathway",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 2,
            "fromCommunity": "NA",
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 3,
            "toCommunity": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "R2A",
                "mechanism": "Stand initiating disturbance such as a silvicultural clearcut, tornado, major ice storm or in rare cases, a really hot wildfire, will effectively push the \"reset\" button on succession, allowing superior stock to regain dominance in most cases.  Disturbance loving species like the oaks will typically respond well to this.  However, where seed banks and seed sources are severely depleted, oaks may need to be planted if they are desirable.  Fire has varying effects, depending on the intensity of the fire and stand conditions prior to burning.  Typically, pine species would initially colonize burned areas before other species. ",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "restoration pathway",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 3,
            "fromCommunity": "NA",
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 1,
            "toCommunity": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "R3A",
                "mechanism": "Favor desirable species such as the oaks by treating sprouts and seedlings or saplings of undesirable species (i.e., red maple) with herbicide.  Multiple herbicide treatments may be merited.  Follow-up treatments such as thinning or crop tree release might be needed, depending on management objectives and stand conditions.  ",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "transition",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 4,
            "fromCommunity": "NA",
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 6,
            "toCommunity": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "T4A",
                "mechanism": "Mechanical vegetation control and herbicide application will likely be needed to keep exotic plant species from becoming problematic in newly established pastures.  Seeding with desirable species and fertilizing will be necessary to establish pasture conditions.  Rotational grazing can be used as a management tool to achieve goals. ",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "restoration pathway",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 4,
            "fromCommunity": "NA",
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 1,
            "toCommunity": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "R4A",
                "mechanism": "Remove livestock, control weedy species, and conduct site-based forest management over time.  In most cases, natural succession will occur if invasive plants, including Eastern red cedar, are controlled.  Tree planting with desirable species may often be merited.  In most cases, time and natural processes will heal any soil compaction caused by grazing.   ",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "transition",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 5,
            "fromCommunity": "NA",
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 3,
            "toCommunity": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "T5A",
                "mechanism": "When pine naturally colonizes abandoned agricultural land, the result can be establishment of overstocked pine stands (~40 years).  These stands are attractive to southern pine beetle, which has naturally occurring outbreaks in the Southeast periodically.  Pine beetle kills result in loss of pine in the overstory (Dale 1990) and can be stand replacing in some cases. ",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "restoration pathway",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 5,
            "fromCommunity": "NA",
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 6,
            "toCommunity": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "R5A",
                "mechanism": "Land clearing, seeding, fertilizing, and prescribed grazing on a site by site basis will help push the phase back to pasture.  Control of invasive exotic plant species and poison ivy may be merited.  Control methods typically include herbicide application and mechanical control, such as mowing. ",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "restoration pathway",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 5,
            "fromCommunity": "NA",
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 1,
            "toCommunity": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "R5B",
                "mechanism": "Allowing natural succession to take place over time will most often result in a mixture of oak and pine, which will eventually turn into an oak/hickory mixed stand.  In some cases, exotic plant control (mechanical, chemical, etc.) may be merited.  Where necessary, oak planting or planting some other desirable species could be beneficial.  If planting is done, control of competition through several mechanical and chemical treatments may be necessary for the best results. ",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "transition",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 6,
            "fromCommunity": "NA",
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 5,
            "toCommunity": "NA",
            "narratives": {
                "name": "T6A",
                "mechanism": "Abandonment",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "community pathway",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 1,
            "fromCommunity": 1,
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 1,
            "toCommunity": 2,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "1.1A",
                "mechanism": "Time (typically >100 years) with little or no large-scale disturbance will favor shade tolerant, late successional species including sugar maple, red maple and American beech.  ",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "community pathway",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 1,
            "fromCommunity": 2,
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 1,
            "toCommunity": 1,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "1.2A",
                "mechanism": "Establishment of advanced oak regeneration (natural or planted) is critical to recruiting oak back into the overstory.  If that is desirable, a combination of natural and managed steps will likely be required to favor oak.  Depending on the residual stand, management recommendations might include timber stand improvement, mechanical or chemical treatment of unwanted species, and prescribed fire.  \r\n\r\nConsultation with a professional forester is recommended prior to implementation of any management practice, especially the use of prescribed fire. Arthur et al. (2012) discusses conditions when fire should and should not be used in oak management. ",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "community pathway",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 6,
            "fromCommunity": 1,
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 6,
            "toCommunity": 2,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "1.1A",
                "mechanism": "Overstocked pasture with infrequent rotation.",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "community pathway",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 6,
            "fromCommunity": 2,
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 6,
            "toCommunity": 3,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "2.2A",
                "mechanism": "Overgrazed; low fertility",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "community pathway",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 6,
            "fromCommunity": 2,
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 6,
            "toCommunity": 1,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "2.2B",
                "mechanism": "Rotational grazing with a longer recovery period and higher grazing height; improved fertility. ",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        },
        {
            "type": "community pathway",
            "fromLandUse": 1,
            "fromState": 6,
            "fromCommunity": 3,
            "toLandUse": 1,
            "toState": 6,
            "toCommunity": 2,
            "narratives": {
                "name": "3.3A",
                "mechanism": "Clipping pasture with nutrient improvement or controlled grazing.  ",
                "constraints": "",
                "conditionality": "",
                "legend": ""
            }
        }
    ]
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Supporting information description

This service returns a JSON file of supporting information data for the specified ecological class. Data for all description sections can be obtained using the Class Description web service.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/descriptions/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/supporting-information.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
supportingInformation Supporting information description data
supportingInformation.narratives Supporting information narratives
supportingInformation.narratives.dataReferences Data references narrative
supportingInformation.narratives.otherReferences Other references narrative
supportingInformation.narratives.acknowledgments Acknowledgments narrative
supportingInformation.localityList Ecological class type localities and associated data
supportingInformation.localityList.state Type locality state
supportingInformation.localityList.county Type locality county
supportingInformation.localityList.plss Type locality PLSS description
supportingInformation.localityList.datum Type locality UTM datum
supportingInformation.localityList.zone Type locality UTM zone
supportingInformation.localityList.northing Type locality UTM northing
supportingInformation.localityList.easting Type locality UTM easting
supportingInformation.localityList.latitude Type locality latitude in degrees, minutes, seconds
supportingInformation.localityList.longitude Type locality longitude in degrees, minutes, seconds
supportingInformation.localityList.latitudeDecimal Type locality latitude in decimal degrees
supportingInformation.localityList.longitudeDecimal Type locality longitude in decimal degrees
supportingInformation.localityList.description Type locality legal description
supportingInformation.citations Literature citations
supportingInformation.contributors Contributors to the ecological class description
supportingInformation.approval Publication approval details
supportingInformation.approval.approver Individul performing the approval
supportingInformation.approval.publicationDate Date of most recent publication
supportingInformation.certifications Certifications
supportingInformation.certifications.certifier Individul performing the certification
supportingInformation.certifications.organization Organization
supportingInformation.certifications.certificationDate Date of certification
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/supporting-information.json
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "supportingInformation": {
        "narratives": {
            "dataReferences": "30 tier 1-2 plots; 1 pasture plot (NRI); 7 tier 3 reference plots; 10 site index plots.  ",
            "otherReferences": "Alexander, Heather D. and M.A. Arthur. 2010. Implications of a predicted shift from upland oaks to red maple on forest hydrology and nutrient availability. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 40: 716-726.\r\n\r\nApsley, David and S. Gehert.  2006.  Enhancing food (mast) production for woodland wildlife in Ohio.  Extension Fact Sheet F-60-06, Ohio State University Extension, School of Natural Resources, Columbus, OH.\r\n\r\nArthur, Mary A., H.D. Alexander, D.C. Dey, C.J. Schweitzer, and D.L. Loftis.  2012.  Refining the oak-fire hypothesis for management of oak-dominated forests of the eastern United States. Journal of Forestry 110: 257-266.\r\n\r\nBraun, E. Lucy.  1947.  Development of the Deciduous Forests of Eastern North America. Ecological Monographs 17(2):  211 - 219.\r\n\r\nBrose, Patrick H., D.C. Dey, R.J. Phillips, and T.A. Waldrop.  2013.  A meta-analysis of the fire-oak hypothesis:  Does prescribed burning promote oak reproduction in eastern North America?  Forest Science 59(3):  322 – 334. \r\n\r\nBuol, Stan W., F.D. Hole, R.J. McCracken, R.J. Southard.  1997.  Soil Genesis and Classification (4th ed.). Ames, Iowa: Iowa State University Press. Pp. 353 - 359. \r\n\r\nCarmean, Willard H.  1957.  The structure of forest soils.  The Ohio Journal of Science 57(3):  165-168.\r\n\r\nCase, Earl C.  1925.  The valley of east Tennessee: The adjustment of industry to natural environment.  Bulletin 36.  Division of Geology, Nashville, Tennessee.\r\n\r\nChapman, Jefferson, P.A. Delcourt, P.A. Cridlebaugh, A.B. Shea, and H.R. Delcourt.  1982.   Man-land interaction: 10,000 years of American Indian impact on native ecosystems in the lower little Tennessee River valley, eastern Tennessee.  Southeastern Archaeology 1:  115–121.\r\n\r\nClark, Stacy L. and C.J. Schweitzer.  2013.  Red maple (Acer rubrum) response to prescribed burning on the William B. Bankhead National Forest, Alabama.  In: Guldin, James M., ed. 2013. Proceedings of the 15th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-175. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 271-276. \r\n\r\nCondley, Brandon C. 1984.  The ridge top chestnut oak forest community of the Ridge and Valley Physiographic Province and adjacent areas. M.S. Thesis.  The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.\r\n\r\nDale, Virginia H., L.K. Mann, R.J. Olson, D.W. Johnson, and K.C. Dearstone.  1990.  The long-term influence of past land use on the Walker Branch forest.  Landscape Ecology 4(4):  211-224.\r\n\r\nDelcourt, Paul. A. and H.R. Delcourt.  1998.  The influence of prehistoric human-set fires on oak-chestnut forests in the southern Appalachians. Castanea 63:  337–345.\r\n\r\nDeSelm, Hal. R. 1984.  Potential national natural landmarks of the Appalachian ranges natural region: Ecological report. University of Tennessee, Knoxville.\r\n\r\nDickson, James G. Wildlife and upland oak forests.  In: Spetich, Martin A., ed. 2004.  Upland oak ecology symposium:  history, current conditions, and sustainability.  Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-73. Asheville, NC:  U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 311 p.\r\n\r\nEvans, Richard M. 1992.  Soil and water conservation plan for:  The University of Tennessee Forestry Experiment Station.  \r\n\r\nGreen, Jonathan D., W.W. Witt, and J.R. Martin.  2006.  Weed management in grass pastures, hayfields, and other farmstead sites.  University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service publication AGR-172. \r\n\r\nGreenberg, Catherine H., R.W. Perry, C.A. Harper, D.J. Levey, J.M. McCord.  2011.  The role of recently disturbed upland hardwood forest as high quality food patches. In: Sustaining Young Forest Communities: Ecology and management of early successional habitats in the Central Hardwood Region, USA. Managing Forest Ecosystems.  pp. 121–141.\r\n\r\nHart, Justin L., S.L. van de Gevel, and H.D. Grissino-Mayer. 2008.  Forest dynamics in a natural area of the southern Ridge and Valley, Tennessee. Natural Areas Journal 28:  275–289.\r\n\r\nHart, Justin L. and J.A. Kupfer.  2011.  Sapling richness and composition in canopy gaps of a southern Appalachian mixed Quercus forest.  Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society 138(2):  207-219.\r\n\r\nHart, Justin L., S.L. Clark, S.J. Torreano, and M.L. Buchanan.  2012.  Composition, structure, and dendroecology of an old-growth Quercus forest on the tablelands of the Cumberland Plateau, USA.  Forest Ecology and Management 266:  11-24.  \r\n\r\nHart, Justin L., M.L. Buchanan, S.L. Clark., and S.J. Torreano.  2012.  Canopy accession strategies and climate-growth relationships in Acer rubrum.  Forest Ecology and Management 282:  124-132. \r\n\r\nJohnson, E.A.  1952.  Effect of farm woodland grazing on watershed values in the southern Appalachian Mountains.  Journal of Forestry 50(2):  109 – 113. \r\n\r\nKeever, C. 1953. Present composition of some stands of the former oak-chestnut forest in the southern Blue Ridge Mountains. Ecology. 34: 44-54.\r\n\r\nLoftis, David L. 2004.  Upland oak regeneration and management.  In:  Proceedings of the Upland oak ecology symposium.  USDA Forest Service, Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-73, Southern Research Station, Asheville, NC. pp 163 - 167.\r\n\r\nLorimer, Craig G.  2001.  Historical and ecological roles of disturbance in Eastern North American forests: 9,000 years of change. Wildlife Society Bulletin 29:  425–439.\r\n\r\nMartin, Alexander C., H.C. Zim, and A.L. Nelson.  1961.  American wildlife and plants:  A guide to wildlife food habits.  Dover, New York, New York, USA.\r\n\r\nMartin, William H.  1971.  Forest communities of the dissected uplands in the Great Valley of east Tennessee and their relationship to soil and topographic properties.  PhD Dissertation.  The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.\r\n\r\nMartin, William H.  1989.  Forest patterns in the Great Valley of Tennessee.  Journal of the Tennessee Academy of Science 64(3):  137 – 143.\r\n\r\nMcEwan, Ryan W., J.M. Dyer, and N. Pederson.  2011.  Multiple interacting ecosystem drivers:  Toward an encompassing hypothesis of oak forest dynamics across eastern North America.  Ecography 34:  244-256. \r\n\r\nMcGrath, J.C., and W. K. Clatterbuck.  2013. Assessing anthropogenic and natural disturbances: Vegetational response to similarly aged clearcut and tornado disturbances in an East Tennessee oak-hickory forest.  In:  Proceedings of 15th Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference, Hot Springs, AR, November 18-20, 2009. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-175. Asheville, NC: USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 81-90.\r\n\r\nMcShea, William J., W.M. Healy, P. Devers, T. Fearer, F.H. Koch, D. Stauffer, and J. Waldon.  2007.  Forestry matters:  Decline of oaks will impact wildlife in hardwood forests.  Journal of Wildlife Management 71(5):  1717-1728.\r\n\r\nNelson, Thomas C.  1955.  Chestnut replacement in the southern highlands.  Ecology 36(2):  352-353.\r\n\r\nNowacki, Gregory J. and M.D. Abrams.  2008. The demise of fire and ‘‘mesophication’’ of forests in the eastern United States. BioScience 58:  123–138.\r\n\r\nOlson, David F. , Jr. 1959. Site index curves for upland oak in the southeast. USDA, Forest Service. Southeastern Forest Experiment Station Research Note 125.\r\n\r\nPrice, Katie, C.R. Jackson, and A.J. Parker.  2010.  Variation of surficial soil hydraulic properties across land uses in the southern Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina, USA.  Journal of Hydrology 383:  256-268.\r\n\r\nRhodes, G. Neil Jr., and W.P. Phillips Jr.  2012.  PB1801 Weed Management in Pastures and Hay Crops, http://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_agexcrop/157. \r\n\r\nSchlaegel, Bryce E., D.L. Kulow, and R.N. Baughman.  1969.  Empirical yield tables for West Virginia yellow poplar.  West Virginia University Agriculture Experiment Station Bulletin 574T.\r\n\r\nSmith, David W.  1968.  Vegetational changes in a five county area of east Tennessee during secondary succession.  M.S. Thesis.  The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.\r\n \r\nSmith, David W. 1995. The southern Appalachian hardwood region. Regional Silviculture of the United States. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. New York, NY, 643, 173-225.\r\n\r\nSteckel, Larry and N. Rhodes.  2007.  Perilla mint.  University of Tennessee Extension Service publication W135.\r\n\r\nStephenson, Steven L., H.S. Adams, and M.L. Lipford. 1991. The present distribution of American chestnut in the upland forest communities of Virginia. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 118:24-32.\r\n\r\nSwank, Wayne T., J.M. Vose, and K.J. Elliott.  2001. Long-term hydrologic and water quality responses following commercial clearcutting of mixed hardwoods on a southern Appalachian catchment.  Forest Ecology and Management 143:  163 - 178.\r\n\r\nTennessee Forest Products Bulletin.  July - September, 2013.  Volume 39(3).  \r\n\r\nThor, Eyvind and D.D. Summers.  1971.  Changes in forest composition on Big Ridge Natural Study Area, Union County, Tennessee. Castanea 36:  114-122.\r\n\r\nThornthwaite, Charles W.  1948.  An approach toward a rational classification of climate.  Geographical Review 38(1):  55-94.\r\n\r\nUnited States Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service.  1992.  Hardwood forest grazing.  Woodland Fact Sheet No. 7. Columbia, Missouri. \r\n\r\nWilliams, Samuel C.  1928.  Early travels in the Tennessee country, 1540-1800: With introductions, annotations and index. The Watauga Press, Johnson City, Tennessee.\r\n",
            "acknowledgments": ""
        },
        "localityList": [],
        "inventoryReferences": [],
        "citations": [],
        "contributors": [
            "Belinda Esham"
        ],
        "approval": {
            "approver": "",
            "publicationDate": ""
        },
        "certifications": []
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Water features description

This service returns a JSON file of water features data for the specified ecological class. Data for all description sections can be obtained using the Class Description web service.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/descriptions/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/water-features.json
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
Response attributes
Attribute Description
metadata Request metadata
metadata.source URL of the request
metadata.date Date of the request
waterFeatures Water features description data
waterFeatures.narratives Water features narratives
waterFeatures.narratives.waterFeatures Water features narrative
waterFeatures.narratives.wetlandDescription Wetland description narrative
waterFeatures.images Water features diagrams
waterFeatures.images.path Image path
waterFeatures.images.orientation Image orientation
waterFeatures.images.caption Image caption
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/042X/R042XB010NM/water-features.json
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
{
    "metadata": {
        "source": "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu",
        "date": "2020-02-11"
    },
    "waterFeatures": {
        "narratives": {
            "waterFeatures": "This site is not influenced by water from wetland or stream.",
            "wetlandDescription": ""
        },
        "images": []
    }
}                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
{
    "error": {
        "code": 404,
        "message": "Not Found"
    }
}                    
                  
                

Tab-delimited text

The following web services return data in tab-delimited text format. Click on a service to expand its details.

Class list

This service returns a tab-delimited file of ecological classes for the specified catalog and geographic unit. The list can be filtered by adding one or more optional query parameter to the service call.

Availability
                  All catalogs
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/class-list.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
precipitation query optional Colon-delimited tuple of mimimum and maximum mean annual precipitation in millimeters
frostFreeDays query optional Colon-delimited tuple of mimimum and maximum frost free days
elevation query optional Colon-delimited tuple of mimimum and maximum elevation in meters
slope query optional Colon-delimited tuple of mimimum and maximum percent slope
landform query optional Pipe-delimited list of landform types (see USDA Soil Survey documentation for valid options)
parentMaterialOrigin query optional Pipe-delimited list of parent material origin types (see USDA Soil Survey documentation for valid options)
parentMaterialKind query optional Pipe-delimited list of parent material kind types (see USDA Soil Survey documentation for valid options)
surfaceTexture query optional Pipe-delimited list of surface texture types (see USDA Soil Survey documentation for valid options)
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Ecological class name Ecological class name
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/class-list.txt
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/class-list.txt?slope=15:30&landform=mountain slope|ridge
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	"Ecological site name"
 
039X	F039XA001NM	F039XA001NM	"Pseudotsuga menziesii-Populus tremuloides/Quercus gambelii-Robinia neomexicana/Poa fendleriana"
 
039X	F039XA002NM	F039XA002NM	"Pinus ponderosa-Pseudotsuga menziesii/Quercus gambelii-Cercocarpus montanus/Poa fendleriana"
 
039X	F039XA003NM	F039XA003NM	"Pinus edulis-Juniperus scopulorum/Quercus gambelii/Bouteloua gracilis"
 
039X	F039XA004NM	F039XA004NM	"Pinus ponderosa-Juniperus deppeana/Quercus gambelii/Festuca arizonica"
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Class list (all geographic units)

This service returns a tab-delimited file of ecological classes for the specified catalog.

Availability
                  All catalogs
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/class-list.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Ecological class name Ecological class name
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/class-list.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	"Ecological site name"
 
002X	F002XN901WA	F002XN901WA	"Douglas-fir - Pacific madrone/oceanspray/rattlesnake plantain "
 
002X	F002XN902WA	F002XN902WA	"Western hemlock - Douglas-fir/Cascade Oregongrape"
 
002X	F002XN903WA	F002XN903WA	"Western redcedar - Douglas-fir/salal/swordfern"
 
002X	F002XN904WA	F002XN904WA	"Sitka spruce - red alder/salmonberry/field horsetail"
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Climatic features

This service returns a tab-delimited file of ecological class climatic features data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/climatic-features.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Ecological class name Ecological class name
Property Property name
Measurement unit Measurement unit
Representative low Representative low (values are expected to be above this limit about 80% of the time)
Representative high Representative high (values are expected to be below this limit about 80% of the time)
Range low Range low (values are expected to be above this limit about 95% of the time)
Range high Range high (values are expected to be below this limit about 95% of the time)
Average Average value
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/climatic-features.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	Property	"Measurement unit"	"Representative low"	"Representative high"	"Range low"	"Range high"	Average
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"mean annual precipitation"						18
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"frost free days"						274
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"freeze free days"						290
 
039X	F039XA102AZ	F039XA102AZ	"mean annual precipitation"						22
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Geographic unit list

This service returns a tab-delimited file of geographic units for the specified catalog. The list can be filtered by adding one or more optional query parameter to the service call.

Availability
                  All catalogs
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/geo-unit-list.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
administrativeUnit query optional Administrative unit name. The list will include only those geographic units intersecting the administrative unit.
availability query optional Pipe-delimited list of availability types. Specify "class" to limit the list to only those geographic units having at least one published ecological class description. Specify "key" to limit the list to only those geographic units having at least one published ecological class key.
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Geographic unit name Geographic unit name
Ecological class count Published ecological class count
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/geo-unit-list.txt
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/geo-unit-list.txt?state=ID
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"MLRA name"	"Ecological site count"
 
001X	"Northern Pacific Coast Range, Foothills, and Valleys"	0
 
002X	"Willamette and Puget Sound Valleys"	11
 
003X	"Olympic and Cascade Mountains"	29
 
004A	"Sitka Spruce Belt"	0
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Landforms

This service returns a tab-delimited file of ecological class landform data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/landforms.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Ecological class name Ecological class name
Sequence Sequence
Landscape Landscape
Landform Landform
Microfeature Microfeature
Modifiers Modifiers
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/landforms.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	Sequence	Landscape	Landform	Microfeature	Modifiers
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	1		"mountain slope"		
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	2		ridge		
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	3		hill		
 
039X	F039XA110AZ	F039XA110AZ	1		hill		
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Physiographic properties (interval)

This service returns a tab-delimited file of ecological class physiographic interval property data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/physiographic-interval-properties.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Ecological class name Ecological class name
Property Property name
Measurement unit Measurement unit
Representative low Representative low (values are expected to be above this limit about 80% of the time)
Representative high Representative high (values are expected to be below this limit about 80% of the time)
Range low Range low (values are expected to be above this limit about 95% of the time)
Range high Range high (values are expected to be below this limit about 95% of the time)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/physiographic-interval-properties.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	Property	"Measurement unit"	"Representative low"	"Representative high"	"Range low"	"Range high"
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	elevation	ft	6500.00	10250.00		
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	slope	%	5.00	60.00		
 
039X	F039XA110AZ	F039XA110AZ	elevation	ft	6000.00	8410.00		
 
039X	F039XA110AZ	F039XA110AZ	slope	%	25.00	70.00		
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Physiographic properties (nominal)

This service returns a tab-delimited file of ecological class physiographic nominal property data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/physiographic-nominal-properties.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Ecological class name Ecological class name
Property Property name
Property value Property value
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/physiographic-nominal-properties.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	Property	"Property value"
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	aspect	north
 
039X	F039XA110AZ	F039XA110AZ	aspect	"not applicable"
 
039X	F039XA111AZ	F039XA111AZ	aspect	"not applicable"
 
039X	F039XA133AZ	F039XA133AZ	aspect	"not applicable"
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Physiographic properties (ordinal)

This service returns a tab-delimited file of ecological class physiographic ordinal property data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/physiographic-ordinal-properties.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Ecological class name Ecological class name
Property Property name
Representative low Representative low (values are expected to be above this limit about 80% of the time)
Representative high Representative high (values are expected to be below this limit about 80% of the time)
Range low Range low (values are expected to be above this limit about 95% of the time)
Range high Range high (values are expected to be below this limit about 95% of the time)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/physiographic-ordinal-properties.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	Property	"Representative low"	"Representative high"	"Range low"	"Range high"
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"flooding frequency"	none	none		
 
039X	F039XA111AZ	F039XA111AZ	"flooding frequency"	none			
 
039X	F039XB101NM	F039XB101NM	"flooding frequency"	none	none		
 
039X	F039XB103NM	F039XB103NM	"flooding duration"	none	rare		
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Plant community annual production

This service returns a tab-delimited file of plant community annual production data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/annual-production.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Land use Land use sequence
Ecosystem state Ecosystem state sequence
Plant community Plant community sequence
Plant type Plant type
Plant symbol Plant species symbol
Common name Plant species common name
Scientific name Plant species scientific name
Production low Production low value (lb/acre)
Production RV Production representative value (lb/acre)
Production high Production high value (lb/acre)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/annual-production.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	"Land use"	"Ecosystem state"	"Plant community"	"Plant type"	"Production low"	"Production RV"	"Production high"
 
039X	F039XA111AZ	F039XA111AZ	1	1	1	tree	3	10	15
 
039X	F039XA111AZ	F039XA111AZ	1	1	1	shrub/vine	3	10	15
 
039X	F039XA111AZ	F039XA111AZ	1	1	1	grass/grasslike	225	240	255
 
039X	F039XA111AZ	F039XA111AZ	1	1	1	forb	30	40	45
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Plant community forest overstory composition

This service returns a tab-delimited file of plant community forest overstory composition data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/forest-overstory.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Land use Land use sequence
Ecosystem state Ecosystem state sequence
Plant community Plant community sequence
Plant type Plant type
Plant symbol Plant species symbol
Common name Plant species common name
Scientific name Plant species scientific name
Canopy cover low Canopy cover low value (%)
Canopy cover high Canopy cover high value (%)
Canopy bottom height Canopy bottom height (ft)
Canopy top height Canopy top height (ft)
Tree diameter low Tree diameter low value (in)
Tree diameter high Tree diameter high value (in)
Tree basal area low Tree basal area low value (square ft/acre)
Tree basal area high Tree basal area high value (square ft/acre)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/forest-overstory.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	"Land use"	"Ecosystem state"	"Plant community"	"Plant type"	"Plant symbol"	"Common name"	"Scientific name"	"Canopy cover low"	"Canopy cover high"	"Canopy bottom height"	"Canopy top height"	"Tree diameter low"	"Tree diameter high"	"Tree basal area low"	"Tree basal area high"
 
039X	F039XB103NM	F039XB103NM	1	1	1	tree	JUDE2	"alligator juniper"	"Juniperus deppeana"	15.0	20.0						
 
039X	F039XB103NM	F039XB103NM	1	1	1	tree	JUDE2	"alligator juniper"	"Juniperus deppeana"	15.0	20.0						
 
039X	F039XB103NM	F039XB103NM	1	1	1	tree	PIED	"twoneedle pinyon"	"Pinus edulis"	5.0	10.0						
 
039X	F039XB103NM	F039XB103NM	1	1	1	tree	PIPO	"ponderosa pine"	"Pinus ponderosa"	20.0	30.0						
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Plant community forest understory composition

This service returns a tab-delimited file of plant community forest understory composition data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/forest-understory.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Land use Land use sequence
Ecosystem state Ecosystem state sequence
Plant community Plant community sequence
Plant type Plant type
Plant symbol Plant species symbol
Common name Plant species common name
Scientific name Plant species scientific name
Canopy cover low Canopy cover low value (%)
Canopy cover high Canopy cover high value (%)
Canopy bottom height Canopy bottom height (ft)
Canopy top height Canopy top height (ft)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/forest-understory.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	"Land use"	"Ecosystem state"	"Plant community"	"Plant type"	"Plant symbol"	"Common name"	"Scientific name"	"Canopy cover low"	"Canopy cover high"	"Canopy bottom height"	"Canopy top height"
 
039X	F039XB103NM	F039XB103NM	1	1	1	tree	JUDE2	"alligator juniper"	"Juniperus deppeana"	15.0	20.0		
 
039X	F039XB103NM	F039XB103NM	1	1	1	tree	JUDE2	"alligator juniper"	"Juniperus deppeana"	15.0	20.0		
 
039X	F039XB103NM	F039XB103NM	1	1	1	tree	PIED	"twoneedle pinyon"	"Pinus edulis"	5.0	10.0		
 
039X	F039XB103NM	F039XB103NM	1	1	1	tree	PIPO	"ponderosa pine"	"Pinus ponderosa"	20.0	30.0		
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Plant community rangeland plant composition

This service returns a tab-delimited file of rangeland plant species composition data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/rangeland-plant-composition.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Land use Land use sequence
Ecosystem state Ecosystem state sequence
Plant community Plant community sequence
Group number Plant group number
Group label Plant group label
Custom group number Plant custom group number
Plant type Plant type
Plant symbol Plant species symbol
Common name Plant species common name
Scientific name Plant species scientific name
Production low Production low value (lb/acre)
Production high Production high value (lb/acre)
Foliar cover low Foliar cover low value (%)
Foliar cover high Foliar cover high value (%)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/rangeland-plant-composition.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	"Land use"	"Ecosystem state"	"Plant community"	"Group number"	"Group label"	"Custom group number"	"Plant type"	"Plant symbol"	"Common name"	"Scientific name"	"Production low"	"Production high"	"Foliar cover low"	"Foliar cover high"
 
039X	F039XA111AZ	F039XA111AZ	1	1	1	1		1	grass/grasslike	BLTR	"pine dropseed"	"Blepharoneuron tricholepis"	30	45		
 
039X	F039XA111AZ	F039XA111AZ	1	1	1	2		2	grass/grasslike	MUMO	"mountain muhly"	"Muhlenbergia montana"	30	45		
 
039X	F039XA111AZ	F039XA111AZ	1	1	1	3		3	grass/grasslike	FEAR2	"Arizona fescue"	"Festuca arizonica"	15	30		
 
039X	F039XA111AZ	F039XA111AZ	1	1	1	4		4	grass/grasslike	MUWR	"spike muhly"	"Muhlenbergia wrightii"	0	3		
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Plant community soil surface cover

This service returns a tab-delimited file of plant soil surface cover composition data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/soil-surface-cover.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Land use Land use sequence
Ecosystem state Ecosystem state sequence
Plant community Plant community sequence
Cover type Cover type
Cover low Cover low value (%)
Cover high Cover high value (%)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/soil-surface-cover.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	"Land use"	"Ecosystem state"	"Plant community"	"Cover type"	"Cover low"	"Cover high"
 
039X	R039XA019NM	R039XA019NM	1	1	1	litter	10.000	10.000
 
039X	R039XA019NM	R039XA019NM	1	1	1	"surface fragments > 0.25"" and <= 3"""	15.000	15.000
 
039X	R039XA019NM	R039XA019NM	1	1	1	"surface fragments > 3"""	10.000	10.000
 
039X	R039XA019NM	R039XA019NM	1	1	1	"bare ground"	42.000	42.000
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Soil parent material

This service returns a tab-delimited file of ecological class soil parent material data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/soil-parent-material.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Ecological class name Ecological class name
Sequence Sequence
Landscape Landscape
Landform Landform
Microfeature Microfeature
Modifiers Modifiers
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/soil-parent-material.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	Sequence	Kind	Origin
 
039X	F039XA133AZ	F039XA133AZ	1	residuum	basalt
 
039X	F039XA135AZ	F039XA135AZ	1	colluvium	basalt
 
039X	F039XB103NM	F039XB103NM	1	alluvium	"shale, unspecified"
 
039X	F039XB103NM	F039XB103NM	2	residuum	andesite
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Soil properties (interval)

This service returns a tab-delimited file of ecological class soil interval property data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/soil-interval-properties.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Ecological class name Ecological class name
Property Property name
Measurement unit Measurement unit
Representative low Representative low (values are expected to be above this limit about 80% of the time)
Representative high Representative high (values are expected to be below this limit about 80% of the time)
Range low Range low (values are expected to be above this limit about 95% of the time)
Range high Range high (values are expected to be below this limit about 95% of the time)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/soil-interval-properties.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	Property	"Measurement unit"	"Representative low"	"Representative high"	"Range low"	"Range high"
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"soil depth"	in	5.00	60.00		
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"surface fragment cover <=3"""	%	25.00	35.00		
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"surface fragment cover >3"""	%	5.00	30.00		
 
039X	F039XA110AZ	F039XA110AZ	"soil depth"	in	3.00	8.00		
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Soil properties (nominal)

This service returns a tab-delimited file of ecological class soil nominal property data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/soil-nominal-properties.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Ecological class name Ecological class name
Property Property name
Property value Property value
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/soil-nominal-properties.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	Property	"Property value"
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"family particle size"	loamy
 
039X	F039XA111AZ	F039XA111AZ	"family particle size"	loamy
 
039X	F039XA124AZ	F039XA124AZ	"family particle size"	loamy
 
039X	F039XA132AZ	F039XA132AZ	"family particle size"	loamy
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Soil properties (ordinal)

This service returns a tab-delimited file of ecological class soil ordinal property data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/soil-ordinal-properties.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Ecological class name Ecological class name
Property Property name
Representative low Representative low (values are expected to be above this limit about 80% of the time)
Representative high Representative high (values are expected to be below this limit about 80% of the time)
Range low Range low (values are expected to be above this limit about 95% of the time)
Range high Range high (values are expected to be below this limit about 95% of the time)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/soil-ordinal-properties.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	Property	"Representative low"	"Representative high"	"Range low"	"Range high"
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"drainage class"	slow	moderate		
 
039X	F039XA110AZ	F039XA110AZ	"drainage class"	"moderately slow"	moderate		
 
039X	F039XA111AZ	F039XA111AZ	"drainage class"	slow			
 
039X	F039XA124AZ	F039XA124AZ	"drainage class"	moderate	"moderately rapid"		
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Soil properties (profile)

This service returns a tab-delimited file of ecological class soil profile property data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/soil-profile-properties.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Ecological class name Ecological class name
Property Property name
Measurement unit Measurement unit
Top depth Top depth
Bottom depth Bottom depth
Representative low Representative low (values are expected to be above this limit about 80% of the time)
Representative high Representative high (values are expected to be below this limit about 80% of the time)
Range low Range low (values are expected to be above this limit about 95% of the time)
Range high Range high (values are expected to be below this limit about 95% of the time)
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/soil-profile-properties.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	Property	"Measurement unit"	"Top depth"	"Bottom depth"	"Representative low"	"Representative high"	"Range low"	"Range high"
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"available water capacity"	in	.00	40.00	.05	.14		
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"electrical conductivity"	mmhos/cm	.00	40.00	1.00	2.00		
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"subsurface fragment volume <=3"""	%			15.00	20.00		
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"subsurface fragment volume >3"""	%			40.00	45.00		
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

Soil surface textures

This service returns a tab-delimited file of ecological class soil surface texture data for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  Ecological Site Descriptions catalog only
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/soil-surface-textures.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Ecological class name Ecological class name
Sequence Sequence
Texture class Texture class
Modifier 1 Modifier 1
Modifier 2 Modifier 2
Modifier 3 Modifier 3
Term in lieu Term in lieu
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/soil-surface-textures.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	Sequence	"Texture class"	"Modifier 1"	"Modifier 2"	"Modifier 3"	"Term in lieu"
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	1	loam	"extremely cobbly"			
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	2	"sandy loam"	stony			
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	3		gravelly			
 
039X	F039XA110AZ	F039XA110AZ	1	loam	"very stony"			
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

State and transition model state narratives

This service returns a tab-delimited file of state and transition model state narratives for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  All catalogs
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/model-state-narratives.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
State type State type
Land use Land use sequence
Ecosystem state Ecosystem state sequence
Plant community Plant community sequence
Name State name
Description State description narrative
Characteristics and indicators State characteristics and indicators narrative
Management State management narrative
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/model-state-narratives.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	"State type"	"Land use"	"Ecosystem state"	"Plant community"	Name	Description	"Characteristics and indicators"	Management
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"ecosystem state"	1	1	NA	"Plant Community 1 - Reference Community"			
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"ecosystem state"	1	2	NA	"Plant Community 2"			
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"ecosystem state"	1	3	NA	"Plant Community 3"			
 
039X	F039XA007NM	F039XA007NM	"ecosystem state"	1	4	NA	"Plant Community 4"			
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

State and transition model transition narratives

This service returns a tab-delimited file of state and transition model transition narratives for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  All catalogs
                
Path
                  /services/downloads/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/model-transition-narratives.txt
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
Response columns
Column Description
Geographic unit symbol Geographic unit symbol
Ecological class ID Ecological class ID
Ecological class legacy ID Ecological class legacy ID
Transition type Transition type
From land use From land use sequence
From ecosystem state From ecosystem state sequence
From plant community From plant community sequence
To land use To land use sequence
To ecosystem state To ecosystem state sequence
To plant community To plant community sequence
Name Transition name
Mechanism Transition mechanism narrative
Recovery constraints Transition recovery constraints narrative
Context dependence Transition context dependence narrative
Legend Transition legend narrative
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/model-transition-narratives.txt
                
Example response (code 200)
                  
                    
  
 
"# source: https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu"
 
"# date: 2020-02-11"
 
MLRA	"Ecological site ID"	"Ecological site legacy ID"	"Transition type"	"From land use"	"From ecosystem state"	"From plant community"	"To land use"	"To ecosystem state"	"To plant community"	Name	Mechanism	"Recovery constraints"	"Context dependence"	Legend
 
039X	F039XA102AZ	F039XA102AZ	transition	1	1	NA	1	2	NA	T1	"A severe crown burning fire takes out the trees and increases the re-sprouting of certain basal sprouting shrubs. Ecological processes that determine a return to state one are not currently understood."			
 
039X	F039XA110AZ	F039XA110AZ	transition	1	1	NA	1	2	NA	T1	"Disturbance such as sever fire will cause a thick stand of immature alligator juniper."			
 
039X	F039XA110AZ	F039XA110AZ	"restoration pathway"	1	2	NA	1	1	NA	R1	"A setback to alligator juniper along with re-colonization of ponderosa pine."			
 
039X	F039XA111AZ	F039XA111AZ	transition	1	1	NA	1	2	NA	Wildfire	"Severe, crown burning fire. At this point the ecological drivers to return the site to reference conditions are unknown."			
                    
                  
                
Example error response (code 404)
                  
                    
# error: 404
# message: Not Found

Content Unavailable
=======================

The URL may contain errors or the requested content may not exist.
                    
                  
                

PDF

The following web services return documents in PDF format. Click on a service to expand its details.

Class description

This service returns a PDF file of the specified ecological class description.

Availability
                  All catalogs
                
Path
                  /services/descriptions/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{ecoclass}/{section}.pdf
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
ecoclass path required Ecological class ID
section path optional Description section to return ("general-information", "physiographic-features", "climatic-features", "water-features", "soil-features", "ecological-dynamics", "interpretations", "supporting-information", "reference-sheet"). The full description will be returned if not specified.
sections query optional Pipe-delimited list of sections to include. See the section path parameter description for available options. This parameter is ignored if the section path parameter is specified.
fontName query optional Font type ("arial" or "times"). Default is "arial".
fontSize query optional Font size ("default", "smaller,1", "larger,1", "larger,2")
images query optional Specify "true" if images will be included, "false" otherwise. Default is "true".
measurementSystem query optional Measurement system ("usc" or "metric"). Default is "usc".
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN.pdf
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/reference-sheet.pdf?fontName=times&fontSize=larger,1
                

Class key

This service returns a PDF file of ecological class keys for the specified catalog and geographic unit.

Availability
                  All catalogs
                
Path
                  /services/keys/{catalog}/{geoUnit}/{key}.pdf
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
key path optional Key number. All keys will be returned if not specified.
fontName query optional Font type ("arial" or "times"). Default is "arial".
fontSize query optional Font size ("default", "smaller,1", "larger,1", "larger,2")
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/042X.pdf
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/042X/1.pdf?fontName=times&fontSize=larger,1
                

Geographic unit description

This service returns a PDF file of the specified geographic unit description.

Availability
                  All catalogs
                
Path
                  /services/descriptions/{catalog}/{geoUnit}.pdf
                
Request parameters
Parameter Type Status Description
catalog path required Catalog ID
geoUnit path required Geographic unit ID
section path optional Description section to return ("general-information"). The full description will be returned if not specified.
sections query optional Pipe-delimited list of sections to include. See the section path parameter description for available options. This parameter is ignored if the section path parameter is specified.
fontName query optional Font type ("arial" or "times"). Default is "arial".
fontSize query optional Font size ("default", "smaller,1", "larger,1", "larger,2")
Example request
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/042X.pdf
                
Example request (with optional parameters)
                  https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/042X/general-information.pdf?fontName=times&fontSize=larger,1
                

Tutorial 1. Understanding EDIT data

EDIT contains data associated with various geographic areas and ecosystem types. To help users locate and apply relevant information, EDIT is structured around a hierarchy of geographic and conceptual components. The key components of this hierarchy are described below, in order from least to most specific. Each description is followed by an example web service call highlighting the component under consideration.

EDIT hierarchy Figure 1. EDIT organizational hierarchy

Data catalog

A data catalog serves as the most basic structure for organizing data in EDIT. Nearly all information contributed to EDIT can be traced back to a single data catalog. Each data catalog is associated with a single geographic dataset and a single ecological classification.

Enter the following URL into a web browser to retrieve data in JSON format for the Thermic Cherty Dolomite Upland Oak-Hickory Forest ecological site of Major Land Resource Area 128X, Southern Appalachian Ridges and Valleys. The data catalog is specified in the URL by its symbol, "esd", indicating the Ecological Site Descriptions data catalog.

              
# Copy and paste this URL into a web browser.
# A JSON file will be downloaded.
https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN.json
              
            

Geographic data set

A geographic data set is a collection of geographic units that can be drawn on a map and together define the geographic extent of a data catalog. All of the geographic units within a geographic data set are typically delineated according to a particular set of rules, governing such attributes as geographic unit size and intended viewing scale. Geographic data sets are typically not referenced in web page URLs or web service calls, since each data catalog is always associated with a single geographic data set.

Enter the following URL into a web browser to download a list of all geographic units (in this case Major Land Resource Areas) for the Ecological Site Descriptions catalog.

              
# Copy and paste this URL into a web browser.
# A tab-delimited file will be downloaded.
https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/geo-unit-list.txt
              
            

Ecological classification

An ecological classification is a system of categorizing land areas based on ecological criteria. The ecological site classification system developed by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service is one example. The individual units of an ecological classification are referred to as ecological classes. Like geographic data sets, ecological classifications are typically not referenced in web page URLs or web service calls, since each data catalog is always associated with a single ecological classification.

Enter the following URL into a web browser to download a list of all published ecological classes (in this case ecological sites) for the Ecological Site Descriptions catalog.

              
# Copy and paste this URL into a web browser.
# A tab-delimited file will be downloaded.
https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/class-list.txt
              
            

Geographic unit

A geographic unit is a region, sub-region, or other map unit used to give information in EDIT a geographic reference. Nearly all information contributed by EDIT users is ultimately tied to a single geographic unit. This design enables users to quickly narrow the information potentially relevant to their location(s) of interest. Each geographic unit is member to a broader collection of units known as a geographic data set.

Enter the following URL into a web browser to download a list of all published ecological sites for Major Land Resource Area 128X, Southern Appalachian Ridges and Valleys. The geographic unit is specified in the URL by its symbol, "128X". Additional parameters have been included in the call to restrict the list to only those ecological sites associated with mountain slope and ridge landforms AND slopes between 15 and 30%.

              
# Copy and paste this URL into a web browser.
# A tab-delimited file will be downloaded.
https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/128X/class-list.txt?slope=15:30&landform=mountain slope|ridge
              
            

Ecological class

An ecological class is a conceptual grouping of land areas based on ecological criteria. Ecological classes are typically used to characterize variation in land potential. As a result, they are often defined using climate, soil, topographic, and other ecological properties that are slow to change. Each ecological class is associated with a single ecological classification. For organizational purposes, each ecological class is also related to a single geographic unit, although it is not uncommon in practice for an ecological class to be represented outside of the geographic unit it is assigned to.

Unlike geographic units, individual ecological classes are often impractical to map, due to the relatively fine scale variation they describe. The utility of the two data structures is similar, however. Both enable users to quickly filter and apply information relevant to their ecosystem(s) of interest.

Enter the following URL into a web browser to retrieve data in JSON format for the Thermic Cherty Dolomite Upland Oak-Hickory Forest ecological site of Major Land Resource Area 128X. The ecological class is specified in the URL by its ID, "F128XY001TN".

              
# Copy and paste this URL into a web browser.
# A JSON file will be downloaded.
https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN.json
              
            

Ecological site description

The Ecological Site Descriptions catalog contains information not available for other data catalogs. This information is organized into a document known as an ecological site description (ESD), which consists of nine sections: general information, physiographic features, climatic features, water features, soil features, ecological dynamics, interpretations, supporting information, and reference sheet. Web services are available to retrieve data associated with each section.

Enter the following URL into a web browser to retrieve climatic features data in JSON format for the Thermic Cherty Dolomite Upland Oak-Hickory Forest ecological site of Major Land Resource Area 128X.

              
# Copy and paste this URL into a web browser.
# A JSON file will be downloaded.
https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/climatic-features.json
              
            

State and transition model

A state and transition model (STM) is a conceptual model of ecosystem dynamics typically represented as a box and arrow diagram. STMs can be thought of as a categorical modeling approach, because they depict ecosystem change as a process of transitioning from one distinct ecosystem state to another. State and transition models are typically not referenced in web page URLs or web service calls, since each ecological class is currently associated with a single state and transition model.

Enter the following URL into a web browser to retrieve a JSON file of all ecosystem states described in the state and transition model for ecological site F128XY001TN.

              
# Copy and paste this URL into a web browser.
# A JSON file will be downloaded.
https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/models/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/states.json
              
            

Ecosystem state

An ecosystem state is a fundamental state and transition model component typically represented as a box in the model diagram. It is used to represent one of potentially many expressions of an ecosystem through time. Each ecosystem state may, as a concept, encompass a range of natural variability in ecosystem characteristics.

EDIT supports three distinct state types: land use, ecosystem state, and plant community. The definition of each type is somewhat open to interpretation and may vary among data catalogs. The land use type is commonly used to represent ecosystem phases made possible only through sustained, permanent, and/or overriding human influence or infrastructure. The ecosystem state type is commonly used to represent ecosystem phases possessing highly self-reinforcing features, such that a transition to another state is unlikely in the absence of external forces. The three state types constitute a hierarchy. A single land use can include multiple ecosystem states. A single ecosystem state can include multiple plant communities. The plant community type is sometimes referred to as a community phase in order to highlight abiotic (e.g., soil) variation that may also be central to the state concept.

Enter the following URL into a web browser to retrieve forest overstory composition data for plant community 1.1 of the Thermic Cherty Dolomite Upland Oak-Hickory Forest ecological site. The ecosystem state is specified in the URL by three numbers corresponding to the land use, ecosystem state, and plant community of interest. Here we are requesting the first community of the first state of the first land use. Although land uses have not been described in this particular model, we must provide "1" as a placeholder.

              
# Copy and paste this URL into a web browser.
# A JSON file will be downloaded.
https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/plant-community-tables/esd/128X/F128XY001TN/1/1/1/forest-overstory.json
              
            

Transition

A transition (also known as a "state transition") is a fundamental state and transition model component typically represented in the model diagram as an arrow connecting two boxes. It is used to indicate the potential for an ecosystem to shift from one conceptual state to another. Each transition may be associated with various kinds of information, such as details about the events or practices precipitating the ecosystem change.

EDIT supports four distinct transition types, corresponding to the type of state under consideration: conversion, transition, restoration pathway, and community pathway. Conversions are only used to represent shifts between land uses, transition and restoration pathways are only used to represent shifts between ecosystem states, and community pathways are only used to represent shifts between plant communities. The restoration pathway type typically indicates state transitions that are considered desirable. Some data catalogs or model developers may opt not to utilize restoration pathways.

Enter the following URL into a web browser to download a list of transition narratives for all state and transition models associated with Major Land Resource Area 128X, Southern Appalachian Ridges and Valleys.

              
# Copy and paste this URL into a web browser.
# A tab-delimited file will be downloaded.
https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/039X/model-transition-narratives.txt
              
            

Tutorial 2. Downloading PDFs for a geographic region

Although the EDIT website provides various point-and-click options for downloading information in PDF format, there are situations where downloading individual PDF documents is not efficient. EDIT web services make it easy to retrieve documents for multiple ecological classes or geographic units in a fairly rapid fashion. The following example demonstrates the use of the R programming language to download ecological site descriptions (ESDs) for all ecological sites associated with Major Land Resource Area (MLRA) 118A. The tutorial assumes that readers have a basic familiarity with the R language or are able to implement a similar workflow in their preferred language.

Get the ecological site list

The Class List web service returns a tab-delimited list of ecological sites associated with MLRA 118A. Users can employ this web service, together with the R function read.table, to populate a data frame of ecological sites.

              
# Specify the Major Land Resource Area
mlra <- "128X"

# Build the base web services URL needed to retrieve the ecological site list
list.url <- paste0("https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/", mlra, "/class-list.txt")

# Read the ecological site list into a data table, skipping the the first two lines, which contain metadata
ecoclasses <- read.table(list.url, header=TRUE, sep="\t", skip=2)
              
            

Download PDFs

The next step is to iterate through the data frame created in step one, downloading a description of each ecological site using the Class Description web service and the R function download.file. PDFs will be written to the folder specified by the variable pdf.folder. Note that the download.file parameter mode must be set to "wb" in order to write binary PDF files. Users can expect some PDFs to be several MB in size and download times to be several seconds per document.

              
pdf.folder <- "C:/Temp/ESDs/128X"

# Specify the base URL that will be used to retrieve each document
base.url <- paste0("https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/", mlra)

# Loop through the ecological site list
for (row in 1:nrow(ecoclasses)) {
    # Get the ecological site ID from the second column
    ecoclass.id <- ecoclasses[row, 2]
    
    # Build the path to the ecological site description PDF using the base URL and ecological site ID
    doc.url <- paste0(base.url, "/", ecoclass.id, ".pdf")

    # Build the output file path using the ecological site ID
    doc.path <- paste0(pdf.folder, "/", ecoclass.id, ".pdf")

    # Download the PDF
    download.file(doc.url, doc.path, mode = "wb")
}
              
            

Tutorial 3. Downloading PDFs for point locations

Like Tutorial 2, the following example walks users through the process of downloading ecological site descriptions using the R programming language. The objective here is to download descriptions for a number of distinct geographic locations, rather than for a single geographic region. Such locations could be study sites, monitoring points, or some other area of interest.

The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service's Soil Data Access (SDA) interface provides a suite of web services for accessing published soil survey data. This tutorial leverages SDA web services, in conjuction with EDIT web services, to obtain ecological site information for a small set of example point locations. SDA web services are used to (1) determine the soil survey map units intersecting example locations and (2) obtain the ecological site IDs associated with those map units. EDIT web services are used to download the ecological site description corresponding to each ID. The steps described here can only be performed for the Ecological Site Descriptions catalog, and only where soil survey mapping and ecological site correlation has been completed.

Create a set of coordinates

We begin by creating four example coordinates and adding them to a standard data frame. In most real-world applications, users would not manually code geographic features into their scripts, but rather load them from a comma-delimited file, shapefile, geoJSON file, or similar file type. We employ an inline approach here because it allows users to replicate the tutorial in its entirety. Once populated, the data frame is converted to a SpatialPointsDataFrame object. Then, we export the SpatialPointsDataFrame as a shapefile to demonstrate a more realistic way of importing geographic data into the R environment.

              
# Load required libraries
library(rgdal)
library(sp)
library(rgeos)
library(soilDB)

# Create a set of coordinates to use in the demonstration
id <- c(1,2,3,4)
lon <- c(-106.88166046, -106.73849487, -106.77694702, -106.80681610)
lat <- c(32.58280789, 32.50263916, 32.50003320, 32.66781837)
demo.points <- data.frame(id, lon, lat)

# Create a shapefile of the demonstration points
point.file <- "C:/Temp/demo_points.shp"
demo.sp <- SpatialPointsDataFrame(demo.points[,2:3], demo.points)
writeOGR(demo.sp, dsn=point.file, layer="demo_points", driver="ESRI Shapefile", check_exists=FALSE)
              
            

Query soil survey information

Once our set of example locations has been loaded, it is time to query soil survey information for each point using Soil Data Access. Queries are submitted to SDA using the SDA_query function of the R package soilDB. This function takes a valid T-SQL string as its argument and returns SDA query results as a data frame.

Example point features are extracted from the data set using a standard loop, and separate queries are constructed for each feature. These queries can be described as having two logically distinct parts. First is the subquery q.sub, which is used to identify the soil map unit intersecting our point of interest. The custom SDA function SDA_Get_Mukey_from_intersection_with_WktWgs84 performs the spatial intersection and only accepts spatial data formatted as Well Known Text. Point locations are converted to Well Known Text using the R function writeWKT prior to being inserted into the subquery.

The rest of our SDA query mainly serves to specify what information will be requested for soil map units identified by subquery q.sub. Here we request map unit symbol, name, and all correlated ecoclasses. In addition, we explicitly restrict the query to NRCS Rangeland and NRCS Forestland Sites, which are the only ecoclass types supported by EDIT. Soil data queried for each point location is combined into a single data frame and written to a comma-delimited file for later reference.

              
# Load the point shapefile created in step one
points.sp <- readOGR(point.file)

# Create a data frame to store query results
result.all <- data.frame()

# Loop through the point shapefile and query soil survey data for each point
for (i in 1:nrow(points.sp)) {
    pnt <- points.sp[i,]
    
    # Convert the spatial geometry object to a Well Known Text string
    pnt.wkt <- writeWKT(pnt)
    
    # Query the soil survey map unit intersecting the point location
    q.sub <- paste0("SELECT * FROM SDA_Get_Mukey_from_intersection_with_WktWgs84('", pnt.wkt, "')");
    
    # Query soil survey map unit and ecological class information
    q <- paste0("SELECT muaggatt.musym, muaggatt.muname, coecoclass.ecoclassid 
                 FROM muaggatt
                 INNER JOIN (", q.sub, ") AS s ON muaggatt.mukey = s.mukey 
                 LEFT JOIN component ON muaggatt.mukey = component.mukey
                 LEFT JOIN coecoclass ON component.cokey = coecoclass.cokey 
                 AND coecoclass.ecoclasstypename IN ('NRCS Rangeland Site', 'NRCS Forestland Site') 
                 GROUP BY muaggatt.musym, muaggatt.muname, coecoclass.ecoclassid")
  
    # Get Soil Data Access query results
    result <- SDA_query(q)
    
    # Add the point location ID to the results
    result <- data.frame(pnt$id, result)
    
    # Combine results
    result.all <- rbind(result.all, result)
}

# Save the soil data table for later reference
result.file <- "C:/Temp/point_query.csv"
write.table(result.all, result.file, sep=",", col.names=TRUE, row.names=FALSE)
              
            

View the soil data table

Results of step 2 can be viewed by opening the file point_query.csv. As one would expect, each example location is associated with a single soil survey map unit. Also worth noting is the one to many relationship between map units and ecological sites. It is clear from this table that multiple ecological sites can occur within a single map unit. In addition, there is no guarantee that all of the ecological sites actually present within a map unit have been accurately documented by the soil survey. Field sampling is typically the only reliable way to determine which ecological sites are represented at a geographic location.

              
"pnt.id","musym","muname","ecoclassid"
1,"WH","Wink-Harrisburg association","R042XB011NM"
1,"WH","Wink-Harrisburg association","R042XB012NM"
1,"WH","Wink-Harrisburg association","R042XB015NM"
2,"ST","Stellar association","R042XB012NM"
2,"ST","Stellar association","R042XB014NM"
2,"ST","Stellar association","R042XB018NM"
2,"ST","Stellar association","R042XB023NM"
3,"NU","Nickel-Upton association","R042XB010NM"
3,"NU","Nickel-Upton association","R042XB015NM"
4,"OR","Onite-Pintura complex","R042XB011NM"
4,"OR","Onite-Pintura complex","R042XB012NM"
              
            

Download PDFs

The soil data table created in step 2 contains all of the information needed to download ecological site descriptions for our example locations. To avoid replicating documents, a vector of unique ecological site IDs is first extracted from the soil data table using the R function unique. The resulting vector is then traversed via a standard loop, and a PDF of each ecological site description is downloaded to a local folder using the EDIT Class Description web service and the R function download.file. Note that the download.file parameter mode must be set to "wb" in order to write binary PDF files. Also note that we have added a sections query parameter to the Class Description call, indicating that we wish to include only the general information, physiographic features, climatic features, water features, and soil features sections of the description. Be sure to remove this parameter if you wish to download all sections. Users can expect some PDFs to be several MB in size and download times to be several seconds per document.

              
# Specify the output folder
pdf.folder <- "C:/Temp/ESDs/point_locations"

# Specify the base URL that will be used to retrieve each document
base.url <- "https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd"

# Get a list of unique ecological site IDs
ecoclasses <- unique(result.all$ecoclassid)

# Loop through the ecological site list
for (i in 1:length(ecoclasses)) {
    ecoclass.id <- ecoclasses[i]
    
    # Get the MLRA symbol from the ecological site ID
    if (nchar(ecoclass.id) == 12) {
        mlra <- substr(ecoclass.id, 3, 6)
    }
    else {
        mlra <- substr(ecoclass.id, 2, 5)
    }

    # Build the path to the ecological site description PDF using the base URL, MLRA symbol, and ecological site ID
    doc.url <- paste0(base.url, "/", mlra, "/", ecoclass.id, ".pdf?sections=general-information|physiographic-features|climatic-features|water-features|soil-features")

    # Build the output file path using the ecological site ID
    doc.path <- paste0(pdf.folder, "/", ecoclass.id, ".pdf")

    # Download the PDF
    download.file(doc.url, doc.path, mode = "wb")
}
              
            

Note on ecological site IDs

There is an ongoing effort to replace current eleven-digit ecological site IDs with twelve-digit codes. However, changes may not be immediately reflected in SSURGO data and similar products. Web service calls that utilize a legacy eleven-digit code will return a 302 response containing the correct URL for the ecological site. Most web browsers will automatically redirect to the URL specified in the 302 response. Users can also utilize a web service such as the Class List web service to identify the current ecological site ID associated with a legacy eleven-digit code.

Tutorial 4. Building a simple STM viewer

Some developers may wish to incorporate EDIT content into their own web pages. The following tutorial provides a simple example of how this can be accomplished. Here, we construct a rudimentary web application for viewing state and transition model (STM) diagrams associated with individual ecological sites. The application consists of three main components: (1) a menu for selecting a Major Land Resource Unit (MLRA), (2) a menu for selecting an ecological site, and (3) an iframe for displaying the STM diagram.

If a user selects a new option from the MLRA menu, the ecological site menu will be re-populated with those ecological sites associated with the selected MLRA. If a user selects a new option from the ecological site menu, the STM diagram for that ecological site will be displayed in the iframe.

Create a HTML file

First, we create a HTML document named stm-viewer.html and save it in a convenient directory. Next, the three main components of the application are added to the document. Empty menus are created using the <select> tag, and an iframe is inserted below the menus as a means of displaying STM diagrams. The HTML document contains all of the code a web browser will use to render our web page.

              
<!-- stm-viewer.html -->
  
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <meta charset="utf-8" />
    <title>STM diagram viewer</title>
    </head>
  <body>
    <form style="max-width:400px;">
      <label>Select a Major Land Resource Area</label>
      <br>
      <select id="mlra-menu" style="width:100%;"></select>
      <br>
      <br>
      <label>Select an ecological site</label>
      <br>
      <select id="ecoclass-menu" style="width:100%;"></select>
      <br>
      <br>
    </form>
    <div style="max-width:800px;">
      <iframe id="stm-diagram" src="" style="width:100%; height: 800px;"></iframe>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>
              
            

Create a JavaScript file

A second file named stm-viewer.js is created in the same directory as the HTML document. This file provides a convenient place to organize JavaScript code needed to handle user interactions with our application. A reference to the JavaScript file is added to the HTML document using a <script> tag.

              
<!-- stm-viewer.html -->
...  
  <body>
    <!-- Add the script tag to the bottom of the existing body tag -->
    ...
    <script src="stm-viewer.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  </body>
...
              
            

Fetch menu options

When the web page is loaded into a browser, the MLRA and ecological site menus will both be empty. The Geographic Unit List web service can be leveraged to populate the MLRA menu. But first, we must create a function called fetchMenuItems to query the web service using an XMLHttpRequest object. The function is also designed to query the Class List web service if ecoclass is given as the menuType parameter.

              
// 'stm-viewer.js'

/**
 * This function fetches options for the MLRA or ecological site menu
 */
function fetchMenuItems(menuType, mlra) {
    var request = new XMLHttpRequest();
    var errorMsg = 'Menu items could not be retrieved.';
    var url = '';
    var list = '';
    var menu = '';
    var idProperty = '';
    
    // Set parameters for the specified menu type
    if (menuType == 'mlra') {
        url = 'https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/geo-unit-list.json';
        list = 'geoUnits';
        menu = 'mlra-menu';
        idProperty = 'symbol';
    }
    else if (menuType == 'ecoclass' && mlra) {
        url = 'https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/downloads/esd/' + mlra + '/class-list.json';
        list = 'ecoclasses';
        menu = 'ecoclass-menu';
        idProperty = 'id';
    }

    request.onload = function() {
        var error = false;
        
        if (request.status >= 200 && request.status < 400) {
            // Load the menu items on success
            try {
                // Convert the JSON response to a JavaScript object
                var response = JSON.parse(request.responseText);
                
                if (response.hasOwnProperty(list)) {
                    updateMenu(menu, response[list], idProperty);
                } 
                else {
                    alert(errorMsg);
                }
            }
            catch (e) {
                 alert(errorMsg);
            }
        } 
        else {
             alert(errorMsg);
        }
    };

    request.onerror = function() {
        // Alert the user to a request failure
        alert(errorMsg);
    };

    // Send a request to the geographic unit list or class list web service
    if (list != '') {
        request.open('GET', url, true);    
        request.send();
    }
}
              
            

Populate menus

After data is retrieved from an EDIT web service, the appropriate menu is populated with the result. To do this, we create a second function updateMenu whose parameters include the target menu name (“mlra” or “ecoclass”), the list of new items contained in the web service response, and the name of the object property containing the menu option value. This function loops through the list of new items and adds a corresponding HTML option element to the target menu.

              

// 'stm-viewer.js'

/**
 * This function updates the MLRA or ecological site menu with the specified list
 */
function updateMenu(menu, list, idProperty) {
    var menu = document.getElementById(menu);
    var frag = document.createDocumentFragment();
    var count = list.length;
    var c, label;
    
    // Remove existing options
    menu.innerHTML = '';
    
    // Create an empty option
    var item = document.createElement('option');
    item.appendChild(document.createTextNode('--'));
    frag.appendChild(item);             

    // Create an option for each item in the list
    for (var i = 0; i < count; i++) {
        c = list[i];
        label = c[idProperty] + '-' + c['name'];
        item = document.createElement('option');
        item.value = c[idProperty];
        item.appendChild(document.createTextNode(label));
        frag.appendChild(item);             
    }
    menu.appendChild(frag);
}
              
            

Display the model diagram

A new state and transition diagram can be displayed in our iframe by assigning a new URL to the iframe’s src attribute. We create a third function fetchModelDiagram to query another EDIT web service, the Ecological Dynamics Description web service, whenever a user selects a new option from the ecological site menu. This web service returns data associated with the ecological dynamics section of the specified ecological site description. Included in the data is a list of model diagrams and their associated URLs. The fetchModelDiagram function assigns the first URL in the list to our iframe’s src attribute.

              
// 'stm-viewer.js'

/**
 * This function fetches the model diagram for the specified ecological site and updates the diagram image
*/
function fetchModelDiagram(mlra, ecoclass) {
    var request = new XMLHttpRequest();
    var diagram = document.getElementById('stm-diagram');
    var errorMsg = 'A diagram could not be retrieved.';

    request.onload = function() {
        if (request.status >= 200 && request.status < 400) {
            // Load the STM diagram on success
            try {
                // Convert the JSON response to a JavaScript object
                var response = JSON.parse(request.responseText);
            
                if (response.hasOwnProperty('ecologicalDynamics') && response.ecologicalDynamics.hasOwnProperty('images')) {
                    // Multiple diagram images may exist. We will display the first one only.
                    if (response.ecologicalDynamics.images.length > 0) {
                        var img = response.ecologicalDynamics.images[0];
                        diagram.src = img.path;
                    } 
                    else {
                        diagram.src = '';
                    }
                } 
                else {
                    alert(errorMsg);
                }
            }
            catch (e) {
                 alert(errorMsg);
            }
        } 
        else {
            alert(errorMsg);
        }
    };

    request.onerror = function() {
        // Alert the user to a request failure
        alert(errorMsg);
    };

    // Send a request to the ecological dynamics description web service
    if (mlra && ecoclass) {
        var url = 'https://edit.jornada.nmsu.edu/services/descriptions/esd/' + mlra + '/' + ecoclass + '/ecological-dynamics.json';
        request.open('GET', url, true);
        request.send();
    }
}
              
            

Add event listeners

In previous steps we created the functions needed to make our STM viewer operational. Nothing will happen, however, until we link these functions to the change events of the MLRA and ecological site menus. We do this by calling the addEventListener method of the menu objects. The listener parameter of addEventListener is used to specify that the fetchMenuItems function should be invoked whenever the MLRA menu selection changes. In a second block of code, the listener parameter of addEventListener is used to specify that the fetchModelDiagram function should be invoked whenever the ecological site menu selection changes. Finally, our JavaScript code calls the fetchMenuItems function directly in order to populate the MLRA menu as soon as the page is loaded.

              
// 'stm-viewer.js'

// Populate the ecological class menu when a new MLRA is selected
var mlraMenu = document.getElementById('mlra-menu');

mlraMenu.addEventListener('change', function(){
    // Get the ID of the selected MLRA
    var selection = mlraMenu.options[mlraMenu.selectedIndex].value;
    fetchMenuItems('ecoclass', selection);
});

// Update the model diagram when a new ecological site is selected
var ecoclassMenu = document.getElementById('ecoclass-menu');

ecoclassMenu.addEventListener('change', function(){
    // Get the ID of the selected MLRA
    var mlra = mlraMenu.options[mlraMenu.selectedIndex].value;
    
    // Get the ID of the selected ecological site
    var ecoclass = ecoclassMenu.options[ecoclassMenu.selectedIndex].value;
    fetchModelDiagram(mlra, ecoclass);
});

// Load MLRA menu options when the web page is loaded
fetchMenuItems('mlra', null);
              
            

Test the website

We can test the STM viewer by simply opening stm-viewer.html in a preferred web browser.